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  5. "Your ticket."

"Your ticket."

Translation:Tu boleto.

May 18, 2018

116 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash710215

What's the difference between Tu and Tú, when are they used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahaf175670

Tu is a short of tuyo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inez331086

Tu means your - whearas tuyo means of yours and tú means you! So: no es tuyo = it isn't yours tú comes = you eat tu boleto = your ticket


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EchoZulu70

I can't even find the dotted 'u' on my keyboard :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hyacinth3704

you can make the u with an acute accent (ú) in windows by holding down your alt key and typing 0250. (there might be an easier way, but that's the way I know!) Or you can use the little special character input integrated in duolingo. If all else fails you can use your windows character map (usually somewhere in the accessories menu). On most smartphones if you press and hold the letter it will give you a little popup menu of accented versions of that letter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Col876438

Use the keyboard setting and add Spanish and it will give you these in predicted vocab


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BiancaLi13

Wtf That is alot of words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NKSmith90

On a cellphone, hold down the 'letter' you need ie u & ú. On a pc I've only ever used the symbol tool.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShannonMcc730536

hold down the letter, options should pop up


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mfmelik

Download the Google keyboard from Playstore. it's perfect. You can find almost all letters and languages :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MortisPro19

It is right below the "10" key.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

On a PC using US International Keyboard (and maybe some others) type ' followed by u and it will come out as ú. The same applies to other vowels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amit.tadavi44

Add spanish in your keyboard from settings


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayoub36

You need to download a Spanish keyboard or go to your keyboard settings and add Spanish language then you will have it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miguel280968

And is it easy to change from one to the other? Like now I'm writing in English and would the Spanish lay out make much difference or hindrance? I know I could try it to find out.... But I feel quite good to write English with that lay out and would not like to make it difficult. I'm fluent only with letters, for numbers, some symbols and punctuation marks I need to look where they are


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angelwitch99

Tú means you while Tu means your.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WendyHowar9

are they pronounced the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flamdring

Where is boleto/boleta from? I've lived in Spain for four years and never ever heard boleto/boleta, only billete or ticket.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CanadaPolyglot

I believe Latin America, but don't count me on that, I'm from Canada.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/totallyDopeHuman

why can ticket be both "boleto" and "boleta"? why and when is the gender change used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katey1801

My guess is that it's cause in this case someone is possessing it? Like if a female owns it, it's boleta, and if a male owns it, boleto. I believe when things are possessive, the o/a reflects the gender of the owner?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadameSensei

Unfortunately, no. Don't fall into the trap of thinking about who owns the object. A pencil is masculine (el lápiz), even if I (una profesora) am holding it. If a bunch of guys own a table, it is still "una mesa," no matter how macho those guys are.

In other words, a noun will not change gender unless the meaning changes, which is what we have here.

The difference here is that "boleto" is a plane ticket, but "boleta" is like a receipt ticket.

This does not happen often. Usually, a noun is a noun is a noun, and cannot change.

Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miguel280968

muchas gracias S Sensei! mucho claro y me pidio mucho porque es como esto.... Yep I had trouble to work this one out. But as you indicate is quite rare and I knew the owner does not change the gender of names so it had to be something else When you say 'plane ticket' Though do you mean all tickets for a comodity (train, shows etc.) ? But restaurant receipts and the likes are boletas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max_____

"Tu tícket", should be accepted. "Boleto" is used in Latinoamérica. In Spain we use: "billete" and "tícket".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJC626

Report it if it marked both billete and ticket as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anderson_Brazil

Su billete works as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SalilJoshi1

When do you use boleto vs. boleta? Also, in what part of the Spanish speaking world is boleto used vs. billete or ticket?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max_____

Hi. I'm Spanish. In Spain we do not use "boleto", which is used mostly in Latin America. In Spain we use "billete" or "tícket".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaHoffm12

Boleto is Male, and boleta is a female counterpart and à representative of the female of the words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FanOfTomCruise

I...wish we can talk in duolingo...its rather boring learning alone....(・ัω・ั)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adora826564

Im a begginer how am i supposed to know this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon817

hover over words underlined but dont tell no one else


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Herk308

"Boleto" and "boleta" are both correct? When would you use one instead of the other?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miguel280968

H 308, you do know or you think it's correct? Because I saw a comment stating each are use in different situation...I realise DL only says "your ticket" so you are right and for DL to be more appropriate they should not put is this way and further more give us the two different situations with explanation.
Just went again down the posts and found it with the explanation that Bolleta is more for receips but Bolleto like a plane, train etc. ticket. As for those who state that in Spain it is Billete and Ticket this add even more confusion!

