Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Un jugo de naranja, por favor."

Translation:An orange juice, please.

3 months ago

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JayaMyers1

ORANGE JUICE PLEASE

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jon235428
Jon235428
  • 19
  • 11
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2
  • 152

Curiosly, elsewhere in this lesson it asks me to omit the "a" in the english translation, whereas its required here (even though "an orange juice" sounds awkward to my ear as a native speaker)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

Due to Duolingo's focus on vocabulary, awkward sentences are par for the course, and we are forced to provide our own context.

In this case:
Waiter: What would you like to order?
Customer: I would like an orange juice, please.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beckam12

I must agree

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel303668

Orange juice is a non-count noun in English. Never use an/a because they mean ONE!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
  • 25
  • 10
  • 313

Except that this section is on restaurants and the single most common way to order a beverage in a restaurant is like this. "What would you like to drink?"

"An orange juice", "a coke", "an iced tea", etc.

In terms of grammar, you are correct. However, circumstantially as practiced in real life, this is correct.

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12buntu

Where in the mountains, im also from the Appalachian Mountains

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
  • 25
  • 10
  • 313

Asheville. I also lived in Alaska for a while, and I notice that your image is of the northern lights. You?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmandaBeaty75

I wouldn't use it at home, but at a restaurant, I might order "an orange juice," just as someone might order "a coffee." What I would never say is "a milk," but I haven't seen that in the lesson.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Princessa492628

But you can say ''a glass of milk''

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcseain
dcseain
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 4

An orange juice is normal to say and hear in restaurants here in tne DC area, meaning one serving thereof.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
  • 25
  • 10
  • 313

Not just DC. I've waited tables in Arizona, Maine, Alaska, and North Carolina. It's all over the US as far as i can tell. I'm guessing most of the folks saying that you'd never say it this way have never waited tables.

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beckam12

Interesting

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kathy508728

Somehow it doesn't seem right that "coffee, please" was "un café, por favor" but "un jugo de naranja" doesn't translate to "orange juice, please." A little lacking in consistency. Reporting.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdNed2
EdNed2
  • 16
  • 10
  • 10
  • 4
  • 3
  • 100

I was supposed to type what I heard. Well, I heard "Un poodle de naranja, por favor", and it marked me wrong. So, jugo is pronounced 'poodle'?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thejuanald

Well, you misheard it then. Jugo is pronounced 'who go' which I guess you heard as poodle.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdNed2
EdNed2
  • 16
  • 10
  • 10
  • 4
  • 3
  • 100

The sound quality is often not satisfactory. Makes it impossible to determine what was said. Often I listen repeatedly, also in turtle mode, and still can't tell what is said even after I know the answer. :(

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmandaBeaty75

It can also be harder to hear on some devices. I (usually) have no problem on my phone, but I have to connect earphones to my tablet.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick795127

Im hearing it as something like "hoo-goh" or "h-yoo-goh"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdNed2
EdNed2
  • 16
  • 10
  • 10
  • 4
  • 3
  • 100

OK, thanks, must be my ears.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bethany3815

Good

2 months ago

[deactivated user]

    I was corrected to write, "Un jugo de china, por favor," with "de china" underlined (or maybe it was "de chine"). What does that mean? I cannot get a correct translation on the Internet. Thanks.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
    nc.chelle
    • 25
    • 10
    • 313

    In general, the correct answer is "Un jugo de naranja, por favor". However, in the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico they do use china for orange. See definition 3.

    http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/china

    FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EdNed2
    EdNed2
    • 16
    • 10
    • 10
    • 4
    • 3
    • 100

    That's interesting, china for orange. In Dutch the word is sinaasappel, which IIRC is derived from sino-appel or maybe chinese-appel, which means Chinese apple. I guess oranges originally came from China.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/LuciaRinus
    LuciaRinus
    • 25
    • 14
    • 13
    • 2
    • 169

    It is a good link. Thank you nc.chelle.

    1 month ago

    [deactivated user]

      nc.chelle, thanks for trying to help, but this is what definition 3 said (from your link):

      ADJECTIVE 3. (made of china) a. de porcelana I gave my aunt a china teapot.Le regalé una tetera de porcelana a mi tía.*

      But when I went to that same dictionary, and typed in orange, the second definition was, indeed, China, in Puerto Rico:

      http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/orange

      My only problem with Duo is that they teach one word, in a very early lesson, then suddenly tell me I am wrong for using that word. I have no problem with learning that there are many words, but this method is not helping me remember, during the early phases of learning.

      *I just realized that your link took me to the English-Spanish translation, instead of the Spanish-English one. That's why I couldn't find Orange anywhere.

      1 month ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
      nc.chelle
      • 25
      • 10
      • 313

      That's good to know though. I went to look at the link and even if you click on Spanish-English, you get the same URL as for English-Spanish, and it links to that by default. It's good to know the site does that. Now I know that I need to tell folks to click the appropriate tab in some cases.

      1 month ago

      [deactivated user]

        Thanks!

        1 month ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah604426

        When would you use 'un' or 'una' to mean 'one' as in 'one fish' and when would you use 'uno' to mean 'one'?

        1 month ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/dcseain
        dcseain
        • 16
        • 14
        • 13
        • 12
        • 11
        • 11
        • 4

        Uno is one/1. Un is a/an for masculine nouns. Una is a/an for feinine nouns. Unos/unas for plural nouns. Unos also is ones/1s.

        1 month ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Habiba178786

        how to spell naranja ?

        1 month ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/dcseain
        dcseain
        • 16
        • 14
        • 13
        • 12
        • 11
        • 11
        • 4

        Precísamente como la has deletreado: naranja

        1 month ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Tedee15
        Tedee15
        • 13
        • 8
        • 6
        • 4
        • 4

        In Spain it is said: "zumo de naranja" and latin: "jugo de naranja"

        3 weeks ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Aase929393

        Why is a glas of orange juice wrong?

        3 weeks ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
        nc.chelle
        • 25
        • 10
        • 313

        1) You've misspelled glass.

        2) The Spanish word for glass (usually vaso) is not in this sentence.

        3) You've omitted please.

        "A glass of orange juice" = "un vaso de jugo de naranja" or "un vaso de zumo de naranja"

        "An orange juice please" = "un jugo de naranja por favor" or "un zumo de naranja por favor"

        FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

        FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

        3 weeks ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/DarthTATOR1

        Would, "Un jugo de naranja" be a, "A juice of orange" because you can't use a noun as an adjective in spanish?

        2 weeks ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Tedee15
        Tedee15
        • 13
        • 8
        • 6
        • 4
        • 4

        Un jugo de naranja is ---- an orange juice

        2 weeks ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Son454191

        i dont know how to say naranja the right way, someone help me?

        2 weeks ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Tedee15
        Tedee15
        • 13
        • 8
        • 6
        • 4
        • 4

        You wrote it well: naranja ___ juice

        2 weeks ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Tedee15
        Tedee15
        • 13
        • 8
        • 6
        • 4
        • 4

        when you shout ahhh! pronouce the a like that in naranja, naaaraanjaaa

        2 weeks ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/RyanRobins14382

        In english, in almost all cases, the singular, A or An, An will be used before words that start with vowels. A E I O U

        1 week ago