"Señor,¿escribeustedunlibro?"

Translation:Sir, are you writing a book?

6 months ago

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/musicloverm

The translation uses the wrong verb tense. The translation makes little sense to me, if it was "are you writing a book" then I believe the Spanish sentence should be along the lines of "está escribiendo un libro"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmineHadji1
AmineHadji1
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Verb tenses cannot be translated 1:1. I agree that Sir, do you write a book? would be better to learn, but you have to understand that sometimes Presente de Indicativo = Present continuous. In this example, the man started writing a book and haven't finished it, so in English we would say are you writing a book. However, as he is not currently writing this book while we speak, in Spanish we say escribe usted un libro.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

OK, but there is this connotation: Boss is trying to write a letter- it takes too long, so secretary says: " Sir, are you writing a BOOK !"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria415107

Oh. "Are you writing a book?" seems liks he is currently writing this book soo howeverr ?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Watherine87

He is writing a book in general but that's not what he is doing this very second. You only use the present progressive form (está escribiendo) if the subject is actively doing the action. :)

It's explained a little more on the bottom of this page: https://studyspanish.com/grammar/lessons/presprog

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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"I've been busy." "With what?" "I'm writing a book." - context matters. Here it is perfectly acceptable and not something happening at the moment of speech.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4
MattPotter4
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Yes, for English it is but in Spanish it would not be continuous tense. So this English continuous tense needs to be translated directly from Spanish present tense, which seems to be what some are getting hooked up on.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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Correct

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/December_Girl

The he/she/you (formal) form of a verb (escribe) in Spanish can be translated as the present form (you write or you do write) OR it can be translated as the present progressive form (you are writing). In this case, the latter (you are writing) makes more sense in the context of the sentence so it should be used. But I do think the literal translation should be accepted as a possible answer. *This is how my Spanish teachers have taught it. I'm proficient in Spanish, but not fluent.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolisjlf
jolisjlf
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I think this is one of those situations when it is difficult to keep tenses the same whilst trying to convey the same message. "Sir, do you write a book?" is not something that is commonly said in English with "Sir, are you writing a book?" being the preferred way. But, we are here to learn about Spanish.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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It definitely is not the wrong tense.

In English we are very used to compound tenses and even though many other languages support them, they are not used in the same way as English.

Another language altogether would say this as:

Ĉu vi skribas un libron?

Using the present tense. It also happens to support:

Ĉu vi estas skribanta un libron?

However it's definitely not required and is out of the norm enough to at least sound wierd to those who hear it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shashank756243

Yeah

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krejd
krejd
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Definitely wrong tense. And if it's not possible to translate it correctly because it would sound akward, just remove the whole sentence from the app. What's the problem?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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Never learning things that "sound awkward" or don´t translate well literally would leave us unequipped to deal with Spanish as it is actually spoken and written.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4
MattPotter4
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¨Sir what do you do every day now that you are retired? Do you write a book?¨ ¨Yes, I write a book during the week and write songs on the weekend¨

OR

¨Yes. I am writing a book during the week (but NOT here at the bus stop while talking to you) and I am writing songs on the weekend.¨

Both are correct English tense translations from Spanish present tense. Why? Because the English continuous tense used here (in the process but not actually happening at time of declaration) is NOT correct for the Spanish continuous tense and instead is covered by Spanish present tense.

I the same way that ¨I run to your house tomorrow¨is not correct in English but is a perfectly acceptable way to indicate future action in Spanish. ´Corro a tu casa mañana.´

Remember that Spanish is NOT English with different words.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Przemko0

We need to remember that we are learning Spanish here, not English. In many languages the constrution of sentense does not directly indicate if the speaker has finished or is in the process of doing something. Just remember that in many languages present simple is equal to present progressive.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Giacomo328413

Why must it be "Sir" instead of "Mister"? How would you say "Mister"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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"Señor" also means "Mister." That said, using "Mister" without a last name is very informal in English, to the point where it strikes me as slightly rude.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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For me, "mister" is what I'd call "low English". Not incorrect, but used infrequently. In old movies, you see children addressing strangers that way, asking questions. Also waitresses in diners and bartenders in working-class restaurants and bars. It's not rude in those settings, and "sir" would be regarded as stuffy, toffish, too refined, and out of place.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan766816

Why wouldn't this be "Usted escribe un libro?" ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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You can add the subject if you want to emphasize “you”, but you cannot omit translating “Señor” to “Sir” as we are addressing this question to this person politely. However, Spanish usually omits the subject. This might come off as “Sir, you are writing a book? Doesn’t it sound a bit offensive.? As if we didn’t think that you of all people would do such a thing.

I know that in Portuguese that sentence form with a question mark at the end is the standard, but in Spanish verb inversion is quite common. I would omit the subject for a question in sentence form in Spanish, but I don’t think that you have to omit it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan766816

I was more referring to the fact that the "Usted" is placed after the verb rather than before.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Yes, that is called verb inversion when the subject appears after the verb and it is commonly used for questions in Spanish and in English as well, you will see the conjugated part of the verb before the subject.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dynamo2535

what would be the translation for "sir, did you write a book" then?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolisjlf
jolisjlf
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Señor, ¿escribió usted un libro?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/komokino
komokino
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it didn't accept "sir do you write a book"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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Present tense in Spanish can be either present or present progressive in English. (And also some other tenses, but let´s keep this simple.)

