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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

I'm a native speaker:)

I'm a native speaker of Japanese.

I rarely see native Japanese speakers here, so I thought it would be fun to post a new thread here:D

Not being a teacher or anything, I'm not necessarily good at explaining grammars and stuffs (you know what I mean, it is quite difficult to teach your mother tongue because you have naturally acquired that language.).

But I'll do my best to answer the questions. Please feel free to ask me if you have any!

May 30, 2018

127 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiffany-Le

Hi Maiko,

Thnx for the offer. It's a shame that Duolingo doesn't show users native language(s). Would make it easier to reach out and ask things.

Just saw you are learning Dutch. If you need any help, I'm Belgian so I can help with that ;)

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thank you for your kind words:) Yeah, I've just started learning Dutch, so I really appreciate your offer<3

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

I'd be very interested to know a bit about how a native speaker such as yourself feels about the kanji. Do you often find yourself having to revise some, or look them up? What do you think is the best way to learn them?

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Kanji is REALLY hard for us, too! I mean, it's serious.

We start learning kanji when we enter elementary school and we have kanji exams like every week. And it continues until we graduate high school. Sounds tough, doesn't it? We keep writing all those kanjis like crazy to preparing for exams.

Also, we have kanji dictionary and I believe everybody owns one. For me, a dictionary is not needed because I learned kanjis used in daily life, tho. About 2,000 kanjis are categorized into the ones used for daily use, so once you learn them you basically don't have any problems in your daily life.

Best ways to learn kanji are a) keep writing and b) reading stuffs. It is difficult to actually learn how to write kanjis without writing, but reading is always helpful to learn how to read kanjis. Even for native speakers, it quite often happens like "Oh I know how to read it but can't write it".

You don't put yourself under pressure too much. Learning all the kanjis is IMPOSSIBLE even for native speakers. So take it easy!

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fallen_Black

Is Duolingo accurate?

June 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lernejano

How do the Japanese people tend to feel about foreigners learning Japanese?

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

I believe people think it's cool. It's really nice that somebody from other countries have interests in our country language-wise.

Actually I'm surprised that you all put your heart into learning Japanese and very happy to know that.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rizu-Chan

I've heard that in Japan overall people are usually encouraging towards foreigners in helping them learn their things and traditions; though I've never visited so I don't know how accurate those statements are. Still it seems to be a common consensus whenever I see people talking about the topic that Japanese people are very open to sharing their culture with others, and like to see people putting in the right effort to learn it correctly.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Yes, I believe so.

We are always ready to welcome people from other countries. It feels good that they are interested in our culture and decide to take some time to actually come visit here:)

Hope you'll visit here someday soon!

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KraequhoS

I went to Japan in February, that was an awesome experience ! Even if someone doesn't speak any English, he tries his best to help you. And it works wherever you are: restaurant, street, taxi, shop, ... I do speak a little bit of Japanese and understand around 200 Kanjis so I tried to express/understand myself before swapping to English and they were really comprehensive! I went to Sendai, Kyoto, Osaka and Tokyo, I don't know if the place has its extent but I'd rather think Japanese people are simply nice :)

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thank you for sharing your experience here in Japan!

Japanese tend to lack of confidence in speaking English, but we never fail to do our best to communicate with those who can't speak Japanese.

Knowing 200 kanjis is ah-mazing! And I'm glad you travels around a few cities here.

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruel-Stroud

By your experience as a native, do you think it is worth studying Japanese as to opening opportunities in your country?

I have certain impressions, that it is difficult to get a passport to work in Japan, it seems that it is not important to know the language, many say to be a waste of time and getting unskilled jobs in Japan is almost impossible.

Studying Japanese has been a huge challenge and I'm not sure as to the cost benefit, I do not intend to use my expertise to watch animes for the rest of my life ....

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

I am sorry but I really have no idea about how to work or get visa? to work here.

But generally speaking, if you are considering living in Japan, having the basic knowledge of Japanese is a must, I think. I don't think lots of Japanese speak English very fluently. (Of course they are many, but majority of Japanese don't speak English.) I believe you'll naturally acquire Japanese if you live here, tho.

Hope you'll get an opportunity to work here someday:)

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rizu-Chan

Nice to meet you Maiko! Personally I know English and Spanish fluent, so if you ever have any questions about those feel free to ask! :)

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Nice to meet you too and thank you for your offer. Actually I've been studying Spanish on Memrise (not here for some reason xd) so I'd appreciate if you could teach me Spanish!

