"Je laisse ma viande au chien."

Translation:I leave my meat for the dog.

March 24, 2013

57 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/liberalkansan

If "sandwich au chocolat" is chocolate sandwich, why isn't viande au chien not dog meat? Google translate has it as dog meat...

May 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/greenteagirl67

First, thank you for making me laugh. :-) Second, there are several ways you can tell this sentence isn't talking about dog meat.

1) The verb "laisser" is a transitive verb, meaning that it requires an object. In other words, you have to "laisser quelquechose" (leave something), you can't just "laisser" (If you want to talk about physically leaving a place, you have to use a completely different verb). Therefore, when you see the verb "laisser" in a sentence, you should immediately be thinking "what am I leaving?" (in this case, my meat). Frequently, you are not just leaving something, but leaving something TO someone (laisser quelquechose à quelqu'un). So if you're familiar with the way the verb "laisser" is often used, you'll recognize this sentence construction repeated here, even if the sentence is decidedly strange.

2) When talking about different kinds of meat, you use the preposition "de," for example : "viande de cheval" (horse meat). The preposition "au" is reserved for the way you're cooking the meat. "Viande au vin" would be meat cooked in wine. The fact that it is not "de" and that it is not possible to prepare your meat by dog should lead you back to reexamining the structure of the sentence to make it make sense, and hopefully you will see the structure mentioned above.

I hope this helps clear up some of the confusion. :-)

April 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/lilygilder
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Wow, thank you for that detailed answer! It really helped me! :)

June 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mmarkey

I said exactly the same thing (thinking it was a weird sentence) "I leave my dog meat" Duo has had weirder sentences before

July 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunel

If you are Korean then discussing dog meat would actually be perfectly common (downvote train inbound no doubt). I wonder if it can be translated both ways acceptably.

August 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/spenerish
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Nowadays, it's not so common at all. Dog meat used to be common but the negative stigma grew as the country became wealthy. You wont find dog meat in a typical day at the market.

March 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanaux

Today in Montpellier I saw "Notre plat du jour: steak à cheval" (even took a picture). Maybe if it was dog meat it would be "viande à chien" and not "viande au chien"?

August 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Mattk87

"Steak à cheval" is a beef steak with a fried egg on top of it, as though the egg was riding horseback. I guess you'd call it an idiom

January 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanaux

Ha, awesome. Well that's good to know :-)

January 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/1800MAG
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My Latin teacher always says, never use google translate. Lol

December 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/equilibrihome

google translate is not perfect but if you keep a critical mind it is pratical to get an idea, each year google translate and other translation programs improve, maybe your latin teacher is afraid to lost his job

June 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/brg71
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Very awkward sentence in English!

March 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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Seems like a pretty ordinary sentence in English to me. Of course, it would be more common to use the past tense, as in I left my meat for the dog.

But since we haven't reached past tense in our lessons many examples will sound a little unusual not being phrased in the future or the past.

June 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ashkanpower

how can you tell between "au chien" and "aux chiens"?

December 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Dogmy
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I think you can't and if you want to stress the plural, you use e.g. a pronoun or a numeral.... but that is my estimation.

November 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/wraxtl
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'I let the dog have my meat' worked for me.

June 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/MadameP
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Why doesn't "I'm leaving my meat for the dog" work too?

May 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RogerDavis9

In a previous example laisser was used with "pour" not "à", as in "laisse pour toi". Why not "pour le chien", or similarly "à toi"?

July 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/OpeyemiOke
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I wrote 'i am leaving my meat for the dog' it is right, 'am leaving' is the same as 'leave'.

May 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Hasen6
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this sentence is fine but 'i leave my meat to the dog' is wrong and even has a different meaning entirely.

June 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Perseph1955
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I leave my meat to the dog implies a death, a will, and a bequest.

February 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/felicits

I agree; I leave my meat for the dog = I don't want to eat the meat so I leave it for the dog to eat I leave my meat to the dog = I am writing my will and I want the dog to inherit my meat when I die (i.e. nonsense)

August 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SiblingCreature
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You call it nonsense, but I seem to recall hearing of people actually leaving things to their pets. And what better to leave to a dog than a stockpile of meat? ;-)

November 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/niels87

Why isn't there an article in the french sentence before "chien"?

July 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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Au = à le = to (for) the dog.

July 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/magnus_
Plus
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Why isn't it aux chien?

September 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunel

Aux = a les = plural noun BUT chien = singular noun.

September 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/raloza77

Tried "I give my meat to the dog" but not accepted :(

March 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tmaddox00

I think you would need to use "Je donne ma viande au chien" for this. Giving is a little different (more deliberate) than just allowing the dog to have it. ;)

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/rilianxi
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Doesn't it mean giving in this case? "I let you have something" = "i give you something".

