https://www.duolingo.com/medievalmaide715

Irish Eclipsis

I'm back yet again to ask about pronunciation. I was looking into Irish pronunciation of eclipsis a while ago and I just want to confirm it here: the way it works is that you pronounce the first consonant and ignore the second. For example: gcallín is pronounced "galleen", not "guh-call-een". Is this right?

8 months ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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An eclipsing bh is a single consonant, e.g. leis an bhfíon.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/medievalmaide715

Thank you for that mia kara.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo
patbo
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Yes, except for "ng" (e.g. "i nGailimh" ), which actually has the "ng" sound /ŋ/.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goldenhawk11
Goldenhawk11
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This is a link another user posted a while back regarding Irish pronunciation, it may be of use to you. As far as I know it's accurate, but if it's not, I would greatly appreciate being told otherwise. http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/donncha/focal/features/irishsp.html

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The word stress section is inaccurate; it is those words that have neither a long vowel nor a diphthong in any other syllable that tend to be stressed on the first syllable. There are a few dozen words that have their second syllables stressed, and in some dialects other words can be stressed on any syllable with a long vowel, e.g. fuinneog could be stressed on the second syllable.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo
patbo
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In the North, the stress on the first syllable is pretty consistent. Most, if not all, exceptions are (originally) compound words where the stress can fall on the first syllable of the second part. Long vowels or diphthongs don't really play a role for stress there.

Of course, the whole page doesn't address dialectal differences other than saying that they exist, and it doesn't even seem to use a single dialect consistently. But stress isn't something to single out there. What it says is correct for at least some dialects.

8 months ago
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