"Una tienda de ropa."

Translation:A clothes store.

4 months ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jml646982
jml646982
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Don't we need to say clothing store?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amberbelle11

"A clothing store" is accepted as of 6/12/18

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NancyKnecht

it didn't accept it today :-(

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2Wz1xJR2
2Wz1xJR2
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it accepted it today 9/13/18

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiceyokooko
spiceyokooko
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No.

The literal translation is:

A store of clothes.

So, 'A clothes store' is what they're looking for.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/szilarduk
szilarduk
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I never heard a fashion store referred to as 'a clothes store'...

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

spiceyokooko Mmmm, maybe or maybe no..

It is, sort of, or somewhat of, a "literal" translation.

However, better to say that it IS the way that Spanish turns a noun into an adjective. "Ropa" is a noun in Spanish. But "clothing" is an adjective in this sentence.

Probably it is best to say it is "literally" a "clothes" or "clothing store." Or perhaps sometimes, it is best to stay away from talk of a "literal" translation.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leisheng
leisheng
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"A clothes store" is not how we say it in English. It should be "A clothing store". Then again, we are learning Spanish, so...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eve_Amor

Most people say A/The clothes store in English

19 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sparedOstrich

I did try 'A shop of clothes', it was marked wrong

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingomohini

Me too

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emon220268

We definitely don't say "clothes store" in English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eve_Amor

Many people do

19 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Secondof11

ENGLISH = A clothing store.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glenn748976

Yeah, a little grace here, no?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeilRogall

That's what i said and it told me i was wrong.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zar4er
zar4er
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"A store for clothes" should be accepted here.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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zar4eer: It's worth a try, but your sentence sounds unnatural, like the shop/store would be a place for storing clothes.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betsys2003
betsys2003
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And "A clothes store" does not sound weird?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JordanLebl1

Where I live we say "a store of clothes" pretty often..

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quixylados

In norwegian we say clothes store. Maybe not if you translate it to english but other languages it works just fine.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betsys2003
betsys2003
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Of course there are languages in which "clothes store" works. English is not one of them, so they should not be teaching it as correct.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolynClarke1

why was my response of a dress shop wrong - this is what we say in the UK. My given translation of a garments shop is very old fashioned

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betsys2003
betsys2003
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Would you say "A dress shop" if you were going to a large department store, or a boutique that primarily sold men's clothes? I would think "a dress shop" would be more specific than they mean here.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindafraser
lindafraser
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I agree, Carolyn, that a dress shop Is a place where one goes to buy clothing - at least that is how it is referred to in my neck of the woods (Canada) - the same as in the UK. This would seem to be one of those translations that varies, depending on one’s location. I have never heard of anyone going to a “clothes store” but perhaps there are places where that is the case.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lola440119

I used the word shop instead of store and was also marked wrong

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraceMeini

It accepted a clothings shop

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BichaelMurns

Why isn't "A shop of clothes." accepted?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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Because the literal translation sounds unnatural. A clothing shop/store or A clothes store/shop is what most English speakers would say.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Perhaps in England. I don't recall hearing of a "clothes/clothing shop" here in the U.S.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhian167358

It said I was wrong, but I did ir correctly ???

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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Perhaps your answer may have had a typo, like in your post ('ir' rather than 'it').

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PegWhitman
PegWhitman
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I wrote Una tienda ropa thinking a clothing store. Is the de necessary?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dani_M_

Yes, cause in Spanish you say a store of clothes. So just like you can't drop the "of" you can't also drop the "de".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nishaanx

Hi Dani_M_ Why can you say an item without the "de" Eg "Una camisa verde" And not: Una camisa de verde ?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betsys2003
betsys2003
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Verde is an adjective, it's modifying the noun. Ropa in the original case is a noun, so it can't be used to "modify" the noun tienda.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betsys2003
betsys2003
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Why are there no longer as many options for reporting? This is not a good English sentence, and I wanted to report it, but I can't.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZannaHeighton

This is meant to be English language, not American language. At least you should accept 'shop', i.e., English, as well as the American store. In English a store means a storage place, not a shop.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Actually, DL is teaching American (U.S.) English. Sorry.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindafraser
lindafraser
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Agreed. Shop is very common usage in Canada as well.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teresa764365

I said a clothing store and it was right ive said that everytime i get this particular phrase

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrBaye35

I said "A store for clothes" with given words. It wasn't accepted. Then, the answer appeared: "A clothes store". Is this a joke??

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrayNathan

I listened to it thrice, and I thought I heard "Una tienda la ropa."

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheilaSwan

No no says a garment shop!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandra336171

I wrote "one store of clothes". It was the literal translation and should have been okay since a clothing store is in fact a store of clothes.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

But in my experience, few people would call a clothing store a "store of clothes."

I have a store of clothes (clothes stored) in my clothes closet. But they aren't available for sale. I don't think many people refer to Target or Pennys as stores of clothes .

"Hi, Honey. I'm going the store of clothes to shop" sounds very strange. ("Suena muy raro.")

I typed "store of clothes" into Google, and it gave me mostly "clothing stores."

Remember that the "literal" translation may not be the best, or even a good, translation.

How would you translate: "me llamo..." (I call my self..").

Try these. These are all Spanish phrases that should not be translated literally. (I have given the appropriate translation.):

"a voz en grito" – loudly, at the top of one´s lungs.

"cuando las ranas críen pelos" - “When pigs learn to fly”.

"dormir como un lirón" -- "to sleep a lot; sleep like a dog."

"en cueros " -- "in the buff", naked.

"meterse en el sobre" – To hit the hay/go bed.

"ni soñarlo!" – In your dreams!/No way!

3 months ago
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