"Yo tengo muchas amigas en esta clase."

Translation:I have a lot of friends in this class.

4 months ago

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EvaShukevi
EvaShukevi
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Said no one

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Machete69149

Girlfriend (novia) is not the same as female friend (amiga) people

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AkeS11

amigas means girl friends, not just friends.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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Well, it carries the information, but translating doesn't need to.

In English, "friends" is used for any and all genders. Doesn't matter if it is a girl, boy, intersex or anything it is just translated as "friend" unless there is an actual reason to specify the gender the we don't do it.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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"Amigas" just means "friends", however in Spanish it carries information about gender. Do you also translate "jefa" as "lady-boss" or "la estudiante" as "the female student"? Do you translate ellas as "she-theys"?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

¬°Exactamente!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndySalgad2

Novia is girlfriend.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelle596621

I wrote " I have a lot of girlfriends in this class" and I was marked wrong. Por que?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pastorsteve99

I wrote 'female friends' to try to maintain accuracy, and it was considered wrong. fyi.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.M.H.
J.C.M.H.
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Because that would be in Spanish Tengo muchas novias en esta clase.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chupacabrando

Not necessarily, if girlfriend doesn't mean romantically involved. Sometimes women call their female friends "girlfriends."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikiResu

Yes, I've heard some use that too, especially with the very acquainted friends. But it seems to have too much of a slang touch to it. On an everyday-use level, not on a formal level.

Should we change the general rules of grammar because of some cases where women call their female friends "girlfriends?"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pakislav
Pakislav
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First of all it's not a rule of grammar, it's vocabulary.

Secondly prescriptive approach to language is stupid. Language is what people using it make it.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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That is a colloquialism in some English speaking areas, but the proper translation of "amigas" is "friends".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

They also call each other bitches at times too and a whole lot of other uglier names. That is, the modern young ones do.

You can't go by what some people do.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aculady
aculady
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I wrote "I have a lot of girlfriends in this class". It was marked wrong. Would it have been marked correct if I had said "I have a lot of female friends in this class"? I am a female. If I have female friends I would call them "girlfriends" in English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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I am an English speaking female who would never call a friend "girlfriend".

It's not necessarily incorrect as some communities do use it but it is always correct to call them "friends" while only sometimes correct to call them "girlfriends". For the majority of English speakers, "girlfriend" means a female romantic and sexual partner which is "rovia" in Spanish.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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Novia**

Not "rovia", sorry for any confusion there

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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In English, girlfriend has two meanings, a romantic and a non-romantic meaning. In Spanish, novia only has a romantic meaning.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikiResu

I think calling your female friends as "girlfriends" has too much of a slang touch to it. Everyday-use level, not on a formal level.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cyberhick
Cyberhick
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What would you call them, friends that are girls or simply just friends? In english, friend has no gender distinction, but yes 'girlfriend' is a little bit slang. The latin languages, on the other hand, do have a gender specific designation for female friend and this is formal to that language.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

aculady, your problem is that you are focused on English instead of Spanish. English does not denote the sexuality of a friend as the Spanish language does. So the information about the gender of the friend gets left out in the transkation. It cannot be translated as there is no English equivalent to what all AMIGAS mean. Trying to include the idea that the friend is female is not good translation. It is an error to even try it. AMIGAS means FRIENDS in English and that is all. Nothing more.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AkeS11

Why not?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/minkra2
minkra2
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"I put i have a lot of girlfriends.." also (i wish right? XD) but its true its incorrect. We wouldnt say for "hola mi amigo" - hello my boyfriend or male friend.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JulianBixler
JulianBixler
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so many friends, believe me.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/highontravel

It should be "muchos amigos", because in Spanish if there are a group of people of mixed gender than you are supposed to default to the masculine form. By this question using "amigas" it is implying a class full of girls, or that the person has many female friends in their class.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Sure but there was nobody but girls. It was an all girls school.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArpsTnd

So me, I have more girl friends than boy friends in my class (section) although I am a boy. (sometimes, dl knows the story of my life)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guojian53

When the reader says the sentence, she sounds like gobbledygook.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimHernand3

I t used the feminine form of friends. My translation os correct

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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So 'many' is accepted and girlfriends not. I used both. Hard to tell which hasn't been accepted!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArpsTnd

girlfriend = novia, girl friend = amiga (see the space called "friendzone")

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pakislav
Pakislav
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Girl friend/friend = amiga.

Girlfriend = novia/amiga.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusk779496

Sometimes yes, depends on the situation. If you want to convey to the person who you are translating for that the word "girlfriend" in that instance of the English sentence is just a casual friend that is a girl then I think it's alright to tell that person that it is "amiga" but not the way around, I feel.

When you say novia is HAS to be girlfriend. It cannot be a friend that is a girl.

When you say amiga it HAS to be friend.

But you don't really say "female friend" when you talk to people normally I think. That sounds awkward. But I'm confused; if the English equivalent has a specification that the friend is female, Like "My friend that is female." When you translate, do you write just "amiga" or do you write "amiga femenina"? The latter sounds more of a direct translation doesn't it, but it sounds really redundant?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusk779496

However, translating for a person and directly translating are two different things though. It probably is very ambiguous if you say "girlfriend" to a Spanish person that doesn't understand the slang.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NancyMitch5

I have more of a problem with the speaker running the words together... can't even HEAR amigas.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/N6fbCMLh

Why do you have to ask the same question over and over again???

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bardiya9

is clase is femenine?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cyberhick
Cyberhick
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Yes

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeatriceOw1

My ans. Is rkght

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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Are you sure there wasn't a typo?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Debasish731654

What is the difference between Mucho and Muchas? Some one help por favor.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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muchas is the feminine plural form of the adjective (many). Mucho can be a couple things. It can be the singular masculine adjective. However, it can also be the adverb (to modify a verb.)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josefina446354

Many is the same a lot of -- mucho

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cantaloupe2

That implies all of the friends are female, right?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cyberhick
Cyberhick
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Yes, I believe amigos would be used for all men or a mix of both.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusk779496

I'm sorry, but I'm confused about whether you put the word muchas/muchos in front of the noun or behind the noun. I thought muchas/muchos is an adjective and adjectives are supposed to be put after noun in Spanish right?

Or are there exceptions?

Like if you say "I drink beer a lot" or "I drink a lot of beer"

Is the former "Bebo cerveza mucha" and the latter "Bebo mucha cerveza"?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlaaWageeh1

I wrote i have too many friens in this class instead of a lot and it was concidered wrong

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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It should be wrong. "Too many" is very different in meaning from "many," and it does not match the meaning of the Spanish sentence.

1 day ago
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