"tambiéntesientesfeliz."

Translation:You also feel happy.

7 months ago

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MoeSyzlackin

Just for clarification "se siente" is for use of third person? and "te siente" is for use when "you" is being used?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Yes, "se siente" is the third person form and "te sientes"is the form used for "tú" which is the familiar singular form of "you". "Se siente" is used for "él", "ella" and also for "usted" which is the formal singular form of "you" in Spain and the most commonly used form of singular "you" in Latin America. “Se” is also used for the plural forms "ellos", "ellas" and "ustedes"(plural you, formal in Spain), but as RyagonIV below mentions (I was not clear. Thank you RyagonIV!), the plural verb would be “se sienten”. https://www.thoughtco.com/reflexive-pronouns-spanish-3079371

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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To clarify, the reflexive pronoun se is used for all 3rd-person grammar pronouns (él, ella, (ello), usted, ellos, ellas, ustedes). But for the plural forms, the verb would be conjugated as "se sienten".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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Te sienteS.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dylan913868

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul862466

Clap along if you feel like a room without a roof

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aniseed456

Aplaudir a lo largo si te sientes como una habitación sin techo

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarijaKoren

sentirse, llamarse ..... are so called reflexive verbs and always reflexive pronoun is needed (I am not native English speaker). Como te llamas, Como te sientes, Como se siente ella, como se llama usted, El tambien se siente feliz, Me siento feliz

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alan967216

Does "te" here, stand for "yourself" ? If not why is it there? It obviously does not mean tea !

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kas334864
Kas334864
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In English to feel is a transitive verb, so it can have an object: I feel the fabric, I felt a sudden pain. But it can refer to the way one is, physically or emotionally: I feel fine, I feel sick... In these cases in Spanish you must put the object pronoun: me siento, te sientes, nos sentimos... Think of it as a reflexive pronoun.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marccii1

I think the "te" is there as like to specify that the person is feeling somthing emotionally or on the inside as opposed to physically touching something. But I could be totally wrong about that.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Basically, if you feel an adjective (like "tired", "well", "happy", "angry", etc.), you use the pronominal form sentirse.

If you feel a (pro)noun (like "the table", "my cold coming back", or just "it"), you use the direct form sentir, without the reflexive pronoun.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

alan, you are right. The te does mean, yourself. Note that I did not say it translates as yourself. Meaning is one thing and translstion is another. And just as tu means yourself, so does su mean himelf or herself. Though it can also formally mean yourself as well.

That was a good question about Spanish and not about different ways to say stuff in English and deserves a Lingot.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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You started out great “te does mean yourself” (for tú), then for unknown reasons perhaps a typo you switched the ending and “tu” means “your” and “su” means “his” or “her” or “their” or “your” (for usted or ustedes) while “se” means “himself”, “herself”, “themselves”, “yourself” (for usted) or “yourselves” (for ustedes).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aaron527871

Tea = té

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathanshade

DL did not accept "you are also happy". In English, this is very close to "you also feel happy". Does the use here of "te sientes" instead of "estas" emphasize that the happiness is actively being felt?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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If you use sentirse with an emotion, it gives a vibe of "it'll be over soon". Using estar is a bit more substantial. In any case, you should stay with your translation as close as possible to the original sentence.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter802775

I just discovered a little known difference between Spanish speakers and English speakers. English speakers ARE happy, whereas Spanish speakers only FEEL happy. At least that's what duolingo wants to teach us. My translation of "You are also happy." of the above sentence was classified as wrong.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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This is not true. Just as you can both "be" and "feel happy" English, you can also both "estar" and "sentirse feliz" in Spanish. "Estar feliz" tends to be used much more often than the sentirse form, just like their counterparts in English.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Yes, it is simply the wrong translation of this particular sentence.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarleneDre1

I typed "You also ARE FEELING happy". Why wouldn't that be acceptable?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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The English present continuous is not used with "stative" verbs including "to feel" and the other senses. https://www.thoughtco.com/find-the-mistake-present-simple-or-present-continuous-1209896 https://www.thoughtco.com/stative-verb-1692139

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christinef291986

Awkward sentence as translated

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlokken

I wrote. You do also feel happy. And it was not accepted, (somehow I found it more natural to place a "do" there)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Try reporting it as also correct. I think the most common is “You, too, feel happy.”

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/butterscotchmrrw

Would, 'You feel happy too' be acceptable? Or if not, why?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It's a perfect translation.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DesireeBra14

Is 'you feel also happy' not correct English?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raven.long

It is not. "you also feel happy" or "you feel happy also"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgbryant

Why is "tú" needed ?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It is not.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elfoxy97
elfoxy97
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Why is te needed if you have Tú already?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Sentir is a transitive verb and talks about that you're feeling something. If there's no object that you can feel, but instead you feel "somehow", you'll use sentirse.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/makamakazi

It sounds like hes forcing her to be happy. Just like We Happy Few.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria630955
Maria630955
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I'd also like to know the purpose of "te" here. Can you say "Tú también sientes feliz"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marccii1

Maria630955 Saying it this way would not make sense because it's like you are saying you are actually physically touching happy as opposed to emotionally feeling it within yourself, hence why the "te" is added.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carolynn75851

No. That's what I put. Was replaced wth "Tú tambien te sientes feliz."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenni391979

I was wondering the same.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/______Matt______

Yo tambien

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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You could say "Tú también sientes frio." because "cold" is something physical that you feel, but this sentence requires the reflexive version of the verb because "happiness" is something internal that you feel. https://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/sentir

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

No, the same "pattern" (sorry I am not a grammarian) goes for "frío" as it does for "feliz" (see Maria630955 question and response by Marccii1). Feeling physically hot or cold is still felt inside the body just like an emotion, and in Spanish grammar, treated in the same way.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Reread that please. Without the reflexive pronoun, it would not make sense for “feliz” because it is not something physical that you can touch. Please check the link that I have provided. If you go outside, you physically feel that it is cold outside and that does not use the reflexive pronoun. If you suddenly feel a chill out of fear, then that would probably use the reflexive pronoun.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Whether you choose the reflexive form sentirse or the direct form sentir does not hinge on whether it's a feeling "inside" you or "outside". What matters is whether the thing you feel is described with an adjective or a noun. Frío is a difficult example, because it can be either.

  • Me siento cansada, feliz, anojada, amada, fría, etc.
  • Siento hambre. - I feel hunger.
  • Siento temor por los animales. - I feel fear of the animals.
  • ¿Sientes frío? - Do you feel cold? (Frío is a noun here.)
  • Lo puedo sentir. - I can feel it.
  • Sentimos tu presencia. - We feel your presence.
3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“Siento sed”. is “I feel thirsty.” “Siento hambre” is “I feel hungry.

I guess “inside” is not exactly the right word. “Hunger and “thirst” are physical needs which do not use the reflexive version of “sentir.” Emotions usually use the pronominal version “Se sentir”.

“Siento temor” threw me, but you can have a physical reaction with fear.

So I am glad you cleared that up. I can look for the noun or adjective now to decide which to use.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Thanks Ryagon, I have a fuller understanding now.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Aye, thanks for the correction. I rewrote it. I must have been hungry. :)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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or thirsty? We all make a few. Thank you for taking the time to clear that up.

3 months ago
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