"¡Mi gato tiene nueve vidas!"

Translation:My cat has nine lives!

6 months ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LjBLJ

I am told that in México the phrase is: Gatos tienen siete vidas. I guess life is shorter for cats there?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tkdblake93
tkdblake93
  • 25
  • 20
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 5

Yes, there's a song in Spain by the late singer Antonio Flores called "Siete Vidas": "Que siete vidas tiene un gato; Seis vidas ya he quemado; Y esta ultima la quiero vivir a tu lado, oh, oh." It's a song about strained love. In Brazil cats also have only 7 lives.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 19
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 8

That goes for every Spanish speaking country, so I flagged this sentence as unnatural.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

I got it right. I have two cats. One of them was just diagnosed with feline diabetes and I am giving her insulin twice per day. She almost got ran over and killed once and then I saved her life again when she got a bad infection after she was spayed, so I want my kitty to have nine lives. I love the little sweetie!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

No te preocupes, tu gata de veras tiene nueve vidas. Espero que todo vaya bien con ella.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaroldCraw1

"mi gata tiene nueve vidas" was rejected. With the gender of the cat unspecified, either "gato" or "gata" should be accepted.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmokrator

For the most part, Spanish doesn't attach gender to animals like that. All cats are gatos. The only exception would be a pet you're particularly fond of, and it would be a kind of linguistic anthropomorphism.

Ergo, "El gato es femenino." is an appropriate Spanish sentence (assuming my Google translate for the word "female" is correct).

That said, it would probably be pretty reasonable for DL to accept that.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elvolcanchapin

False. Spanish DOES attach gender to several animals, la gata is a valid translation of 'the cat' (and the name of a soap op), it's just kind of strange to specify in normal speech unless context demands it. If you don't know or don't want to specify the gender, or you just want to refer to a cat/cats generally, you use the masculine form. Thus, el gato can refer to a female cat, but if you want to specify, you say 'la gata'. Just be careful when doing it with 'perro' because perra is as rude as it is in English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 15
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 858

In Spanish "cats have seven lives". En Español "los gatos tienen siete vidas."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenFrommherz

too bad that the German cats only have seven... :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tkdblake93
tkdblake93
  • 25
  • 20
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 5

Same for cats in Hispanophone and Lusophone countries.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelAmos2

Nueve vidas! 9 lives!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mountnman100

Me no gusta gatos.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qiqingliuyu
qiqingliuyu
  • 20
  • 13
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

In China, the cat is considered to own 9 lives. 猫有九条命

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David711176

But gata wasn't an option?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmokrator

We don't get all the same questions from a particular translation. You may have gotten multiple choice, whereas HaroldCraw1 seems to have free-response translated from English to Spanish. I was instructed to translate from Spanish to English. Alternatively, you may have used a word bank, where as HaroldCraw1 chose to type their response instead, which is an option for every word bank question.

4 months ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.