"Mijefetrabajapocolosjueves."

Translation:My boss works little on Thursdays.

8 months ago

103 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KimACRowden
KimACRowdenPlus
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Having read through the entire list of posts it's amazing how many people claim 'little' by itself is wrong - most often because they have never heard it used that way. Sad - the world would be a terrible and inconceivable place if a thing were ruled out simply because a person had never heard of it before. If this Spanish Duolingo class teaches you something about English - then embrace it!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee-A-Go
Dee-A-Go
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Have my lingot, Sir.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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That’s nothing you should hear them talk about the word “much” by itself.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jwil426
jwil426
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I feel it has more to do with pragmatics than you're considering. Frankly, using "little" on its own is vague and leaves the text up to interpretation. That's simply bad form for a modern language, and so language evolves.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redsassafras

The translation "she works little" is valid English and doesn't quite mean the same as "she works a little." The first is more along the lines of "she doesn't do much" while the latter implies "she does some." My question, then, is which is closer to what is implied by the Spanish?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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The first and someone above posted 1 month ago that “...doesn’t work much...” is now also accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Allintolearning3, I get that "works little" is a bit negative & "works a little" would be somewhat positive, AND that we are learning different ways to say things, but it seems that if I wanted to say someone "doesn't work much," it might be better to choose the negative & remove all doubt, saying, "Mi jefe no trabaja mucho los jueves," (because "doesn't work much" should equate to "works little"), agreed? Did I say that different way correctly?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John620841

I think the problem here is that a Spanish translation of an English phrase or sentence may not always easily translate into a form that an English speaker would commonly use.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hippoposthumous

The grammar is actually perfectly fine, although it is a dated construction. It should probably not be the default answer, but it is the most direct translation which is gramatical.

If you run a Google book search you'll see constructions like "he works little, but accomplishes much" in Dickens, Joyce, and others.

It's a bit literary, but I'm surprised how many people are completely unaware of the construction, or think that "works a little" is synonymous.

It's a perfectly valid translation, and perfectly conveys the meaning of the sentance. You'd gave go with the far less direct "doesn't work much" (which would be rendered differently in Spanish) or works "a little" which has a subtly different meaning altogether.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

"My boss does little work on Thursday's."
Sounds better and Duo accepts it.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“My boss does little work on Thursdays” is correct, Duo may ignore the apostrophe or perhaps that was a typo, but it is not correct.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SPanya4
SPanya4
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'a lot' is perfectly acceptable and commonly used grammar in English for this translation.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John620841

I can still hear my middle school English teacher say: "A lot is a place where you park your car!". In other words, we were taught back then not to use "a lot" to describe a certain amount or value.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregNixon2

Well, yes, "a lot" is commonly used – among the common people. A more formal or polite way of speaking is to say "much", "many", or "a great deal".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Platospicantes

Using much instead of a lot isn't more polite. That implies using "a lot" is somehow rude. It is definitely more formal, but there's no reason to think this sentence needs to be formal. Formal and informal language have their places.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregNixon2

Sorry, as a professor, editor, and widely published author in English, I can assure that "a lot" is colloquial, juvenile, or street English. It's not "rude", it's just undeveloped, almost slang.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Where are you from? It was considered slang a long time ago. In the US, it is not considered slang. “The common people” sounds a bit rude. Come now, are you British? https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lot

I do like to use “a great deal”, but “a lot” is not necessarily “juvenile.”

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Just one problem, this particular sentence is saying “My boss works little on Thursdays.” which is a negative view as in “not much”. In fact, “My boss does not work much on Thursdays.” is also accepted as correct. You two seem to be talking about a different sentence in which “mucho” would be used instead of “poco” which is used in this sentence.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonyhay

Duolingo will still not accept A little I have also reported it

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“A little” is the positive viewpoint, but “little” is the negative viewpoint.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenSho20

The literal translation is the one they gave. What you would likely say is "my boss doesn't work very much on Thursdays".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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You could try reporting it as also correct. I don’t know if they will accept it or not. We do tend to add “very” when complaining. “very little” or “not very much” will often be heard. Someone above said that “...doesn’t work much” is now also accepted as correct which I feel is a correct translation.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learner340981

In English (and I'm a native American) "My boss wirks very little Thursdays" can have two connotations. Meaning a few Saturdays or very little "on" Thursdays depending on the context of the coonversation. The 1st translation shoild be correct as well in my opinion. Kr we have to consider the age old saying "you can't translate everything directly" some things you just have to learn, know, and accept.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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The expression “Little Thursdays” for “Saturdays” is not used everywhere, but I would capitalize “Little” for that. It seems odd to me, because I know someone who works every Saturday and it is not a shorter day.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shannon844961