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rizu-Chan

Any questions you have just let me know and I'll answer to the best of my ability! :D

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandeepbalan

Rizu-Chan sometimes it feels so hard to understand whether a word is either masculine or feminine in espanol in order to use El and la in front of it. . I only take lessons once in a while. Any tips or some standards out there to follow for non speakers?

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rizu-Chan

Oh man, there's honestly no distinct rule that I can remember, except learning beforehand what "gender" the item has. Often words ending with "-a" will be female, and those with "-on" will be male:

"la silla, el camión, la lampara, el sillón"

Of course there are always exceptions, such as "el agua" and "el mapa" :'D

It's something we even struggle with sometimes. Although the word heat is technically masculine in Spanish ("el calor") it's not uncommon for native Spanish speakers to say "la calor" instead from time to time.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iGotNo_Scope

el agua is actually feminine tho

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rizu-Chan

Never said water wasn't feminine, I said it is an exception to the usual rules for feminine words. ;)

Feminine words normally use "la" but water, although feminine, uses "el" instead as if it was a male word.

Learning the gender of the words is a good way to solve Sandeepbalan's problem for most of the words, but you have to keep in mind that there are always a few that would be exceptions to rules and thus behave differently.

June 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dEKU-17

Hi there! Thank you for the offer! I'm still in the beginning phases of learning Japanese and I love it. I've been studying since January this year. I'm confused about tonari and yoco. Can they be used interchangeably? Also, which of these is the more natural way of saying "My older sister is outside"? Soto ni ane ga imasu or Ane ga soto ni imasu? Duo says they're both right but I'm looking for the most common way of saying it. Thank you! :)

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Hello:)

You can use them interchangeably. There might be certain phrases that only tonari/yoko can be used, but nothing comes up in my mind at the moment. I can say they mean the same. If some examples come up, I'll let you know.

soto ni ane ga imasu and ane ga soto ni imasu both sound so natural. But sometimes one is better over the other.

For example, if someone asks you "who is outside?", you would say ane ga imasu because you can put emphasis on "ane ga" in this way. I don't have any good examples of where you are supposed to say soto ni ane ga imasu:/ Also will let you know if I find a good example.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imi_imp

maybe if someone says 家の中に姉がいます and you could say, no, no, 外に姉がいます

it's a hard sentence to find context for! all the examples i can think of that put emphasis on "outside" would be for clarifying location... meh at least i'll know the emphasis if i ever had to read it

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dEKU-17

Thank you so much! you're the best!

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Herbstlaubfeld

どうも。

ヘッセン州から、よろしくと伝えたい。(Is that correct, or at least understandable?)

And how do I say "The most beautiful" ? Is it "最美"?

ありがとう舞子さん。 (Is that your name?)

I'm out.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thanks for the comment.

Yep, I totally understand what you say. A little bit revision makes the sentence sound even more natural, so here is my suggestion.

ヘッセン州 から こんにちは。 (Hello from Hessen.) こんにちは doesn't necessarily mean よろしく, but it sounds more chill and casual:P

The most beautiful = もっとも 美しい もっとも means the most. 最 also means the most like 最善(the best, 善 means good.) but 最 can only come before the certain kanjis. The examples including 最 are 最高, 最低, 最良 etc.

And yes, that's my name. I'm impressed that you know how to write my name in kanji!

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Herbstlaubfeld

1) ヘッセン州 から こんにちは。 Checked✔

2)美しい もっとも (I believe, the order doesn't matter here; which means I could write: "最も美しい" as well?)

3) Well, as far as I know, most (or a lot) Japanese female first names end with "子", so I got it through that ;)

Plenty of questions pop up in my mind while studying Japanese, but they never want to show up in a situation like this, when I have the opportunity to ask a native speaker. What a misery...

Thank you very much for your help :)

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

About 2, you can't say 美しい もっとも. Word order isn't that important and many words are switchable in Japanese, but in this case, もっとも always have to be before 美しい(adjective).

If you remember other questions afterwards, please come back here and ask me anytime:)

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Herbstlaubfeld

Now I'm confused... You wrote '美しい もっとも' yourself, or am I mistaken?

I conceived it (in my beginner level) as kinda wrong, but I thought when you're just saying those two words (without the whole sentence) the order doesn't matter. (In a sentence it's of course different.)

例えば、 「ここで、最も美しい考えを思いました。」*no clue if that's right. 'きれい' would be possibly better, wouldn't it?

Sorry (for it got so long)

And sorry, if something in between my words seems rude.(that's not my intention)

先生 ( ̄^ ̄)ゞ

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin438716

Alfheim-

I think you are referring to when she wrote this:

“The most beautiful = もっとも 美しい もっとも means the most.”