It would be nice for DL to explain these ambiguities. Then what should they be teaching, Latin americain or Spain Spanish. Pretty hard though because it'd never end with the diversity found in S America.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Circlesho

Su is formal while Tu is informal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsifStalin5

Ticket should also be allowed instead of boleto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inez331086

Why not Tu billete as billete = train / bus ticket in Spain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sohamjadha10

' Tu boleto ' doesn't seem. Right is there any other translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malik540289

Does "dinero" have root from Arabic dinar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Does "dinero" have root from Arabic dinar?

They're both from Latin denarius: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denarius


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelipeAceboES

we use ticket here in Spain all the time, parking for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlck

I have two choices, both of which are correct. You were not specific as to familiar (tu) or formal (su). I have both answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pete908638

It would be nice if you could here it spoken after you type to get a better understanding of the spoken language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingaWitow

I got it right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelMill845631

EVERYONE SAYS TIKET.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon817

why is su boleto wrong ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CanadaPolyglot

can usted also be used here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

can usted also be used here

usted is "you", not "your".

If you're talking to usted and you want to say "your ticket", it would be su boleto.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Addy280304

My Spanish friend told me the right translation for ticket is " un billete". You can check on google translate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexFromBrazil

Friday, 11/20/2020 (Zumbi's day, Zumbi dos Palmares is alive).

Hola, me gustaria saber se es possible calbiar esta frase para "tu ingreso"?

Soy brasileño.

Hey, I'd like to know if it's possible to change this phrase to "tu ingreso"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SenaSTN

What is "Su" ? It also said su boleto as answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What is "Su" ?

It's the possessive for third person (his, her, its, their).

And since the polite Usted (singular) / Ustedes (plural) acts like third person (Usted like ella, Ustedes like ellas), su also means "your" when you're being polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sequoiaa.

what's the difference between boleto and el billete? doesnt billete mean 'ticket' to? why we use boleto instead of billete? still confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The short answer: billete is common in Spain, boleto is common in Latin America.

The Spanish on this course is (I believe) more or less Mexican, so it uses Latin American words by default -- e.g. carro instead of coche and boleto instead of billete and papa instead of patata.

(But it should accept European Spanish words in translation exercises where you type your own responses.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miguel280968

Don't forget boleta here I read it's also a ticket but more in a receipt context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xigil1

What the difference between beautiful and ticket in spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

bonito vs boleto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangakoibito

Usted as far as I can tell isn't used as your only as you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlck

Usted is also correct. It would be used when speaking to someone more formally, as you would to someone who you don't know or someone to show respect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlck

Again, I was wrong. Usted is formal you. Su, or tu is your.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miguel280968

I guess is because they don't want to be formal yet, but if you use usted you should not put an S on the verb...Oh this one is 2 y old, the one above only 8 hours!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moorea18

That is my question exactly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bridget-river

Is sus also your? Is it the formal form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlck

I misspoke, sus is the "more formal-usted" version, but su or sus depends on whether you are talking about one thing or more than one. Plurality fits the object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangakoibito

My textbook says it's a "poss. Adj. His; her; its; form. Your; their; " so yes that's a good as any other way of thinking about it without getting more into the details then my brain can handle


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-AkiaSim-

I used "Tu Billete" and it was correct? Is this another translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chiragkhoiwal4u

I am not able to proceed further


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaraThomps10

Why is it ti instead of tu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraysonBow5

I like to experience with fun to learn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJC626

This is incorrect. Possessive articles do not have the accent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessunicorn2020

Thank you for teaching me Spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzzyB765316

I accidentally said tus instead of tu, isn't that still right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlck

Only if you want to say your tickets. Tus is for plural objects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crikey4

Why isn't it boleta?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hyacinth3704

maybe a regional/dialect difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dirah4

Why do you have this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piperTom

I used "boleta" and was given credit. But, no, I don't know why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caleb700913

what is the difference between "Tú" and "Tu" they literally mean the same thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khawla_oudainia

Donde está corazón

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