"Nosotros queremos caminar en la tarde."

Translation:We want to walk in the afternoon.

5 months ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/motosrojas

Why is it 'We would like to walk'? 'Querríamos' is 'we would like to' Souldn't this translate as 'We like to walk'

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikeylee48

"We like to walk in the afternoon" is "nos gusta caminar por la tarde"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

No, motosrojas, "querríamos" translates to "would want." "Would like to" is a colloquial secondary meaning.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinMendo122951

how do you differentiate in spanish between "we want to walk in the afternoon" vs. "we like to walk in the afternoon"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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For like you need to use the verb gustar.

E.g. 'Nosotros gustamos caminar en la tarde. or 'Nos gusta caminar por la tarde.'

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The first sentence doesn't work. The English counterpart would be a messy "We are liked walking in the evening."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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RyagonIV: Like you, I am a learner, but I see no problems with either sentence.
Can you please give your reasoning.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Gustar translates as "to please" or "to be liked"; it works basically backwards compared to the English "to like". So "Nosotros gustamos" means "We are liked". "Caminar en la tarde" would be the object in the Spanish sentence, so the subject in the English "to like" sentence: "Walking in the evening likes us"/"We are liked by walking in the evening".

It could be a grammatically proper, albeit weird Spanish sentence, but in that case it misses the a in front of caminar (and probably an article), since gustar only takes indirect objects.

  • (A nosotros) nos gusta caminar en la tarde. - We like walking in the evening.
  • (Nosotros) (le) gustamos al caminar en la tarde. - Walking in the evening likes us.
3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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Ryan: Thanks for your response.

Can you also explain why this site and this site and this site all say 'Nosotros gustamos caminar en la tarde.' means 'We like to walk in the evening/afternoon.'?

If these sites, which language learners rely on for faithful translations, are wrong, where do you suggest we go to get accurate translations?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Those websites use automatic translators. Basically, the computer is just making its best guess as to what a sentence could mean. These translators work out the rules of how a language works based on a large database of natural English sentences and their Spanish translations. That means, they only work (relatively) well if you ask them to translate natural sentences. If you feed them a nonsense sentence, like "Nosotros gustamos caminar", they'll try to make sense of it based on the data they have, which is either too little to make a good guess, or is too far away from your sentence to be reliable.

Automatic translators are good tools for learning, but you need to use them responsibly. One, you can feed them a natural foreign sentence you find in a text to help you grasp the meaning, which you then can use to re-analyse that foreign sentence for how it is built up. For example, in this story that I've been reading (stories are wonderful for learning, by the way), there is the sentence

"¿O es que nunca se trató de ella sino de la humillación que sentiste al no poder salvarla?"

First guess: "Or is it that (she never tried?), but the humiliation that you felt not being able to save her?" Okay, why "se trató de ella"? Go to Google Translate and put it in, you'll receive:

"Or is it that it was never about her but about the humiliation you felt at not being able to save her?"

So it's not "se trató de ella", but rather "se trató" - "it was (about)", and "de ella o de la humillación" - "about her or about the humiliation". "Tratarse de algo" means "to be about something" or "regarding something", which I now learnt and can compare with a dictionary entry.

The other way you can use automatic translators is to guide you in a direction when you're translating something to the foreign language. But for the aforementioned reasons, you have to be critical about the result, especially if it's a more unlikely sentence. Let's look at something like "I had this pot which I used to cook soup." Google Translate gives me:

"Tuve esta olla que solía cocinar sopa."

Sounds good, no? But wait, what's solía? Shouldn't the sentence contain something like usar when I'm saying "to use"? Looking into a dictionary again, solía comes from the verb soler, which means "to usually do", and in imperfect tense becomes "used to (do)". Aha, it's the wrong "used to" construction. If you click on the sentence, you get an alternative translation shown:

"Tenía esta olla que he usado para cocinar sopa."

Which is much closer to what we want. I would probably say "Tenía esta olla que usaba para cocinar sopa", using the imperfect to express that I repeatedly cooked soup in that pot.

To get accurate translation, I want to recommend Reverso Context. (If you make an account, you can see all the translations.) Reverso actually contains the literature sentences and translated counterparts that the automatic translators base their algorithms on. So these are (almost) all natural expressions. The downside is, of course, that it doesn't contain every possible sentence, so you will have some puzzle work to do, but it's perfect for looking up idiomatic expressions. Linguee is another service in that vein, but I don't like it as much, because it mostly uses translations of news and law stuff, which don't use the most natural ways of wording things.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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Ryan: Thanks for your comprehensive reply. Reverso will now be my 'go to' site for translations. I'll give Linguee a crack too.

Have a lingot or two or more (I know they're almost worthless, but it's the thought that counts, no?)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Thank you. I'm glad you appreciate the feedback. That makes it already worth it. :)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FernandoCP.
FernandoCP.
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"Nosotros queremos caminar POR la tarde" sounds more natural to me.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenDixon9

Where did the "would" come from in the "correct" answer?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Querríamos" is Spanish conditional tense and is conjugated with "would" as part of the meaning of the root word "want."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chris610088

Why not the evening?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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Both afternoon and evening are valid and should be accepted.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janke53
Janke53
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Why here than nosotros before queremos ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DefyLimitations

Did it previously accept "We would like to walk in the afternoon"? I put that, and it was counted wrong (corrected to "we want...").

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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According to earlier comments, it was accepted at some point. I don't recommend using that translation, though. Querer is "to want". "Would like to" is a conditional form, gustaría.

1 month ago
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