I think that was just unfortunate spacing. She likely meant:

“The most beautiful = もっとも美しい。もっとも means the most.”

You can use もっとも with other adjectives as well to mean the most.

もっとも重要 = most important もっとも強い = most strong

It always comes before the adjective it modifies when used this way.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Herbstlaubfeld

Yes, I guess it could only be that.

Thank you for your help :)

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLord2k1

idk why i'm learning japanese but its ok :) if you wanted any help with arabic i can help :) i know you dont learn it but eshta :)

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thank you for your offer. Arabic is one of the languages I've been wanting to learn for so long!

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyWhitfield

What made you want to learn French?

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

I have a friend from Netherlands. We don't have any problems in communicating in English, but I thought it would be fun if I could speak his language:)

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

And the same applies to French.

I'm studying French here, but I'm actually studying Dutch on Memrise, which is another app for language learning.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyWhitfield

I just started thinking how would you say dank memes in Japanese?

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Well, you could say ダンク ミーム(dank meme written in katakana), but I'm not sure people can tell what it means because the term? "dank meme" is not that popular among Japanese people.

コラ画像 is Japanese version of dank memes maybe. Google it if you're interested!

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeAllenSt

First of all, I don't believe you are a native Japanese speaker. Your English usage is perfect in my opinion.

I have studied Japanese for almost 3 years now. I am self taught but not fluent yet. What is the biggest mistake that English speakers make? Or even more than one mistake. What English speaker habits annoy Japanese people? ;)

For me too much aizuchi is a bit annoying. With aizuchi, Japanese people use interjections to show the speaker that they are listening to them. However if used too much, I feel like they are interruptions and interfere with my thinking and speaking.

In English we use words like "uh huh", "right", "no way" etc etc. I suppose English speakers could do the same thing and use them too much. I feel like in English, I use interjections mostly when there is a pause or if something is said that really warrants a response.

Sorry for the long post but you asked ;)

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

What a compliment:)

I don’t have a lot of English speaker friends who are learning Japanese, so it is not based on my own experiences or anything, but the usage of postpositional particles seems to be one of the biggest difficulties for learners. Although postpositional particles are often one-two letter(s), that one/two letter(s) has/have a HUGE impact towards sentences. For Japanese in return, we are not used to put words in certain order like you do in English, it is difficult to understand different word order could have different meanings.

Regarding aizuchi, I understand what you mean. This aizuchi thing is maybe part of Japanese culture. Aizuchi interrupts your speaking/thinking, that is so true, on the other hand, for some Japanese, it could be somehow a little bit uncomfortable that a person in front of you stay silent and make no aizuchi.

FYI This language program is designed by one of the best university in Japan. I share a link to the website just in case. http://www.coelang.tufs.ac.jp/mt/ja/gmod/

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Amai

='') Thanks !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

My pleasure:)

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emilyrebec250560

Hi Maiko--Thanks for your offer!
I was wondering what is an appropriate thing to say if I am serving someone food--something along the lines of "Bon appetit" or "Enjoy."

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin438716

Hi Emily, I'm not Maiko, but in my experience they usually just say どうぞ (douzo) or どうぞ食べてください (どうぞたべてください/Douzo tabete kudasai). This is simply "Please go ahead and eat", but it is what is said when english speakers might say "Bon appetit" or "enjoy"

Often the host will say this after someone says "いただきます", but they may say it first. When they say it first, it may be 先にどうぞ (さきにどうぞ/saki ni douzo )to mean please go ahead and start eating before they do.

If you are hosting and you want to raise the level you can say something like どうぞお召し上がりください douzo omeshiagari kudasai. This is a very polite form, but it is not too uncommon to use a more polite phrase in this particular context.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thanks for the question Emily, and thanks for the answer Justin. I think Justin's explanation is perfect:)

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin438716

☺️

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emilyrebec250560

Thank you so much for the thorough answer!!!

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas_Wesley

Greetings!

Would you happen to know what しってる means? It came up in my pokémon game and I can't find it anywhere online or in my dictionary...

ありがとうございます!

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin438716

知ってる is short for 知っている = to know, like to know someone or know of something. The Dictionary form is 知る. It is not used for to know as in to understand which is usually 分かる (わかる)

I'm not sure where you are at in your Japanese study, but the ~っている construction is used like a progressive form (like -ing) in English: 本を読んでいる = reading a book.

But with some verbs, the ~っている form indicates a state. This is so with 知る, so 知っている means the state of knowledge, NOT the progressive. I know that confuses some learners so I thought I'd mention it. You may already know that.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas_Wesley

Thank you! I thought it had something to do with "knowing", but couldn't quite confirm it anywhere.

