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"Lo siento, estoy muy ocupada."

Translation:I'm sorry, I'm very busy.

4 months ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MartineTine

Duo should use a woman's voice to utter this sentence!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Denis943183

It was a woman's voice for me, but I'm guessing when you did it it was a man's voice, which would be appropriate for "ocupado" vs "ocupada."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbbieDeng

I said, "I apologize, I'm very busy." What's so wrong about that? I don't understand why it's wrong.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ljlehou

Where can I get information about the different verb forms? I'm never sure when to use soy or estoy, etc.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Denis943183

I always have this page up in another tab: https://studyspanish.com/grammar/lessons/serest1

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul876110

What is the difference between 'Lo' and 'estoy'. Could they be switched here and why not?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DerekThomp8

"Lo" doesn't have to do with the word "I" in English. "Lo siento" is a phrase meaning "I'm sorry", but it is literally translated as "I feel it". "Siento" means "I feel", and "lo" can be put before a verb to describe the verb as happening to "it".

TLDR: It's confusing, but it would be easier to remember "Lo siento" as the phrase "I'm sorry". Estoy, by the way, means "I am".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisWhatever

"Lo siento" is a stock phrase for an apology, so means "I'm sorry". They need to stick together to mean an apoloy. "Estoy" means "I am".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siobhan800773

Can you say yo soy ocupada? What is the difference between estoy and yo soy

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ola826399

Estoy is something you are for the moment, soy is something you are always. Soy un hombre, estoy cansado

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Ocupada" (busy/occupied) is a Spanish past participle being used as a predicate adjective in this sentence. That's why, depending on the sex of the speaker, the gender of the participle changes. In English, subject complements are nouns that define the subject further, or they are adjectives that describe the subject. For example, "I am Linda/Soy Linda" has the subject complement "Linda," and "Estoy ocupada/I am occupied" has the adjective complement "occupied." "Soy" is used because being "Linda" is my identity, and my identity is permanent. "Estoy ocupada" is a progressive activity, and "estoy" is used because, presumably, I will not be busy forever and thus my "busy-ness" is a temporary condition.

In theory, you would say "Soy ocupada" only if you were speaking of something you do that you will never stop. For instance, you might say "Soy preocupada con cambio climático/I'm worried about climate change." The inference would be that you will always worry about the climate. However, I think this is not colloquial Spanish and is something that native Spanish speakers do not do. They take the long view that permanence is very rare. That is why location and time use the Spanish Continuous Tense; even mountains crumble, and time is always passing.

As far as I know, Spanish past participles are used as adjectives, and Spanish present participles (gerunds) are used as noun substitutes, as in "Reading is my favorite hobby." (El leyendo es mi pasatiempo favorito.) In this sentence, the gerund is the subject, and most Spanish subjects require the article, so I'm thinking that perhaps a gerund subject always needs the article as a cue that the first word of the subject is acting as a noun substitute and not acting as a verb. I have not seen Spanish "-ing" (-ando, -endo, -iendo) words used as objects. Instead, English gerunds seem to be more easily and more often translated into Spanish infinitives when the English sentence has a verbal being used as an object (Verbals are defined as English infinitives or English -ing words used as another part of speech). For example, "My favorite hobby is to read." (Mi pasatiempo es leer.)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinPCunn

Just wondering is this a woman talkong in this statement as we are using "ocupada"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaviOnline

Correct! You'll say, "estoy muy ocupado."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob6465

Sounds like "este" instead of "estoy".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott870359

I got the female voice and it was ocupado

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandonWil744600

I got it correctly

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nypuck
nypuck
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The audio was garbled. Impossible to guess when it sounds like ‘él estoy’. How is one to guess DL’s intention?

1 month ago