Why is "los jueves" translated to "on Thursdays"? I'm missing why "los" would translate to "on" instead of "the".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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The use of prepositions is different from one language to another, some places you will find a different preposition used and some places you will find no preposition used. The English expression “on Thursdays” is specific to English and in Spanish they use “los jueves”, so we just have to translate one expression for another.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EraldoCarv
EraldoCarv
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In Brazil, "boss" is someone who is your employer, who pays you , while "Chief" is someone who is the manager or ruler of a sector of work. The chief is also an employee.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Which words do you use for each in Portuguese? In English, my boss can have a boss he reports to. A fire station has a chief.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee-A-Go
Dee-A-Go
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For those of you who find the english sentence odd. I understand that "my boss works very little on Thursdays" should be the best translation. But "my boss works a little on Thursdays" (as someone suggested) doesn't fit well as the correct translation is literally "mi jefe trabaja un poco el jueves", which may carry a different meaning depending on the context. Im not a native english speaker but I hope I made it clear for y'all :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VixenMoon

I typed the exact thing without capitals and it said wrong. It never did that before.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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It can happen since days of the week and months are always capitalized in English. So, to be clear, you had typed “My boss works little on thursdays.” ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jnieves95

My translation matches perfectly and it still says it's wrong

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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What exactly did you put? A lot of people put “a little” which is wrong when it must be “little” or “not much”

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkL.Patt

My boss works some on Thursday. Was incorrect??

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Again that is the positive viewpoint “a little” or “some” is the “glass half full” type of expression, but this is “little” or “not much” which is the negative viewpoint or “the glass half empty” type of expression.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amber28S

I wrote "a little" and got it wrong.. But as an Australian the sentce with just "little" without an "a" in front of it just sounds wrong to me and I don't see how either way would be positive or negative connotations to the sentence, because in English if someone wasn't happy with someones work ethic they would be more likely to say he doesn't do enough work on Thursdays. But that's just what I'm used to I guess.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“Not much” is also accepted as correct for “little”.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NyashaMare

Why not use menos for less, as in "works less on Thursdays" that might make for a better translation into English. "Works little" is just ridiculous

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RileyMummert

I agree

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cwmgelli

This situation is not helping me to understand the idiomatic use of poco. I agree that it makes little (pardon the choice of word) sense in English to translate these sentences without saying ´a little´ or ´not much´.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Solomko.net
Solomko.net
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Why "My boss works a little on Thursdays" does not work?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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un poco = a little

Poco = little = not much

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supermollusc
supermollusc
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"My boss works little on Thursdays" Not English. "My boss doesn't do much work on Thursdays" is correct

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenMammel

I do not think I should have got this wrong. This is what I wrote calling: My boss works a little on Thursdays.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Please read comments next time as this has been discussed.

“poco” = “little” or “not much”

“un poco” = a little”

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel558018

My boss Works "a" little on Thursdays would be a more accurate translation

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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No that is less accurate.

Un poco = a little

Poco = little = not much

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Panamapal

Again, terrible sentence! My boss works very little, my boss works less, or my boss works a little would be correct.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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There is nothing wrong with this sentence, even though it is less used, When used as an adverb, “little” means “slightly”.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joanne641044

I wrote, ..... a little on.... which I think make more sense in English than little alone.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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It would be more positive: “a little” focuses on what he got done, while “little” complains that he didn’t do much.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lawerence0

My boss works a little bit on Thursday makes more sense that my boss works little on Thursdays.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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It is a different view point “a little bit” is a positive way of looking at it, but this is the negative view point “little” or “not much”.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OscarPosas1

i put "My boss works a little on thursdays" and got it incorrect please fix this!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“A little” is “un poco” and focuses on the positive aspect that he did work a little, but this sentence is “little” as in “not much”, a negative view of it. So it is the glass half empty, as opposed to the glass half full. There is nothing to fix.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Margaret532718

I answered a little and got it wrong too

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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That would have been “un poco”

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scotsloon1

The english is incorrect!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Wrong, it is correct.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dejikay04

"My boss works a little on thursdays" was marked wrong

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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That would have been “un poco” for “a little” and is the positive version, while “poco” means “little” or “not much”.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RileyMummert

For some reason it wouldn't let me add "a" and "bit" around little. In English, it still means the same thing.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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No, it is not the same.

“Un poco” = a little or a little bit (positive view)

“Poco” = little or not much (negative view)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonaldvanR1

True, the English translations sometimes don't make (VERY ;-) ) sense...

1 month ago
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