I may have seen っている before, but I will not claim to have any serious knowledge or mastery of it.

Thank you very much for the info!!!

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thank you for the question Thomas, and thank you for the answer Justin! Justin explains quite accurately.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nano-Robot

Bienvenido :3

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Hi there:)

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cynthia917460

Hajimemashite! Arigatou gozaimasu for your very kind offer! You are a blessing!

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Hajimemashite:D Glad many people have showed up here!

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus542296

I have a question regarding verb conjugation. I know you said you aren't the best at explaining grammar, but would you be able to explain the difference between ending verbs in ます vs. ending them in る or う? How do you know when to do that?

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thank you for the question.

Important thing to remember here is that ます is not the ending of verbs but a post positional particle. It’s an independent word used with verbs. You put ます after verbs when you want to be more polite.

Here are two sentences which mean “I drink water.”

1) わたし は みず を のむ (flat tone) 2) わたし は みず を のみ ます (polite)

As explained above, のみます is not one word. It can be divided into two parts, のみ and ます. When you put ます after のむ(verb), のむbecomes のみ. That’s the verb conjugation, like drink becomes drank in the past tense in English (I know it’s not the same at all, but I hope you could get an idea somehow.). You can’t say わたし は みず を のむ ます.

And, there are no verbs ending with ます. Verbs always (Though I can’t guarantee there are no exceptions, let’s say 99% of verbs) end with the sound of “u” as you pointed out, such as はしる(hashiru) のむ(nomu) たべる(taberu) and はなす(hanasu).

I think it is easier for you to remember のみます as a phrase because conjugating verbs is sort of difficult.

I’m not sure it makes sense… If you have additional questions or it doesn’t make sense to you, please let me know.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus542296

That's actually clarifies that perfectly. Just a follow up question though. How do you know what sound a verb is going to end in? For example, 食べ ends in る which seems kind of additive since there's no る in 食べます, but 話せます is a polite equivalent of 話す in which case it just seems like せ is changing to す.

I guess, in summation, how do you know if you're just changing a character to make the (u) sound verses adding an (u) to the word if that makes any sense.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

This is the toughest question to answer so far.

Technically speaking, each verb conjugates in accordance with certain grammatical rules. We memorized all these conjugation chart thing for exams when we are students.

But in my opinion, remembering all these chars take too much effort.

Here is an example of 読む

読ま ない (not read) 読み ます (read in a polite way) 読む (read) 読む こと (reading) 読め ば (If~read) 読め (read!(order))

読む changes when it associates with certain words. The last letter of the word changes to ま, み, む, め in this case.

I know this example is confusing so you should’t be freaked out about it. What I want to say here is that remembering all these conjugates themselves are really way too much. And even if you know 読む can be 読ま, there is no point to know it if you could not associate 読ま with ない. Conjugated verbs don’t make sense without associated words which are supposed to come together with conjugated verbs in certain forms.

You can just remember “読みます” or “読まない” every time you bump into new phrases. I think it is much easier!

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus542296

Ah, okay. I get it. It's kind of like the negation of adjectives where you can't just say 高いない. It has to be conjugated to 高くない. There are conjugate associations that have to be incorporated in order for the conjugates to have any meaning.

I'll have to learn them at some point, but I guess I'll just get this vocab down before that.

Thanks.

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karmagith

話せます is acually the polite form of 話せる and 話します is the polite form of 話す

話す - to speak

話せる - to be able to speak (potential form)

for non irregular verbs, when going from the dictionary form (without the ます) to the polite ます form, if it ends in eru or iru (like 食べる - taberu) the る is dropped and ます is added, for all other non irregular verbs, including verbs ending in aru oru and uru, the last u becomes i and ます is added. (す becomes し because that is the equivalent letter in that row, same with つ and ち)

of course there are irregular verbs that break those rules, but that is how the ます form is derived for most verbs. Learning the dictionary forms is helpful as that is the form that everything else is derived from.

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrybabyOtaku

Thank you so much for wanting to help us!

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

I thank YOU for giving me opportunities to review Japanese grammar again:)

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juggledean

はじめまして、どうぞよろしく。Thank you for starting this thread. If I can help with American English, please ask.

I have a Japanese question. In English there are two different meanings of the word “why” - “for what purpose” OR “by what means”. How can these be distinguished in Japanese? 何故、何で? What did Amaterasu say to Susanoo 日本語で?

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

はじめまして!

Thank you very much for your offer! I'm still learning English so I'll be happy if you could correct me if I'm wrong or there would be a better/more natural way to say certain things!

