1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "Leave me alone."

"Leave me alone."

Translation:Lass mich in Ruhe.

May 30, 2018

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1830

Lass mich allein? (It was not acepted)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raisinnoir

"Lass mich allein" could mean the person wants to be alone. "Lass mich in Ruhe" suggests the person doesn't want to be bothered.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlakem

Then why was "lass mich allein" marked wrong ? The question said 'alone' . I did not say 'in rest ' or 'in peace' or I dont want to be bothered.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1830

Looks like they want the same figurative rather than literal meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Big_See

Regardless of which they intended, I believe a sentence should be marked as correct if it makes grammatical sense - as someone confirmed above - and no context is given.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chooch639215

What is 'hyper literal" about translating leave me alone and not leave me in peace, when the rest of this entire website is based on literal translations? No obvious context should not mean penalizing someone for not "getting" the assumed context, while still answering grammatically correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/japadley

Their goal is to teach functional connotative language understanding. Hyper-literal translations that fail to capture the connotative meaning of the prompt and wouldn't be understood as such by a native speaker do nobody any good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David215844

Precisely - 'Leave me alone' was the phrase to be translated. Why is 'the use of 'allein' wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Benjamen89

Agreed, if they wanted only this meaning they should have added context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Necnom

Most of the time, I agree with Duo marking right or wrong different possible translation choices. Usually the distinction between what should be only translated literally, what could be translated with idioms, etc., are pretty fair to me. However, this time, I have to agree with you. I cannot explain why it's not accepted. "Lass mich allein" is a pretty fair and correct translation for "Leave me alone".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosiahSchm5

Why is "Lass mich alleine" (alone) not accepted? To a native English speaker like myself, that seems a more accurate translation than "in Ruhe" (in peace).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 216

It is indeed a more literal translation, but it's not the usual way of how it is expressed in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexiuscomnenus

So then why doesn't the question ask for 'leave me in peace?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 216

For reverse translating the German sentence "Lass mich in Ruhe", "Leave me in peace" is indeed one of the accepted options. But here we are looking for a German translation of the English sentence "Leave me alone". And for this one, "Lass mich in Ruhe" is far more common than the literal translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanMSpencer

Silly, leave me alone and leave me in peace exist in both languages and have the same sense, yet Duo wants to point one of them at the other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chooch639215

Lass mich allein.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheDreadfulGuy

''Lass mich allein(e)'' should be accepted to...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doug595080

I agree that "Lass mich allein" is a non-contextual alternative and should be accepted. In English, "Leave me alone" can either mean "Stop bothering me", which doesn't mean that the speaker wants to be alone -- he or she could be in a room full of people -- Or to literally leave him alone, to get out of his room, house, space, whatever. so that he or she is the only person there.

I can only guess that DuoLingo doesn't accept "Lass mich allein" because this is under the subject "feelings".

So, "I need my privacy. Leave me alone." doesn't constitute feelings, while "For Heaven's sake, I'm trying to read the newspaper, and can't do that while you're asking questions. Leave me alone." represents annoyance -- a feeling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birgiteden

I grew up saying lass mir allein. It should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 216

It should of course not. There are some dialects (e.g. in Berlin) that have dative here, but this is not standard language (Hochdeutsch), which is taught here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelHun729358

Lass mich in Ruhe.

LEAVE ME IN PEACE!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveDingal

I know there is not article preceding "Ruhe", but if there was, will it become "im Ruhe"? Dative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 216

If there were an article, it would be "in der Ruhe", because it is indeed dative and "Ruhe" is feminine.
But, like in English, in this expression there is no article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosettaY

Why is it not possible to translate: "Lass mich allein". I think, that this German translation corresponds better to the English sentence. I have reported it. Maybe it was not accepted, because I used "laß"?

Edit: No, "Lass mich allein" is also not accepted and how I see in the forum since one year not. I have reported it again as "my answer should be accepted"! That is a correct expression in the German language and the translation "Lass mich in Frieden" would better correspond to the English sentence: "Let me in peace".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissShelve

Lousy translation. Should be leave me in peace.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveHawley

According to Google Translate, alleine is an acceptable word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Necnom

Google translate could be right, however I would not use it as a relevant reference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaileyBruc3

When one gives an acceptable answer, even if not the popular version, one should get credit. The exercise of language is fluid and Duo does a great job forging a path through the labyrinth of possibilities and doing so in the light---revealing the idiosyncratic, the formal, and the unusual in addition to the strict rules of grammar, usage, connotation and intonation---and regularly promotes good sense and patience. Where there is room for credit, allow it. It will diminish the hardship of learning. The standards need not be abandoned, they are vital and should be noted, but this example is not worth the fuss.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vkilohani

Why not "Lass mich in dem Ruhe"?

I don't understand where to use the article and where not to use it...seems a bit arbitrary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 216

"in dem Ruhe" is ungrammatical, because "Ruhe" is feminine, so it would be "in der Ruhe".
But you don't use an article in this expression, just like you don't say "leave me in the peace" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vkilohani

Ah yes, thanks, makes sense.

But, couple of lessons back, Duo gave a translation of "Thoughts are free" as "Die Gedanken sind frei." This begs the question as to where the article is needed and where it is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 216

Well, English and German often use the article the same way. But there are some exceptions. The most prominent ones are:
for abstract terms (love, time, ...) and seasons English usually doesn't use the definite article, but in German it is often mandatory.
For giving professions English uses the indefinite article ("I am a teacher"), whereas German (and many other languages) doesn't.

In this particular case both "Gedanken" and "die Gedanken" would work, but "die Gedanken sind frei" is a famous quotation from a song.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vkilohani

Thanks, this was useful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Necnom

Both are grammatically correct, "Gedanken sind", and "Die Gedanken sind", but your example is an idiomatic expression, and what is commonly said is "Die Gedanken sind frei". My experience lets me think that Idiomatic Expressions are not the best examples to use for other translations ;) It's better then to refer to literal translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vkilohani

Okay, so idioms can be pretty idiosyncratic, is it? And elsewhere normal grammar applies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Necnom

Not always, some idioms can be so strong that all the other forms won't be used, even if grammatically correct. What I meant previously is that using an idiomatic expression (e.g Die Gedanken sind frei) in order to help translate another idiomatic expression (e.g Lass mich in Ruhe) is risky, often difficult, and won't always help understand the reasons why some sentences are structured this way or so. But mostly, grammar rules applies to idioms too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 216

"normal gammar" is not the same in English and German. The use of articles often is similar, but there are prominent cases where they are not. See one of my other comments on this page.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/__Larry__

Why one says Immer mit der Ruhe with a definite article but in Ruhe without one? Is there a rule for using Ruhe with or without articles?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 216

There is no explanation for why idioms are like they are.

Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.