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"La universidad está cerca de aquí."

Translation:The university is near here.

4 months ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JesseA77en

"The university is near here" is marked as correct, while "The university is close to here" is marked as incorrect.

Both should be correct.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lidibell

I agree. "Close to" is even given as an option in the drop down.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikeylee48

"close to here" is accepted 8/6/18

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pendares

it is accepted now

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lostcry
lostcry
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I've always learned you can't put a preposition in front of an adverb, like we say "come here, go down, nudge forward", but not "come to here, go to down, nudge to forward"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffLucco

Thats what I put and still got it wrong 9-16-18

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RNOT3X

why isn't it close from here

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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That would be cerca desde aquí.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilyJRobinson

That's bad English. It should be "close TO here"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Close from here" is just another way to express "not far from here".

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allan152368

Why does it use 'esta' and not 'es'? I thought 'estar' is used to describe temporary states, e.g. 'la nina esta feliz hoy' - the girl is happy today

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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The "temporary/permanent" understanding of ser/estar is useful, but not a strict rule. It comes from the fact that feelings use estar and characteristics use ser, and in this meaning of the two the estar is temporary and ser is permanent. However, there are other uses of both that have nothing to do with how long something is done.

One is location. Location uses estar. It has nothing to do with temporary/permanent. "Es" is only used for locations of events, like where something is happening at the moment. A party, or a concert. So, with place the meaning is actually the opposite. Ser is for where temporary events are happening, and estar is for simply stating location.

Another example is facts. "son los cinco y media." "It is 5:30" This is, of course, temporary, but we still use ser.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allan152368

Thank you for your helpful explanation, Nick.

I've just noticed that the Duolingo App on an iPad includes grammar notes, but on my desktop where I usually do my Duolingo sessions, you can't see those notes. The grammar notes for this one, 'Travel 3', explains about estar for location. I'll have to make sure I get to see the grammar notes!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnerbeginner

I heard when talking about locations, use estar.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noelkeane
noelkeane
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I agree totally. DL is starting to frustrate me. It didnt used to be like this.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria415107

We're not even halfway finished yet ;)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Pr
Nick_Pr
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A lot of these lessons are new. The more people go through them and report alternate answers, the better it will be. It's a free online course--you get what you pay for.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnerbeginner

I wrote, the university is close from here, marked as wrong.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OhMissJamie

I have a question about the "está" in this sentence. My understanding is that "ser" is used for unchanging states of being. For example, "I am tall (implied: and I always will be)." Conversely, "estar" is used for changing states of being, for example "it is cloudy (implied: at the moment, but it isn't always cloudy".

So, my question is: why is está used here when the location of a building is a fixed state? Wouldn't the university always be nearby here? Is it just an exception to the rule? Or do I not understand the rule accurately? Thanks for your help.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allan152368

Hi OhMissJamie, I asked the same question recently, and got a good answer. Have a look at the discussion just above your question.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

because estar is used for locations---all locations (but not appointments/ events). ´ser´does not cover locations (except events) whatever their permanency.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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And then you have those little gems like "Nuestra casa es aquí." :)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victor472772

It should be the universitiy is near by or not far away from here

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Nearby" is one word (and should be accepted as such).

"Not far away from here" is a very indirect translation of "cerca de aquí". A closer one would be "no muy lejos de aquí".

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RChandrasekar

Close to here is marked right but sounds unnatural

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnerbeginner

English has a lot more prepositions than in Spanish.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itsjustkoopa

spanish is so hard all yall prob beastin this

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FriedLemon

Should, the university is near from here, be correct?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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No, that sounds weird. You usually don't put a preposition after "near", since "near" is already a preposition. Just "near here" is enough. Also possible:

  • close to here
  • nearby
  • closeby
3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Toria54

Is "cerca de aquí" more correct than "cerca aquí" for "near (or nearby) here"? I thought some earlier examples in this section didn't use the "de", and I don't remember that expression from the previous time I did the Travel section.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Cerca aquí" is incorrect. If you're using cerca to say "close to [something]", you need to use the de. Cerca itself is only an adverb (most closely translating to "close" or "closeby"), but if you want to use it with a noun or pronoun, you need a preposition instead. That's the purpose of the de.

  • La escuela está cerca. - The school is close.
  • La escuela está cerca de aquí. - The school is close to here.
  • La policia siempre está cerca aquí. - The police is always nearby here. (Not "close to this place" but "in this place, they are close".)
1 week ago