"¡Mucho gusto, señoras!"

Translation:Nice to meet you, ladies!

5 months ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kayla898831

It bother me that under "senoras" you have a list of acceptable words, though when I put down madames, which was a word that was apparently acceptable, the answer was incorrect. So was that word not meant to be there, or was the system wrong for counting me wrong? The world may never know, but I wanted to express my displeasure.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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They have taken it off the list. Once upon a time that could have been an alternate word, but nowadays the meaning for that word has changed in the USA. The hints are not all for every sentence. You should pick the best fit for the sentence, which in this case is now "ladies."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tedel16
Tedel16
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I wrote "it's a pleasure to meet you, ladies." and was marked wrong. Correct answer was "It's nice to meet you, ladies." I think my answer is closer to the meaning of "mucho gusto" than Duolingo's in this case. Will report

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lhmckown

That would be a good translation for "Es un placer conocerte, señoras."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DawnStarr4

In Spain, they say, "Encantada de concerte"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sevynn1

Well when they have the word highlighted an then defined, I think they want us to use the way they have it, which doesnt necessarily make sense.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trudy679058

I agree with Tede16, my humble understanding as a beginner.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“Pleasure to meet you, ladies!” is accepted as correct.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vlauntern

;)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaare259694

Ya I always use mucho gusto to mean with pleasure

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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With = con

“Mucho gusto” is shortened from the original phrase, “Mucho gusto conocerlo” (usted, masculine object), or “conocerla” (usted, feminine object), or “conocerte” (tú, object form). So it is used where we might say “Pleasure to meet you!”

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/H.S.StanVi
H.S.StanVi
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Glad, happy or pleasure to meet you are equally common means of expression and parallel the original spanish more closely than "nice" to. meet you and should have been accepted.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“Pleasure to meet you, ladies!” Is accepted as correct.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lincoln180952

OK, scratch my tirade - I put "pleasure to meet you" rather than "nice to meet you" to translate "mucho gusto" and lo and behold DUO accepted my use.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marciakiss1

I put "Glad to meet you" and was marked wrong.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chzlvr

why isn't ma'am accepted?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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"señoras" is plural and "ladies" is the best fit for this expression.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/panos86gr
panos86gr
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Isn't "señoritas" for "ladies"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CalebSyring

"Señora" is the equivalent of "Missus" while "Señorita" is the equivalent of "Miss" So, unless I am wrong, you could use either depending on the context.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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"señoritas" are "young ladies" or a formal term for "girls"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

señor + ita = señorita

A suffix is a letter or group of letters added at the end of a word which makes a new word.

Unlike English, Spanish contains a great many suffix endings ― many with idiomatic meanings ― that express a quality, such as smallness or ugliness. In many of these cases, in comparison with English, English speakers usually just employ an added word or make use of a different word instead of adding a suffix. In contrast, Spanish more often prefers to add a suffix. This is highly preferred.

For example, while English speakers might say “little house” or “cottage,” a Spanish speaker will say “casita.” The new word, casita, is formed by adding a suffix to the Spanish word, casa.

The new word might feasibly belong to a different word class in contrast with the original word. For example, the Spanish verb, conocer, can be modified into a noun by adding a suffix to the root of the verb.

conoc- + imiento = conocimiento

All of the foregoing discussion is leading to my point. My point is that we don't want to underestimate the addition of a suffix. A suffix is not necessarily just a tiny modification. Watch out (listen carefully) or you might overlook something.

Edited: Is the speaker using the term, señorita, in the sense of a younger woman; or is the speaker using the term in the sense of unmarried; or is the speaker using the term in the sense of professional courtesy; or is the speaker addressing you as señorito or señorita because the speaker is your servant? Or perhaps the speaker is some other kind of subordinate. Or perhaps you are a 'junior' in the organization you belong to.
http://dle.rae.es/?id=XcT6x6x

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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You must realize how the culture is to understand this. It was originally assumed that single women are young ladies and teaching has long been a profession that was originally for young unmarried women. Yes, “señorita” can also mean “Miss”. It is not used to mean “ladies” in general. It can be used for a group of ladies that you know are single, but assuming that an older lady is single if it is unknown is a cultural misstep. In English, it is okay to use “young ladies” with single older women as if you can’t imagine that their age is very much. I would love to hear from a native speaker about this.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@panos86gr

señorita

I am presenting only two of the definitions I copied from the Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) web site. This term is used as a feminine noun in these two senses of the term that I am presenting. On the other hand, the term is modified to señorito when it is used as a masculine noun.

4. f. Usado como tratamiento de cortesía aplicado a la mujer soltera.
― Used as a courtesy treatment applied to single women.

5. f. Usado como tratamiento de cortesía que se da a maestras de escuela, profesoras, o también a otras muchas mujeres que desempeñan algún servicio, como secretarias, empleadas de la administración o del comercio, etc.
― Used as a courtesy treatment given to school teachers, professors, or also to many other women who perform a service, such as secretaries, administrative or commercial employees, etc.

http://dle.rae.es/?id=XcT6x6x

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuvieCantu1

I'm curious about the "Masculine" use before the "senoras.".....Seems that in many sentences or questions we are marked wrong if we do not apply the correct gender by placing the o or a towards the end of words.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
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"gusto" is a masculine noun that "mucho" is describing. If you were saying "many ladies", then it would be "muchas señoras."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

excellent post!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lincoln180952

Please correct the possible translations and/or use of "Mucho Gusto" as limiting the correct answer to "nice to meet you" even though that is ONE correct way defies the actual use of the words throughout the Spanish speaking world. Think of old movies, suave gentlemen and the polite "It's a pleasure" when introduced to a gentlelady. "Nice to meet you" just doesn't fit the language used by GENTLEMEN / CABALLEROS !!!!!!!!

ps - my last communication FROM DUO was JUNE 29 - OK, maybe I am on their "toxic" list but right is right and I keep trying to learn - I'm up to 859 days.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“Pleasure to meet you” is also accepted as correct. If you feel that “It’s a pleasure” should also be accepted as correct, then you should report it through the report button.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger654478

Howdy ladies was marked wrong!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EchoZulu70

how about 'Nice meeting you, ladies! '?

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Sometimes Duolingo accepts “So nice to meet you”, your version sounds as though you are parting now while the other version is still allowing for more talk, because they are shortened from “ It is nice to meet you.” and “It was nice meeting you.”

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveNewhouse

I said.. mucho gusto senores because that is what I heard. It should be correct even though they wanted the feminine form. correct?

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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No, “Señoras” and “Señores” do not sound the same. Practice listening to native speakers here:
https://forvo.com/search/se%c3%b1oras%20se%c3%b1ores/

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveNewhouse

i understand they are different. that doesnt fix the audio issue though.....i will check the site. variety is good

2 days ago
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