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"Una hamburguesa con queso."

Translation:A burger with cheese.

4 months ago

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/shpanda4354

Does accept "a cheese burger". Good job.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WafelJongen
WafelJongen
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Why not just say "quesoburguesa"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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English allows us to use a noun to describe a noun. Not every language does that. It's not only the words that are different, but often the linguistic structures are as well.

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sr_Hepworth

Great explanation, and it applies to other situations too.

Whenever we would use a noun to describe another noun in English, we need to swap the position of the nouns and include the word "de" in between. For example:

"water bottle" becomes "botella de agua" (which direclty translates to "bottle of water")

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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Also burguesa is a word with a separate meaning in Spanish. It means a female member of the bourgeoisie.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thesummerdancer

OMG- love your cute waffle profile pic! CUTE!! :D

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sofia418854

No

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiZRaMiReZ703704

Isn't "hamburguesa" a HAMburger?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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I'm not 100% sure, but I think it originated from Hamburg, rather than being connected with the specific meat.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AutumnAkin1
AutumnAkin1
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People from Hamburg are called Hamburgers.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flannery65
Flannery65
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I think the problem is that for most of the world the term is "hamburger" not "burger". Obviously it is not made of ham, but rather the idea of a beef pattie seems to be connected with Hamburg. I get that people are now starting to say "I want a burger and fries" but it is still way more commonn to say "a hamburger and chips".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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I suspect which is more common depends on where you are from. Burger is definitely more common than hamburger in the US. The word "chips" means something entirely different to us as well. I believe those are what is called "crisps" in the UK.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betsys2003
betsys2003
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But not in the US, and that's the English dialect that Duo uses. Here, a "burger" is understood to be a hamburger, a beef patty. If you want something different, then you specify (a turkey burger, a chicken burger, a veggie burger, whatever).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arctinus
Arctinus
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It has nothing to do with ham, but with the Hamburg(er) meat/steak the hamburger was originally made of and which originated in Hamburg.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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It can translate either as hamburger or burger.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/hamburguesa

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yomalyn
Yomalyn
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2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karenlawes

Why is it sometimes con queso or de queso?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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We are learning two prepositions in the section as well as food words. One of the prepositions is "con". "Con" is fairly straightforward. It generally translates as "with".

"De", on the other hand, is complicated. It does a lot of things in Spanish. It often translates as "of", but in many cases is translated by a grammatical structure instead of a word. It also has many other translations.

In this section they are teaching us one of the ways in which it translates as a grammatical structure. English allows us to describe describe a noun with a noun in certain cases—cheese sandwich, orange juice, horror movie, etc. In Spanish, you cannot generally do that. Instead they use the structure of "noun of noun"—sándwich de queso, jugo de naranja, película de terror, etc.

So "hamburguesa con queso" is a burger with cheese. It would not be "hamburguesa de queso" because that would be a ground patty of cheese on bread not a ground patty of beef with cheese on bread. It would also not be a queso hamburguesa because you cannot use the noun cheese to describe the noun hamburguesa. Therefore, you need a preposition to connect the two nouns.

*In both English and Spanish, orange (naranja) is only an adjective when referring to color not when referring to fruit.

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AutumnAkin1
AutumnAkin1
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And technically the adjective form of orange is anaranjado, not naranja, so as to not be confused about which one you are seeing.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deb1134
Deb1134
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I have been seeing de color naranja for orange and de color café for brown.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ezhil334747

THANK YOU

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jthetruth99

great explanation, thanks

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glennathy

Hi. So "cheeseburger" is a shortened way of saying "a burger with cheese" in English. Is there a similar condensed way in Spanish, or is "una hamburguesa con queso" the generally used phrase? Thank you :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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No, Una hamburguesa con queso.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sr_Hepworth

No there isn't a shorter way of saying this in Spanish. You have to use the full "hamburguesa con queso"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jayce535632

I think the reason we have a shortened form of this, and they don't is because English speakers (at least in the US) talk about cheeseburgers a lot. In most, if not all Spanish-speaking places, they simply don't have cheeseburgers, so there's no reason to shorten it. Similar to how we don't have a term for the Spanish dish "paella" other than "a Spanish dish of rice, saffron, chicken, seafood, etc., cooked and served in a large shallow pan." We also use it untranslated, but that's because we Americans love other counties' foods.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/max761271

"a cheeseburger" should be accepted

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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It is.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OrlyWolf

Could one say "hamburguesa del queso"?

2 weeks ago