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  5. "Este restaurante tiene arroz…

"Este restaurante tiene arroz muy bueno."

Translation:This restaurant has very good rice.

May 29, 2018

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuhailBanister

In Spain at least, "arroz" doesn't just refer to a dish of the white stuff by itself. It can also be a kind of stew where the rice is cooked with vegetables, seafood, chorizo, and other cuts of meat. Though it might have started out as a means to deal with leftovers, "arroz," when done right, can be quite a feast and not a cheap date at all!

Growing up with Minute-Rice, it is easy for us gringos to forget that in other cultures, rice is a very big deal and the subject of endless conaisseurship and outright snobery, not only in the Spanish-speaking world, but in the Middle East ("arroz" comes from Arabic "ar-ruz") and South Asia (where those overpriced packets of basmati come from)--to say nothing of East Asia itself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisGiofreda

Ah, so "arroz" can refer to that delicious paella I had in Madrid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisGiofreda

Someone is a cheap date.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngridSchau

i'm gonna assume that it didn't accept 'nice rice' because of the awesome rhyme


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Animator

I put "nice rice" instead of "good rice" marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyrtonFry3

"This restaurant has very nice rice" marked wrong 3rd September.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yhtxYRtd

Same 18th February.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alessandro_o

same 14th of April


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boris.cukic

Same 20th of April


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gaby.daviesx

same 27th of May


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosRossi2

difference between "bueno" and "bien"? Living in NM, USA, "bueno" is a common expression but we've always been led to believe it to be slang


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

'Bueno' is an adjective, and is used to describe nouns.

'Bien' is an adverb, and is used to modify verbs.

The confusion most likely comes from English, where we often say "good" instead of "well". (For example, "I'm doing good.") Other languages don't generally blur the distinction the way we do, except possibly as slang.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClauLeu

I dont understand why "the restaurant has ..." Is incorrect and i need to write"has got".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilyMor26

this restuarant has very good rice

does Duolingo mark you wrong for what I'd say is clearly a typo? what else could I mean other than 'restaurant'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamryn214620

Right damn auto correct now fixes some of my english words to the spanish version. So damn Irritating


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stsmith50

I wrote"this restaurant has really good rice" and Duo marked it wrong. Come on Duo, don't be so petty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daph732007

I did the same. Who says very good rice.......i would say this rice is really good which should mean a translation of this restaurant has really good rice should be valid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex-Ri

I wrote "a very good rice". I'm not native English but why the hell with "a" it was narked wrong? Don't you say "it's A good rice"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angela_McDonald

No, English doesn't say 'a rice', but 'some rice'. I guess because it is lots of tiny pieces of rice, no one eats just one piece.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Super_Duo_Lingo

Would you say, that 'a very good rice' is wrong in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin259513

Yes, in English you would either say "very good rice" or "some really good rice". The Spanish said "arroz muy bueno," so the English would be "very good rice."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emmanuelle34892

Same here. It should have been accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathy837384

Why este instead of está?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisGiofreda

Great question. "Esta" is for feminine words, "este" for masculine, and the rarer "esto" handles everything else. "Restaurante" is masculine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosRossi2

note the difference between "esta" (without accent) and "está" (with accent). different words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielDarn5

There is absolutely no way for an English speaking person to differentiate the difference in the two pronunciations. They both sound exactly the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margarita613437

It is difference. The lector says esta with accent like estaaa. Without accent they say just short "esta".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margarita613437

But I have just notice if they speak fast I cant hear a difference.... Spanish often speak fast, LoL So, practice in listening. Spanish is easy, very easy :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TKDgirl94

It said it was 'great rice', not 'good rice.' They mean the same thing! Just one is more enthusiastic. I guess I'm not feeling very enthusiastic today. ;P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LittauJoAnna

What's wrong with "really good" as compared to "very good" --that's how people talk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anticorncob28

Seriously? I though restaurante was a masculine noun, but I listened closely a few times and swear I heard "esta" so typed it in and then got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melissa424404

i understand esta is feminine and este is masculine, so when do i use "esto"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NatalieBur356749

Rice makes everything good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielDarn5

This particular question is super ambiguous! Couldn't you be saying "that" restaurant instead of "this" restaurant? Despite whether the word "restaurant" is masculine or feminine? What am I missing here? Doesn't "este" translate to "this" and esta translate to that? "This" can only be feminine and "that" can only be masculine? It makes no sense and I will never get this one right…so annoying!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin259513

The way to remember it is "this and these both have t's". Este and esta mean this and estes and estas mean these, while ese and esa mean that and eses and esas mean those. Also aquel, and aquella mean "that" further away than eses and esas and aquellos and aquellas mean "those" further away.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guireis91

"This restaurant has a really goos rice" should also be accepted as a valid response!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Igor779757

Correct answer was declared for incorect?

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