"Ĉu lia patro surhavas mojosan pantalonon?"

Translation:Is his father wearing cool pants?

May 20, 2018

9 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnalystBiomecha

How is "surhavas" different from "portas"?

June 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Porti is often glossed as "to carry, wear". It's my go-to word for saying that I'm wearing something.

Surhavi means, literally and figuratively, "to have on". PIV defines it as "porti sur si" (to carry/wear on oneself) and lists the following interesting sample sentences.

  • surhavi ĉapelon, veston;
  • la koverto surhavis multajn pôstmarkojn;
  • nia domo surhavas ardezan tegmenton

Translated: - To have on a hat, clothing - The envelope had many stamps on it - Our house has a slate roof on it

June 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian729689

AFAIK, 'surhavi' means 'to put on', and 'porti' means 'wear', in the sense of 'carry around on the body'. (French and English do the same with 'porter'#)

I can therefore use both meanings: "Mi surhavas mian mantelon en la mateno, sed mi portas ĝin dum la tago"

<h1>Spot the bilingual pun!</h1>
November 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Surhavi means "to have something on it". You're thinking of surmeti - to put something on something.

FWIW, I don't think your pun works. Any fluent speaker would understand it to mean "I have my coat on in the morning and I wear it in during the day." If you're trying to suggest that you take it off and carry it over your arm, or something, you have to try harder to convey that meaning.

December 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian729689

So from that, Duo is using the wrong verb?? Even if it isn't, my point still holds. I can put on ( = surhavi) my coat in the morning. I may or may not wear it ( = porti) for the rest of the day. But Esperanto does not distinguish whether I am 'wearing' it or 'carrying it over my arm' ( I can differentiate the two in English, but not in French, Spanish or Esperanto!)

Incidentally, the computer failed to bring up my marker, #, twice, so my bilingual pun failed to make the grade; the pun was that 'Porter' in French is 'to carry' or 'to wear on your body'. In English, 'Porter' is 'a person who carries your bags for you'. On their body...

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

So from that, Duo is using the wrong verb??

I don't think I said that.

I can put on ( = surhavi) my coat in the morning.

What I did say is that "surhavi" does not mean "to put on."

But Esperanto does not distinguish whether I am 'wearing' it or 'carrying it over my arm' ( I can differentiate the two in English, but not in French, Spanish or Esperanto!)

It's not that they don't differentiate. It's that the word means something different in different contexts. I understand the pun you were trying to make. I'm trying to point out that it doesn't work because there's only one context - and so only one meaning.

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnpentyrch

What is the difference between "malvarma" and "mojosa"?

May 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

"Mojosa" is the sort of thing young people do. You'll hear the word a lot, but it's best to avoid it because it means different things to different people. Instead use:

  • bonega (awesome)
  • interesa (interesting)
  • moda (fashionable)
  • ŝika (showing good taste in clothing)
  • agrabla (pleasant)

"Malvarma" is a temperature.

May 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnpentyrch

Dankon

May 20, 2018
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