When you want to say "why (for what purpose)", you would say 何故(naze) or なんで(we usually don't use kanji (何で)). I'm not sure grammatical explanation helps you, but なんで is adverb.

And if you want to say "why (by what means)", 何で(nani de) is what you're going to say. This is distinguished from なんで(adverb). 何で is not one word, it consists of 何(nani) and で(de).

About last question, I don't know what it is. If you give me any clues, I could google it in Japanese.

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juggledean

どうも!

Your written English is very good. The only thing I have noticed is sometimes you leave out an article like "a" or "the". But so do many native English speakers on the internet.

From what you wrote about the last question, I think she said 何故. You can google "for what purpose" Amaterasu. I found it in an English wikipedia article but I couldn't find it in the Japanese version. I'm a little surprised you don't know what it is, The English wiki says Amaterasu is "the most well-known deity of Japanese mythology". I guess they should say "of ancient Japanese mythology".

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

こんにちは:)

Thank you for the comment. Yes, a and the is what I'm still struggling. I really don't know which one I should choose so sometimes I randomly put either one lol.

Of course, I know Amaterasu, but I'm not sure what you are referring to. Sorry :O

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juggledean

'a' and 'an' (before a vowel sound) are indefinite articles. they can also mean 'one'. 'a' is not used before a plural noun. 'the' is a definite article, referring to something in particular which is known by context.

They are a nuisance and we can communicate without them. I often notice they are lacking in scientific papers written in English by Asian authors. They do act as a shibboleth to help identify native speakers.

At least 'a' and 'the' don't have genders. I still have trouble in Dutch and Spanish. Mostly I'm trying to learn what sounds right.

June 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thelector

It's great! Very thanks for your contribution! I am very intersting in Eastern languages and cultures!!!

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Hope you'll like Japanese culture and language even more:D

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s5H53

Thank you for reaching out!!! ^_^v

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

:)))

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyyyanS

xxMaikoさん、はじめまして!自分はアメリカで生まれ育ちましたが親は日本からの日本人なのである程度は話せます。自分も一応ネイティブ(かな?)だと思うので、挨拶しようと思いました!

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Ryyyanさん、はじめまして! 日本人の親御さんがいらしてアメリカ育ちとは、本物のバイリンガルですね、うらやましい~。

日本語をこんなに熱心に勉強している方がたくさんいらして、嬉しいですね:)))

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimimi

始めまして&ようこそ(私も本当に来たばかりですが・・・^^)。こっちは日本語ネイティブではないし、正直言って分からない単語や文法がまだまだ多いけど、結構長く勉強しているし、日本語が様々な理由で今まで勉強してきた言語の中で一番大切で一番好きな言語だから、私も同じ日本好きを少しでもサポートしたくてここに来たのです。^^

日本に住んでいた頃、日本人の友達によく英語の文法について聞かれて、正しい答えが分かっていてもどうして正しいかはうまく説明できなかったのも驚くほど多かったです。だから舞子さんが言った母語を教えることの難しさがよく分かります。^^’’ でもネイティブだからこそ力になれる場合も多いと思うし、ネイティブにしか分からないこともたくさんあると思うので、きっと舞子さんのような日本語ネイティブの方がいるとみんな助かると思います。:)

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

はじめまして、Mimimiさん! コメントありがとうございます。

私が今まで考えたことがなかったようなご質問をたくさんいただいて、私自身も日本語を改めて勉強する良い機会になっています。 母国語を教えるのはすごく難しいですね。

そしてMimimiさんの日本語に感動です。 外国語でも勉強によってこんなハイレベルに到達できるという素晴らしい証明です:D♪

少しでも日本語を勉強する皆さんのお役に立てると嬉しいですね!

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inwikz.

(This may be a silly question...) When you write intricate Kanji characters, do you have to make sure to include every detail? For example, 識別 (Shikibetsu) (identification). To an English speaker just starting Japanese, this would seem pretty hard to identify ;) . You would draw each stroke until you've finished the Kanji, right? Or is there a way to sort of simplify it (?) or write it simpler, somehow, so that it still has the same meaning and looks the same, (or something like that...)? If I was confusing please tell me ;-;

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thanks for the question and it's not silly at all.

We BASICALLY finish kanjis with every single detail. But in your daily life, you don't want to take too much time on write 識別 or tire your hand, so you sometimes write kanjis very roughly.

There are no rules or correct simplified versions of kanjis. It's just like you are too lazy to write them perfectly xD People roughly write alphabets in their daily life, right?

There are very few people who actually writes alphabets like those in the textbooks.