May 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AlirezaJav
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Definitely, I should have failed to translate this sentence if it was from English to French. How difficult it is!!! why "au"? why not? :cry:

October 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Au = à + le = to the

Not sure if that answers your question.

March 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Gabypaul

This is not english. It should be "I left my meat for the dog"

December 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Oh but it is English. "What do you do when you realize you are running late and cannot finish your food?" "Well, I leave my meat for the dog." Sounds like English to me.

December 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mayuen

would this be correct, "Je laisse me viande pour le chien."

January 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

No. The word me is used in reflexive verbs to mean doing something to oneself. "Je vais me coucher" = I am going to put/take myself to bed

When you want to say "my" before a feminine word, the word is ma so "my meat" would be ma viande because viande is feminine. For a masculine noun or any noun starting with a vowel, you would use mon for "my".

I leave my milk/water for/to the cat = je laisse mon lait/eau au chat

March 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tmaddox00

I knew duolingo probably wanted "I leave my meat for the dog," but that is a very awkward sentence normally (despite the creative possible use above). So, I tried: "I am letting my dog have my meat." I think that is much more appropriate in English, but it was not accepted.

February 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SallyORour1

I put "I am leaving my meat for the dog," but it was marked wrong and corrected as "I leave my meat for the dog." How are these different?

January 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LoisBlack

Answered this three times using BOTH answers, and three times i was wrong!!!

January 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LoisBlack

THERE IS SOMETHING WRONG WITH THIS QUESTION.... I'VE TRIED BOTH ANSWERS AT LEAST 10 TIMES....AND BOTH ANSWERS ARE WRONG, I'VE HAD TO ABANDON THIS LESSON AS I CAN'T MOVE ON!

January 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Roody-Roo

That's weird as it seems to be working fine for other people. Did you use all caps in your answer?

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

What do you mean you tried using both answers? If it's the exercise asking you to select all the correct answers and you are choosing only one of the correct answers, you will be marked wrong. Usually that exercise does not repeat the exact same options so you cannot assume whatever was correct previously is what's correct now. It could be that they changed one of the answers so now all 3 or a different 2 are the correct ones.

BTW, typing in ALL CAPS is considered rude in Netiquette rules.

February 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/marie00r
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very indistinct audio on this item

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/solaodut

Why is "I leave my meat to the dog" marked wrong? Will appreciate explanation. Thanks

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/WeaverStacey

My translation of "I am leaving my meat for the dog" is better English but was marked incorrect.

September 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I just noticed that so many people have been penalized for that. Makes no sense to me, since your sentence is grammatically correct and IMO a correct translation of the given sentence.

September 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Oz-Kerryn

Isn't 'au' translated as 'to the'? I wrote 'I leave my meat TO the dog' and was marked wrong.

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Context matters. Au can mean "to the" as in je suis allée au marché (I went to the market); it can mean "on the" as in "il était au bord du lit" (he was on the edge of the bed); it can mean "about the" as in je pense au chat (I am thinking about the cat)...and so on.

So you need to translate the given sentence to the grammatical construction in the target language that conveys the message of the original sentence. Hence "to leave X for the Y" is the way you would translate laisser X au Y.

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SiblingCreature
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Do you have a reference for "to the dog" not being grammatically correct in this context? It's certainly a construction I've heard many times before and it sounds just fine to my ear without any change to the meaning.

February 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

To leave something to someone is to bequeath it (like property in a will). Otherwise you leave something to someone when you are putting them in charge of it. So it'd be a stretch to imply this sentence means "I am putting the dog in charge of my meat" or "I am bequeathing my meat to the dog". It is more likely the meat is being left for the dog to eat. To leave something has the meaning of to not eat it, per [Macmillan],(https://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/dictionary/american/leave_1) which is along the lines of what I have just said--not eating the meat so that the dog can. IOW, no need to complicate matters when there is a more probable translation.

Oh references:

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/leave-sth-for-to-sb

https://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/dictionary/american/leave_1

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/definition/english/leave_1

February 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SiblingCreature
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nods I didn't think of that, but now that you say it, it seems to be a somewhat less subtle distinction than I had initially thought. :-)

February 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamR295805

Surely I am leaving my meat for the dog is equally acceptable?

March 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I concur.

March 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/prky
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What is the difference between let and leave? I agree this is an awkward sentence in English. According to the verbs I learned in this lesson, I think my translation should be correct.

April 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Let = allow; leave = depart from/not take

October 15, 2014
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