"Soloquierountomate."

Translation:I only want one tomato.

8 months ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia953658

According to Garner’s Modern American Usage, the best placement of “only” is precisely before the words intended to be limited. DL’s translation is incorrect, unless the intended meaning is something like, “I don’t want world peace, I don’t want presents for my birthday, I only want one tomato.” If, however, the meaning is something like, “I don’t want two or three tomatoes, I want only ONE tomato, then the DL translation as it currently stands is incorrect.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Hi, please use the button to report problems. The course creators don't read every comment to every sentence discussion, but they do get the reports. Thanks also for sharing this info with everyone here - it's very helpful!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Travelanche
Travelanche
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I actually like the comments here. I can't see the reports that people send but the discussion is very helpful. So keep doing it! I will say that when I've wanted to report something, the button options don't address the problem most of the time. So I'm not sure the problems are ever fixed. One time the select an answer options didn't even include the correct one! But reporting that issue wasn't an option.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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Yes, previously, there was an "other" option on the report button, where you could write the exact description of the issue. Unfortunately, this this been removed.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErgemAugusto

Actually the spanish sentence means "I only want a tomato". Not world peace, not presents like you said. If the word used however is sólo or único instead of solo without the accent mark, then the other translation you gave is right.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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This isn't entirely correct. The "solo" in this DL sentence is the adverb "sólo".

Sólo and solamente are adverbs. As such they can modify verbs or adjectives. In the past "sólo" the adverb carried the accent mark to distinguish it from "solo" the adjective, but now the accent mark is only included if possible ambiguity exists.

Solo and único are adjectives. As such they modify nouns. They must match number and gender with the nouns they are modifying, allowing for these variations: Solo; sola; solos; solas; único; única; únicos; únicas. By comparison the adverbs "sólo" and "solamente" are invariant.

In this DL sentence, with the singular masculine noun "tomate" the adjective would be "solo", but the placement before the verb tells us that this is the adverb "sólo" written without the accent.

Solo [adverb] quiero un tomate - I only want one/a tomato.

Technically, with the adverb modifying the verb, a tomato is my only want, not world peace or anything else.

But if we translate "un" as "one" then it would be common to interpret "only" as referring to that number, even though this is more accurately represented by moving the adverb to modify the adjective:

Quiero solo [adverb] un tomate - I want only one tomato.

There's also the interpretation that I want a tomato on its own, with nothing else. For this I guess it would be possible to use the adjective "solo" to modify the noun:

Quiero un tomate solo [adjective] - I want a tomato only.

All that said, the original DL sentence could be interpreted as any of these versions, so when it comes to "only" (and possibly "solo") placement, I think context is more important than technical precision.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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I didn't see any accent mark on solo, but I like the concept

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

See this quote from "http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/modifiers.htm", one of my preferred grammar resources.

"The issue of the proper placement of "only" has long been argued among grammarians. Many careful writers will insist that "only" be placed immediately before the word or phrase it modifies. Thus "I only gave him three dollars" would be rewritten as "I gave him only three dollars."

Some grammarians, however, have argued that such precision is not really necessary, that there is no danger of misreading "I only gave him three dollars" and that "only" can safely and naturally be placed between the subject and the verb.
The argument has been going on for two hundred years."

"Basic Principle: Modifiers are like teenagers: they fall in love with whatever they're next to. Make sure they're next to something they ought to modify!"

Note that this "basic principle" doesn't say whether the modifier goes before or after the word it's modifying.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

I think the problem is DUO using 'one' instead of 'a'. Had it been 'a' it would have slid by without comment. with exactly the 'dont want anything else' everyday meaning.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amir2121
amir2121
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It can also mean:

All I ask for is a tomato (this reminds me of the scene in the dark knight when the joker says I only want a phone call, while stressing a knife against some policmen's throat...)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillTheYaz
BillTheYaz
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There's ALSO the possibility that it translates: "Only I want a tomato" (My wife doesn't, nor does my son)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bovinecow
Bovinecow
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I think there's another way to say this in Spanish. I'm not sure though.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FerEtayoRguez
FerEtayoRguez
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Indeed there is. "Solo yo quiero un tomate".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pets_r_cool

That would be a different sentence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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This example is perfect, because it beautifully illustrates the difference between solo quiero and quiero solo. Solo quiero means "I merely" or "I just" want a tomato. Just gimme a tomato! Whereas quiero solo means "I specifically want" a tomato---as opposed to a potato.

Note that in neither case is exactly one tomato specified. For that, you really should say "I want a single tomato:" Quiero un solo tomate.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

Printed in red I was given "the meaning" of the sentence : "I just fancy one tomato" Luckily though, the translation here looks quite sane. Only that there seems to be this 'only' placed somewhat controversially. " I only pinch ( meaning not crushed) one tomato" OR Did you say "I pinched only one (not 2-3-more) tomato. "
SO I'm only saying , it depends where you have the main stress in the sentence. In this case it should be on the word ONE , not on WANT.
But we can think it again: Since the predicate 'quiero' carries the subject too (Yo quiero) And diminishing 'Solo' is put there first, you may as well diminish it, too , to begin with. So that would turn to be : "Only I want..." ( but not anyone else ). The word order is a bit more complex in English than in Spanish, I guess...

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raul_007
raul_007
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What is wrong with "I want one tomato only".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

It would be understood but sounds very odd, as would 'I want one only tomato'

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

It's not so common, but is OK. Your version is for emphasis. English often moves adverbs to the end, or near the beginning for the purpose of emphasis.

However, 'I want one only tomato' does not work.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elfoxy97
elfoxy97
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"I want one tomato" not accepted?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pets_r_cool

Spoiler alert

Because it leaves out the word ¨solo¨ (only) and changes the sentence´s meaning.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArmorCroc

No. And if you think about it, don't you too find it reasonable not to accept it?

I can give you examples or point toward a missing word, but I'm sure you'll figure it out if you take a second look. :)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hthjV0D2

So would, "Solo quiero uno tomate" be saying the same thing?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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You'd be understood, but it's wrong. Proper Spanish grammar drops the -o in uno before all masculine nouns.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DickW1

I think if they meant one tomato, 'uno' would be used rather than 'un'

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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Dick and Bai, uno drops the o before a noun. [Uno tomate] is not correct; it is "un tomate." So, "un tomate" means both "one tomato" and "a tomato." Una casa = one house, and a house.

5 months ago
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