Same custom exists in Japanese language. Hope this answers your question! Of course you should write perfect kanjis in official documents or all those stuffs.

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingOfCarbs
  1. I've heard there's no specific rule for using on'yomi and kun'yomi, but do you have any tips on when I should use which reading?

  2. Any tips on memorizing complex kanji characters?

It means a lot that you want to help people learning your language! ありがとうございます!

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayamedori

I'm not Maiko, but I think I can answer this haha (feel free to correct me if I say something wrong).

  1. I'm not sure if there are any 'official' rules, but there are guidelines. When a kanji forms a word by itself, you use kunyomi, but when it forms a word with another kanji, you use onyomi; for example, 水 on its own is pronounced mizu, but in 水中 ('underwater') it's pronounced sui. Obviously there are some exceptions, like names, which (almost) always use kunyomi: 田中さん -> 'tanaka-san', not 'denchuu-san'. Most of the time you can stick to the guideline I explained though, and if you're not sure you can always look it up in/copy-paste it to a dictionary like jisho.org.

  2. Loooots of practice, writing them over and over and over again, and paying attention to the radicals works.

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KraequhoS

Indeed, I don't think only reading/looking is enough. To master the Kanjis, you have to write them all over again and again. Even if you know them very well, keep on printing them into your mind or some details with become rusty with time :)

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingOfCarbs

This is extremely helpful! Thank you ayamedori and Kraequho. ありがとう!

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jazon992972

te felicito.

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YonemuriSh

Wish you a nice day. :3 Just a small question, there's one thing I don't understand...when do we use "Desu" and when do we use "Masu"? And what does the "arimasu" mean?

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

There might be exceptions (sorry I'm not professional!), です comes after verbs, adjectives and nominal adjectives. ます comes after others.

Arimasu means "There is a..." Arimasu consists of ありand ます. あり is conjugated ある.

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KraequhoS

Hi man,

I see you are learning French, I'm a native French speaker so If you need any help/question, don't hesitate to contact me :) I learned a bit of Japanese by myself and on Duolingo but I'm not that good ( I have a truly bad memory)... I work on several languages(4) at the same time (that sure not help), my method is simply to switch from one to another according to my travel schedule. I go in Greece in September so I'm focusing on greek at the moment and I plan to climb Fuji-San in next July (2019) with friends so I'll surely get back to Japanese right after my trip to Greece. I already went to Japan and it's an awesome place ! Where are you coming from exactly?

See ya.

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Hello, thank you for the comment and your kind offer;)

Switching languages you learn based on your travel schedule sounds quite amazing! I would like to adopt that method too!

Climbing Fuji-san sounds great:) I've never climbed Fuji-san lol. Hope you'll have a great experience in Japan!

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KraequhoS

I'm still practising and hearing a bit in the other languages in order to keep my current level. Sometimes it's quite hard, but I'm sticking to it :) My goal is to be fluent in Greek and Japanese, I have to work hard for that. My travels give me an extra-motivation. I think the motivation is important in language learning, everyone has to find his :)

June 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Totally agree! Motivation is always the key in learning languages:)

I am trying to learn a few languages in parallel, but it didn't work for me.

European languages including English share some words/concepts quite often, which leads me confused which language I am learning:/

June 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tenshiAlfa

are some words in Japanese feminine or masculine like in other languages such as french, and Spanish?

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

The answer is no.

But there are certain ways of saying something only men/women use.

For example, when you want to say "I see" in Japanese, women tend to say そうだよね and men tend to say そうだよな. Two of these sentences mean exactly the same, but the impressions that a listener gets are different.

Men can say そうだよね and vice versa, but it can sometimes sound a little bit weird.

There are so many stuffs like this in Japanese. Learning these things may help you to speak Japanese more naturally!

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jems1891

Bienvenue dans le monde de duolingo

Hope to get some advice some times and I will be pleased to help you too.

See u

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thank you:) (What is "le monde" by the way :D)

It would be great if we could help each other:D

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jems1891

The world

And I'm sure we will ;-)

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thanks. le monde = the world, remembered!

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raku-dono

This works but saying universe is better here : bienvenue dans l'univers de duolingo

April 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/littleshihtzu

why does the hiragana for ha have a wa sound when saying, watashi wa... ?

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

I didn't know WHY so I did a quick research on Google to find out there is a Japanese language transformation history. It is too complicated to explain here, so I should just leave it.