In English, we would be very unlikely to say "do you write a book?" We might say "Do you write books?," but would not phrase the question that way when asking about one book. We would be likely to use the present progressive and say "Are you writing a book?," however.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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The grammar for using the auxiliary verb "to do" in English, and the choice between present simple and present continuous in English, is quite difficult. As a general guideline (not a rule), present continuous is used for current activities, while simple present is used for habitual activities: "He is writing a book now" "He writes books to earn money." You don't use "to do" when asking questions using continuous present: "Is he writing a book?" but you use "to do" when asking questions using simple present: "Does he write books?" There are many exceptions to the way these verb-forms are used.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobbybluehorse

The translation into English is not proper. "You write a book?" is not good English except as a declarative statement.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“Sir, do you write a book?” and “Sir, are you writing a book?” are better questions which are both accepted for this translation.

“You write a book?” is a repetition of what someone just said that is asked in a tone of disbelief. It is less used and it is not a general question. A person could respond with “No, I was just kidding.” or “Yes, I do.” or if asked as “You are writing a book?” -“Yes, I am writing a book.” stressing the “am” or even stopping after the “am”. The question is not “Do you write a book?” but rather “I don’t believe you, is it true?” It would seem a bit strange to be polite by using “sir” and then question the person’s honesty. The stress can be on the word “book” or it can be on the word “you” or really on whatever part you don’t believe. I wonder if this would be worded in subjunctive in Spanish since it implies that you don’t believe the person?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasMacke5

yeah i agree with bobbybluehorse

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/llibllens

Entonces, ?por qué tan entrometido?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasMacke5

how could sir, you wrote a book wrong?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“Escribe” is present tense, but “wrote” is past tense. So it is “Sir, are you writing a book?”, because we use the English continuous form for ongoing activities. He is not doing it at the moment, so we use “escribe” as the Spanish progressive is only for action that is happening at this moment.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/p5NVd1Ju

Is it me or is something wrong here? "Type what you hear" so I wrote Senor,¿escribes usted un libro?. It was marked incorrect, the reason being that I typed in English, not Spanish. ????. Ok I put escribes cos that's how it sounded and it should have been escribe (my mistake for not concentrating!) but I'm pretty sure what I typed wasn't English!!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Did you put the accent on Señor? You could take a screenshot and send it in your report.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/p5NVd1Ju

No but I usually miss out the accents! I get the usual 'pay attention to the accents' message but it's never marked as incorrect. I have reported it. When I re-typed it at the end of the lesson I put 'escribe' (no accent on the n in Senor) and it marked it as correct!!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yeslowlow

I am just starting and based on what has been taught since the beginning (not the advanced stuff you guys talk about) What about: Senor, eres escribe un libro

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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If you are just starting, it would be wise to read the other comments and then you would already have known that was wrong. You are writing,”Sir, you is writes a book.”. However, being a beginner you might not have also realized that there are two verbs in Spanish for “to be” which have specific uses and are not interchangeable. Just your luck, the Spanish progressive requires a conjugation from “estar” and not “ser” and the present participle of “escribir”. Also, the minute you use “Señor”, you will need the conjugation for the formal singular form of you,“usted” and not the conjugation for the familiar singular form of you, “tú”. Then, only if the gentleman is currently in the process of writing at this moment would you use “Señor, ¿está escribiendo un libro? Otherwise, ongoing but not currently happening activities in English do use the present continuous, but then Spanish would use its simple present tense. https://www.thoughtco.com/ways-spanish-english-verb-tenses-differ-3079929

https://www.thoughtco.com/verbs-meaning-to-be-ser-estar-3078314

https://www.thoughtco.com/using-estar-properly-3079738

https://www.thoughtco.com/formal-and-informal-you-spanish-3079379

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yeslowlow

Wow! Thank you. I need a separate course on tenses and rules! I'll keep trudging along and hopefully it will become more clear.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IreneWilli2

por que no decir..Senor. escribiendo usted un libro

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gorg346283

I changed the order to "Are you writing a book Sir?" and it called it wrong but it sounds better that way in English.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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It is fine either way in English, don't forget to pause at the comma, but Duolingo doesn't necessarily know this. You could try reporting it, but if it is not wrong in English in the order that they used then they prefer you to keep the same order when you can.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shiela401185

Sir, to write you a book? is what I see. Could someone please explain this one?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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I'm not sure where you're getting "to" from. I don't see anything that would usually be translated as "to" anywhere in the sentence.

Spanish often marks questions by placing the subject after the verb.

"Escribe" is the corrrect conjucation of "escribir" to use with "usted."

Thus, a literal, but grammatically correct translation would be "Sir, do you write a book?" We would normally phrase this type of question in the present progressive in English, however, so a better translation would be "Sir, are you writing a book?" (Spanish often uses the present where English would use present progressive.)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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To add to b05aplmun.ca, "to write" would be "escribir"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jorgehinojosajr

stupid

2 months ago
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