"Ustedes tienen que caminar derecho en esta calle."

Translation:You have to walk straight on this street.

5 months ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Deb1134
Deb1134
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You have to walk straight, because if you walk crooked people will assume you have had too much to drink.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kat328570

While amusing, your remark points out the problem with this translation. I would say "you have to walk straight ahead..." which avoids the confusion (but eliminates a good pun).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Philg42
Philg42
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or straight along this street

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

Duo accepted exactly that for me today. (8/8/2018)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardWallace0

"You have to walk straight along this street" - not accepted. (14th Sept 2018)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pobble01
pobble01
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I've put just "ahead" because that is the form I have always used as a native english English speaker. Reported

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmokrator

When giving directions, you would tell someone to go "ahead" in stead of "straight"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca126402

I believe he would have said "straight ahead". I think it would help if we put the entire sentence we wrote when using this forum. We're confused enough already (or, at least, I am!).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

Duo does accept "straight ahead". At least now--11/17/2018

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boccanegra0

Alternatively: You have to walk straight (no mincing) on this street (because it is full of homophobes).

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TroyStaver

I thought derecho only meant right. Linea is straight. Is this correct?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superfrog101
superfrog101
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"Derecha" does means right. "Derecho", however, is a different word that means "straight" when used as an adverb. As far as I know, "línea" only means "line". Maybe you were thinking of the word "lineal", which can be translated as "linear" or "straight"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neymarinet

thanks mate, been getting "derecho/a" mixed up for so long.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

"Derecho" means many different things just like the English word "right" does. As superfrog101, writes above, when used as an adverb it means "straight ahead".
BUT it ALSO means the direction "right" when used with a masculine noun.
"Right foot" is "pie derecho".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicSal294966

Thats not confusing at all... I anticipate getting this wrong plenty of times

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PontusKihl
PontusKihl
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Right on! Derecho sobre!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Derecho has several meanings, but as far as directions are concerned, I've always understood it to mean to go straight.

http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=derecho

Línea recta is a straight line but I don't think it would be used in the context of giving or getting directions.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chuckdumas

A good article on derechO / derechA here:

https://www.thoughtco.com/derecho-and-derecha-3079578

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca126402

Thanks for the link. So much information out there!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

A language where derecho means straight and derecha means right? ¡Ay madre!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmokrator

I think it makes some sense, despite being horribly easily misunderstood if you just call out single words like "left", "right", or "straight". But English has a similar problem with directions, in that we say "right" to mean both "turn to the right" and "that is correct". Speaking of "correct" and "right", I'm reminded of English usage of the phrase "straight and narrow" which is to say "the right path" or even "the righteous path". It seems English connects both the right direction and going straight with being correct. If I recall correctly, that comes from Latin, so it would make sense that Spanish also suffers from the confusion.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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It does come from Latin. The right was considered virtuous and the left, evil; right-handed people were dexterous, while lefties were sinister.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chase579529

I put you all instead of you and it marked it wrong??? WHY

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yodajmdod3
Yodajmdod3
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Had the same problem it should be accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh788272

'You all' sounds slang to me and I cannot recall ever using it - maybe because I am old and English?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alhujazi

I understood that derecho also means "a right" in terms of societal rights. "Tengo el derecho para hablar": "I have the right to speak". Does this sound correct, or am I off base?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susan511353

Derecho is straight. Derecha is right. Minor difference in spelling, but different word meaning.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

It's not that simple.
Derecho means "straight ahead". And just like the English version of the word it also means "privilege" or "freedom". As in a "human right".
BUT it still means the direction "right" if it is describing a masculine noun. As in "El futbolista se lastimó el pie derecho."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RioGrande4

First time I haven't been allowed to translate "ustedes" to "y'all." That's the correct translation, y'all.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susan511353

Interesting. Many times I have used "you all" and been counted correct (yes, it's a southern thing but I defend it since English has no plural you) and have actually been counted incorrect when I didn't translate an "ustedes" to "you guys"....and yet this time, I used "you all" and was counted incorrect. Consistency, Duolingo!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DyN1pnHO

how about straight down this road?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DodoJarmann
DodoJarmann
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Calle is street, carretera is road.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kveebee

Derecho means straight (ahead), derecha means right; got it!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

Yes and no. It is not that simple. Please, look at my above explanation.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisDavie19

I reckon about a third of these translations into english are phrases that would never be used, at least not in england. Im having to learn american as well as spanish. Lol

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SHT3z2e4
SHT3z2e4
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También puedes decir, "caminar hacia adelante," o tiene eso un significado diferente?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

"Adelante, siempre adelante.." From "Marianela" meaning "Onward, always onward..."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucas224557

This translation is obfuscated.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dads.Spanish

I just wonder en can also mean in anf if we translate in this street..., it's a rather strange sentence, is it likely that it would actually be used by a native Spanish speaker?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gregpeeler
gregpeeler
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in, on, along, and even down should all be accepted in my opinion. I was marked wrong for using in this street instead of on.

3 weeks ago
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