You know は in わたし は is pronounced wa, so that's great:D

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LordFloof

Do you have any tips on learning the language? I want to visit Japan but I definitely need to learn the language before I go xD

I'm a native english speaker and really slow at learning new languages. But I'm really trying to stick to this

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Hmm... I'm not that good at learning new languages either. But at least I can say it takes some time. Even if you feel like you gain nothing, your language level is certainly going up!

Let's learn new languages together here:)))

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crispymeme

Are there any foreign video games popular in japan, for example Call of Duty, Halo, or Overwatch?

Also you are a very cool person!

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

I'm not playing games that much, so I really don't know what kind of games are popular here. Sorry xD

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanArmando96

Hello greetings from Mexico. My native language is Spanish, and my English is not perfect, so I apologize if my grammar is bad, hehe.

I have a big question about your language, Japanese. It's information that I do not find much on the internet.

In Japan, do "regionalisms" exist? That is, local words that are only used in a certain prefecture or city. For example, in the Spanish language, there are many ways to say "child" (which in Spanish is called "niño"). However, in each country there is a "local" (regionalism) or synonym way to say "niño".

For example, in Mexico, we tell the children: "chamacos", in Argentina is "pibes", in Colombia is "pelados", the point is that in every Spanish-speaking country there is a local word to refer to children that you will not find in a dictionary.

Now my question is: In Aomori there are words or expressions that the people of Nagasiki do not use? Or are there words that the people of Osaka use in their daily lives that the people of Chiba can not understand?

So, do "regionalisms" exist in the Japanese language?

Greetings from México!

June 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OKAMOTO_Yusuke

¡Hola! Mucho gusto.

Spanish is a language spoken across many countries. Thus there would be many "standard languages" (e.g. https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voseo). In contrast to Spanish, Japanese is virtuality spoken only in Japan (as a mother tongue). There would be the sole standard Japanese, thus I suppose there is no "regionalism" in the sense of the standard language.

On the other hand almost all languages have dialects. Japanese is not an exception, there are many dialects from region to region in Japan. Some of them can be mutually understood across regions, while some cannot.

Let me present some examples, which often lead to misunderstanding:

ほうる (放る) it means "throw" and "let it be" in the standard Japanese, while it means "dispose, discard" in some dialects (mainly in western Japan). 「ほうっておいて」 means "Let it be, as it is" in the standard Japanese, but "Discard it" in some dialects.

なおす (直す) it means "fix, repair" in the standard Japanese, while "stow (in a proper place)" in some dialects. When one says なおしておいて in dialects to ask stowage, he/she may reply "nothing is wrong with this item, no need to repair".

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steve817862

People in Kyoto say "おおきに" instead of "ありがとう". In Okinawa, they speak a different language. There is a lot of variety in Japan, much more than people will have you believe.

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanArmando96

Hi, I have another question. It's information that I find almost nothing on the internet.

In the Japanese language do the "accents" exist? That is to say, in Chiba do they speak in a tone of voice different from that of Osaka? Or do Shimane speak in a way that Saitama do not speak?

What are all the types of "accents" that exist in Japan?

Greetings from Mexico!

June 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OKAMOTO_Yusuke

Japanese is a pitch-accent language, in other words "high and low" accent. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_pitch_accent for details. The system is completely different from most European languages (stress accent).

As you speculated, there is a certain and distinct difference in the accent from region to region. The two major accent types are Kyoto (Keihan) accent and Tokyo accent (see the above Wikipedia). These two types are completely different, but mutually comprehensible enough even without any prior knowledge.

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steve817862

There are lots of accents in Japan. Generally, they are associated with a place, so you just add べん to a place name to name the accent. 沖縄ベン、京都ベン、青森ベン、etc. It is not like English accents. In English, an accent is usually marked by using alternate vowels. In Japanese, people often use different words or endings. Sometimes there is a different pronunciation, like saying しと instead of ひと, but it's not usually a change in the vowel, but the consonant. Mostly it is subtle, like accents in the US. As you travel there are small shifts in language choices.

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Learning-doge

Hey! Thank you for taking the time to create a thread like this. I'm just starting learning japanese and I noticed you were doing a french course. As a native french speaker it piqued my curiosity.

For what reason would you try to learn french? Also feel free to ask any questions you might have, maybe we can help each others out in our goal to learn a new language.

Cheers!

June 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thank you for the comment:)

I decided to start learning French because a) I want to be a multilingual, b) I have a few friends from French, c) there are some French musicians that I love and last not least d) I'd love to visit France someday!

Learning French is such a tough journey:)

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hsinhsing

nice!

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Thanks!

