"¿Dóndevivetuesposo?"

Translation:Where does your husband live?

8 months ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DYRD6776
DYRD6776
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Hopefully with me.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

Now that's the question!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neizlemigs

Why would a husband live somewhere that would cause other people to ask where he lives? A husband should live with his wife.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aaron527871

A lot of people live apart for work reasons, caregiving, etc

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadySfb

But not always... Mine doesn't...

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harley588854

You have had a sheltered life. Matrimony doesn't equal cohabitation for a whole mess of reasons.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harley588854

Why do you assume a husband is married to a ’wife' maybe the man's spouse is a husband too... Just a thought

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure

Mine is -- 37 years!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexandraanya

Agreed. There is a sentence along the lines of "su esposo..:" and I translate it as "his husband" (or "su esposa" as "her wife") :D

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dokterblom

Yes, but then it would be 'esposo' not 'esposa'

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Summer852149

He lives in my heart <3

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rory36
Rory36
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Si tu esposo no vivir aqui, podemos jode todos los dias.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sassfb
sassfb
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Aprendí una nueva palabra! But I'm thinking it should be "no vive aquí" (third person singular, not the infinitive) but the infinitive "joder" to follow "podemos".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XDeary

Asking the real questions

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ericrdb

Why would we use the formal 'usted' verb tense with the informal 'tu' possessive adj?

Instead, why not: donde vives tu esposo - or - donde vive su esposo?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Handrisuselo
Handrisuselo
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Tu esposo = your husband (the 3rd singular person), so the verb should be "vive".

Tu = your; tú = you.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bri288742

With his Italian girlfriend

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan766816

Could this also be said as "Donde tu esposo vive?". This form is obviously closer how you would say it in English. "Where does your husband live" vs "Where lives your husband")

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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My understanding is that this structure is grammatically acceptable but rarely used. It is most common to immediately follow the question word with the verb.

From an English perspective it may help to remember that the subject is already contained in the Spanish verb conjugation, so what follows can be treated as additional information: "¿Dónde vive tu esposo?" can be read as "Where does he live (your husband)?"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

?contigo, correcto?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tim757384

Shouldn't it be vives due to the fact "tu" is used?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sassfb
sassfb
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No: it's not where do YOU live, it's where does your husband live. So the verb is the third person form, not the second person form. It's the same as if the question were "Where does he live?"

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenThackra

im new

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luckyblaze

another very provocative construction - assumes a husband does not live with his partner: very modern!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StepheKamykowski

Since this is informal why would "Where's your husband live" be acceptable? "Where does[..] " is almost stilted English.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kittyg2016
kittyg2016
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"Where's" is not a contraction of "where does" but of "where is". "Where's your husband live" is not proper English though "where's your husband" would be fine.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TywdG86

Kamikowski is correct. "Where's" is a contraction of more than just "where is"

Where's

[hwairz, wairz]

I. Contraction of "where is": Where's my belt?

II. Contraction of "where has": Where's he been all night?

III. Contraction of "where does": Where's he study law?

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/where-s

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

When people grow up where older people around them are using bad English they tend to fall into thinking the bad English is correct

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harley588854

Informal language use is not 'bad'.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michelle469382

Very true.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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Quite right, Eugene.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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"Where's your husband living" would be valid, unless the Spanish gerund is called for in such a sentence.

4 months ago
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