"¿Un jugo de naranja?"

Translation:An orange juice?

5 months ago

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel303668

juice is a non-count noun. 'A' should only be there if you have a utensil with it. -Un vaso de jugo de naranja.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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While that is technically correct, a waitress will repeat back your order of "an orange juice" in just this way to verify that she has it right. By the way, "a glass" is not commonly considered a utensil, such as forks, knives and spoons. That is however, again, technically correct to include vessels as utensils, but this dates back to a time when cups and bowls were all we had to use.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth185847

While a glass is not considered a utensil "a orange juice" is still not the correct grammar. : )

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Correct. It should be “an orange juice” which is what is above. Yes, it is more common to say “a glass of orange juice”.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drake-stix

whats your native langauge?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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English. I am from California.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyraHarvin

Gracias soooooo mucho

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owen219726

Zumo in spain, Jugo they don't use

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djr24
djr24
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When talking about a glass of juice meant for drinking, Spaniards use "zumo," not "jugo."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gchristie1

"An orange juice?" is used in a stand alone situation in at least two situations.

One, to confirm a request. "I'd like an orange juice, please?" "An orange juice?"

Two, to express surprise. I think I'll have an orange juice." "An orange juice?!"

Note, the "An" in all four cases is optional and can be used or not as you wish. This can be very regional--I grew up in mid-Atlantic USA (Delaware) where we have coffee. I now live in New England (Rhode Island) where we have A coffee.

Point is duoLingo pretends there is one English and one Spanish and that there is a pretty easy way to translate one to the other. All three assumptions are necessary but flawed.

If you learn the duoLingo correct answers, you will be fine. When you go to a specific place you will learn regional differences, just as you do in your native language when you travel or move.

Finally, if I was getting drinks for a group of people and a foreigner said "please, a cup milk," I wouldn't yell at her, "You idiot! In the English of my region we say, 'A glass of milk, please!'" Nope, I'd get her milk and wish I could speak her language so well.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel303668

The word 'some' can be used with count or non- count nouns.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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When "some" refers to a non-count noun for an unspecified quantity, it is not translated into Spanish. "I drink some orange juice." or "I drink orange juice." both translate to "Tomo jugo de naranja." or "Bebo jugo de naranja."

If by "some", "a little" is meant than that would be "un poco de". If by "some", "a number of" is meant than that would be "unos". If by "some", "certain" is meant than that would be "cierto". If you could say "some or another", than that would be "algún". https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/some

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amina_sub
Amina_sub
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I still don't know how to pronounce Jugo correctly.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.Tracy
Evan.Tracy
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Who-goh.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambisqueiro

Keep calm! I still do not know how to pronounce and distinguish : Juice,just,Does, Jews... -Practice makes... Try to pronounce; Zumo( jugo)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stef992

do you want an orange juice? Why isnt correct?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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There is no verb. This is just “An orange juice?”

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stef992

Yes but its question, and Duo on other examples accepts thees kind of answers, cause correct me if i am wrong but you will rarely hear in english just "An orange juice?" as a question...and in spanish that is a normal thig

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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No, it is not more normal in Spanish than in English.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stef992

OK what ever but still either way "Do you want an orange juice?" should be correct like on other examples... Thanks anyway

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“An orange juice?” (Is that what you said?) may not be an offer. The next words can be: “I’m sorry, we only offer that with breakfast and we have none left.”

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zina77997

Exactly. That's what I put and it was marked wrong. But the phrase is in question form.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Don’t add verbs to phrases if you want to get the answer correct in Duolingo.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrenPerk2

Seems to me if its a question and that question is 'an orange juice?' What it should translate to is 'do you want an orange juice?' As the most likely meaning. I know im wrong but that makes sense to me. Its not a question if a waitress is reading back your order. They are declaring the order and you must correct if it is in error.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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If the waitress is not sure that she has the order right, then it can also be a question. There is a difference between (Okay, I have you down for) “an orange juice.” and “An orange juice?” (Do I have that right?”)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambisqueiro

why does not appears the do or does if this is a question? Can I put does in this sentence? Does an orange juice? ¿ Un zumo de naranja? Is it optional? Right?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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This is not a full sentence and so there is no verb. Probably someone placed an order and the waiter or waitress is repeating it back for verification that he or she has the order right. So, the full sentence could be "Do you want an orange juice?" or "You want an orange juice, don't you?" or "Is your order for an orange juice?" or " "An orange juice", do I have that right?"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambisqueiro

Thank you so much.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GavitchLee

I learned from a different app that orange juice is ‘zumo de naranja’. What’s the difference? Which is used more commonly?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brandork135

Would you not be able to say naranja jugo?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrenPerk2

I dont know for sure but it would probably sound like it would sound to english speakers if someone said "can i have a juice of the orange". You would probably understand but it wouldn't be exactly right.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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No, that construction does not even exist in Spanish. At least the “juice of the orange” exists in English though it would seem strange to us.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoBJ

How do you know whether the question is "Is it an orange juice, or do you want an orange juice"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Exactly, you cannot know from the phrase if it means either of those.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick_Toms

I typed "orange juice" and got it wrong because it wanted "one orange juice" so when I get the same question and type "one orange juice", it says that the preferred answer is "an orange juice".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Both “an orange juice” and “one orange juice” are correct.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALRIGHTOKAYOKAY

Some kind of orange... juice? Nope, never heard of it.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Where did you get “some kind of” from? It is “an orange juice?” or “One orange juice?” My answer, “No, I need three of them! I don’t care if it comes in a glass or a pitcher, just get me three of them!”

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_McG
Paul_McG
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Why not 'zumo'?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Also correct, “zumo” is the word used in Spain while jugo is for the juice of meat there, but in Latin America “jugo” is the word for juice.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marisa474096

An Orange Juice?, is not a queston

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Sure it is; it basically means “Did I understand you correctly?” or “Is that what you said?”

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sabine959064

Report: a glass of orange juice should be accepted

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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We don’t know if it is a glass or a pitcher of orange juice. It is probably an order of orange juice. It could come in a plastic cup. “A glass of orange juice” = “Un vaso de jugo de naranja”

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brunoperrone

It's strange! I thought it was "zumo de naranja". It's the first time I see Jugo de Naranja. Do you know if it's a formal / informal way? What's the difference of "Zumo" and "Jugo"?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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It is “zumo” in Spain. In Latin America you will find “jugo” used, though in Spain “jugo” is used for the liquid that comes off meat. https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/Juice

https://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/Jugo

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveLewis50

Why is ¿Un zumo de naranja? unaccepted?

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arctinus
Arctinus
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You should (keep) report(ing) it, so it will be accepted. :)

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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They are teaching Latin American Spanish, so the word used in Spain was not originally included, but they usually add words from Spain when reported.

Try including a dictionary link with your report: https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/Juice

If you had the exercise in which you listen to Spanish and write what you hear, then you would have to write the version that they said though.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michele19353

Why not a glass of orange juice?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.Tracy
Evan.Tracy
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Because "un vaso" does not appear in this sentence. While they both essentially mean the same thing, it is technically not correct.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel303668

That's what mine is in Spanish 'Un vaso de jugo de naranja' but won't change it yet.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambisqueiro

There is not " a glass" ( un vaso) In this sentence.

Un zumo( jugo) de naranja, un vaso de zumo de naranja, un litro de zumo de naranja, una jarra de zumo de naranja...

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arctinus
Arctinus
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Because it says 'un jugo de naranja', not 'un vaso de jugo de naranja'. :P

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aanonymous4

I put "A cup of a orange juice" could they count too

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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No, you don’t usually count orange juice so you don’t usually put an indefinite article there, but you can count “a cup”. I understand why you wanted to put “a cup”, but how do you know that it is not “a glass” which is even more common? If you do put an indefinite article in front of orange juice, it cannot be “a” because orange starts with a vowel so it would have to be “an”. This can happen in a restaurant. A waitress may take you order and repeat back “An orange juice?” She means “one order of orange juice”.

4 months ago
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