https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie2921

Should I learn Chinese or French?

Hello everyone! My name is Ellie and I'm 16 years old. I'm a native Greek speaker and recently I obtained the ECPE Michigan proficiency degree in English. I'm thinking now, to start a second language (mainly for job opportunities). The thing is, I'm so indecisive. I really can't decide which language I should learn. To start with, I LOVE the French culture and the French language in general (this pronunciation is so awesome. I wish I could wake up tomorrow and have a French accent), so that's why I initially started learning French. France is such a romantic country and I'm helpless romantic as well, so yeah. I stopped for a while though, after a short period of time I started, because I had exams in school and I wanted to focus there. Now, that my exams finished I'm thinking to start taking lessons again. However, I have some qualms if I should continue french or give up and start another language, due to the hardness of the pronunciation. I have a major difficulty in pronouncing some specific letters and that's so so discouraging.No matter how hard I try, I can not see any improvement in terms of this. I'm afraid i have started losing interest due to that. I do not know if it's just a matter of time to attain a decent pronunciation (i really doubt it in my case) or if indeed, even after years I will still not be able to pronounce these letters, so yeah. I'm now confused! What should I do? I have the time and the mood to go for another language but which one? Should I give one more try to French? or go for another language which has easier pronunciation? Like Chinese, for example. I find it quite appealing that the handwriting is different and all. The idea of learning it seems so tempting. I really wanna give it a try. Even if I'm not into Chinese music or movies or culture in general, I think that over time I'll start liking it etc. What is more, as far as I'm concerned, it would probably be beneficial to me to a great extent if I knew Chinese and I would have a major advantage in the job market. To put in in another way, almost no one knows Chinese in my country, so yeah. I know it's one of the most difficult languages to learn, if not the most difficult, but I'm eager to put the effort. I do not care to study hard as far as the pronunciation is not a trouble like it's in French. So, what are your thoughts? What would you do if you were me? Every opinion is helpful! Thank you.

Btw: Just in case it has any importance, in the future, I probably wanna study education or psychology. Or history, maybe. I'm not sure yet hahaha. ( indecisive and for that.....) It will certainly go for something theoretical tho.

May 27, 2018

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/El_Gusano

I understand French pronunciation is a little difficult. The truth is, most of us non-native French speakers will never get beyond speaking French with an accent. I would suggest learning more words and phrases, watch videos and listen to French just to develop an ear and repeat what you can. If your goal is to speak it with the same accent as a native speaker, you are setting yourself up for failure. Aim to speak well enough to be understood, and that will relieve you of a great burden.

As far as whether to learn Chinese, I can't say it's good or bad. But you're likely to have pronunciation problems there as well while you would have to learn words, grammar, AND a new writing system, which alone makes Chinese one of the most difficult languages on the planet. I'm not saying don't do it, but if you're getting frustrated with a language you were interested in, you're not going to fix that by picking a more difficult language you have less interest in. Not to mention, there are NO words in Chinese that resemble any words in French, English, or Greek.

I would suggest staying in French and breaking up your goals into more manageable chunks to see more progress, but that's just me. Good luck!

May 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GloriadeGudalupe

Grammatically Chinese is a childish language! But of course learning the sounds and the characters is a challenge. Do you think that Russian or Hebrew is easier than Chinese... I do not think so. Hebrew is completely another alphabet and the sounds are not familiar neither and is written from right to left and the grammar can be complicate. So I really think that Chinese made it easier for me by not having a difficult grammar!

May 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/fallingleaf_271

Chinese, definitely. It is way more widely spoken than French.

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GloriadeGudalupe

Well... Chinese has some 1.3 billion people speaking the language and now they seem to be going out all over the world! I picked up this language. I am doing also French and I found that the pronunciation when you are relating it to the writing improves with times of repetition. Good luck!

May 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie2921

Thank you! :)

May 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlieLee707393

Both. No doubt.

May 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Stella0217

I wouldn't worry about perfecting your accent. There are many people who've been speaking a second language for decades and still have an accent, especially if they learned it later in life. You don't need to have a true French accent in order to be conversationally fluent in French. I would just trust your gut instinct here. Even if you start a language and quit before you reach fluency, you'll still have learned more than if you never started at all!

May 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Dani_lem

Maybe you should try both, but choosing chinese as a long term goal

May 29, 2018
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