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe598286

Hello, and thanks for the helping offer, could you be so kind to explain the difference between せand し in certain verbs please? for example はなします and はなせますthank you in advance, by the way I speak french as I grew up speaking it as a second language and went to a french school (english is my 3rd language), so I think i could be considered as a native french speaker, and I noticed you are learning french, so if you need any help with anything just ask me :).

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

はなします and はなせます have different meanings to them. はなします means "speak" , on the other hand, はなせます means "CAN speak".

Here are some other examples. はしります vs はしれます (run vs can run) (plane: はしる) ねむります vs ねむれます (sleep vs can sleep) (plane: ねむる) かきます vs かけます (write vs can write) (plane: かく)

If you know the plane form of verbs, you can tell the conjugated verbs have the meaning of this "can" meaning or not. The last letter of plane form of verbs (which is basically "u" sound) change into "e" sound, which basically contains "can" meaning. If it changes into "i" sound, it is just a simple assertive sentence in a polite way.

If I confuse you, I'm sorry about it. Don't hesitate to ask any follow-up Qs!

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe598286

Oh, this was not confusing, I thought it was well explained and its very similar to french in a funny way (3 verbal groups in french so i think these are the planes you speak of) Thank you very much for your answer it was very helpful! By the way,I have another question I has hoping to ask you. When im typing in japanese I have 3 online japanese keyboards at the same time and type between the 3 of them, but for the kanji keyboard I search for the phonetic of the kanji, and then have to search and select the one im looking for from a huge list,like you can imagine it takes a bit of time so my question is. how do japanese people manage to quickly introduce kanji in quick message text or so?

June 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

I can't see what kind of keyboards you are using, so here is my general suggestion.

I'm using Google Japanese when I'm typing Japanese. I reccomend you to use this keyboard because it is simple and user-friendly.

Native Japanese don't take that much time to find the kanji because we are sure what we are looking for. For Japanese learners, when it comes to typing Japanese, you shouldn't worry too much about finding kanji because those used in daily life comes on around first to third lines( I hope you can tell what I mean by 'lines'.) If you scroll A LOT to find the one you want to use, you may write it in hiragana because a) the kanjis appeared later in the page are rarely used in daily life or b) those are maybe too difficult even for native Japanese to read or write.

I believe that you can go with kanjis on the upper in the page;)

And writing hiragana is nothing to concern. If you are not sure which kanji you should use, then go write it in hiragana! It's totally fine;)

Follow up Qs are always welcome!

June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe598286

Thank you, this has been very helpful ☺♥♫

June 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AncientAxe

Hi, is ペンを書く correct in as to say write pen (same as ペンで書く)? What is more natural?

Thanks!

June 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxMaiko

Hello:)

ペンで書く is the correct one, and ペンを書く doesn't work if you want to say "write with a pen".

Each postpositional particle has not one but various meanings according to the context, therefore I cannot say this means this. So I’d appreciate if you could get what I’m going to say below is just a general/basic idea to answer your question :D

私はペンで日記を書く (I keep a journal with a pen.) (This is “so what?” example, my bad! I can’t come up with anything meaningful lol.) Take a look at this sentence as an example.

で indicates a tool, so it is used for identifying what with you do something. In this example, で indicates a pen. What with do you keep a journal? With a pen. →で

And を indicates the subject of the action. What do you read? A book. →を

It can be helpful if an object in a sentence can be the answer to the question “What with do you ~?”, you should put で before that noun, which is usually a tool. And if an object in a sentence can be the answer to the question “What do you~?”, you should put を before that noun.

This could be off the topic, so you may skip this part but I’d add a bit more info. で is also used for identifying the place where the action is taken place quite often. For example, 私は友達の家でねる (I sleep at my friend’s house.) In this example, で indicates the place, which is “my friend’s house”. Where do you sleep? At my friend’s house. →で When you can answer to “Where do you~?” with a noun in the sentence, で should be put before that noun.

I’m glad if it helped you in some way! Please feel free to ask me follow up questions if you have any.

June 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AncientAxe

ありがとうございます

June 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blake7269

Great to see help from a native speaker!

July 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matalya1

Something I've really wanted to know from a native speaker is: what would you recommend for a person that wants to "escape" to the country? (Not, like, ilegally or literally escaping xD More like going to live there instead of their current country). How much proficency is expected or necessary? Is there a warning I should be aware of that makes the country sizably harder to live in? I understand the price of life in there is sizable and it's a rather asocial place, at least compared to my motherland Argentina.

August 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hayatbiralem

Thank you for your kind offer. I just start learning Japanese and I hope your offer still exists.

I am a huge fan of anime series and I'm thinking that I already know some words, yay :D

I really appreciate your help in advance.

Thanks.

August 26, 2019
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