1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Spanish
  4. >
  5. "¿De dónde eres?"

"¿De dónde eres?"

Translation:Where are you from?

June 2, 2018

166 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HemanshuCh3

'from where are you?' OR 'where are you from?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

There are a lot of people posting that "Where are you from?" is bad grammar.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/grammar/ending-sentences-with-prepositions

As you can see, there's no reason to avoid ending with a preposition here. Both sentences should be accepted and there's no reason for name calling. I'm going to clean up the unnecessary and repetitive comments. Let's try to be civil, folks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsPuddles

Aww! You saved my link! I do so love posting that particular bit of information. Keep up the great work.. oh and congrats on making Mod, Dan. Well deserved, I am sure. You have far more patience than I do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

See this different reference that confirms that DL is correct. It addresses specifically questions ending with prepositions.

http://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/grammar/beginner-grammar/question-words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hermithewormy321

in Spanish, some sentences a put the opposite ways than others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roberto90682

I made the same mastake as you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gunmashi

Even i wrote the same is that acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlurffyDorks

Seriously where’s the grammar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

You have to ask a question if you want help with the grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YeimySierra

You can't use "from" from the beginning. In spanish you use "de", but in english you can't translate like This


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen908

You can, actually. It is becoming less popular to do so, but saying, "From where are you?" is just as valid as, "Where are you from?" Both are grammatically acceptable in English--at least for now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcuslawsk

I cannot speak to the official grammar, but as a native I can say 'From where are you?' sounds terrible and I've never heard anyone say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strugatsky

It may seem to accord with formal grammar rules but it is not idiomatic English. Native English speakers never say "from where are you" because "where are you from" is the universally accepted idiomatic word order for that phrase. Otherwise the preposition "from" is crying out for an object: "From where are you... what?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobbJones2

Why is "Where are you?" wrong, when it says eres can mean "are you"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy65brown

¿De dónde eres? Where are you from? (origin = ser/eres).
¿Dónde estás? Where are you? (Location = estar/estás).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arctinus

'Where are you?' would be '¿Dónde estás?'. 'Dónde' means 'where', and 'de dónde' means 'where from', so '¿De dónde eres?' means 'Where are you from?'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judith58

How would you ask ' where are you?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsPuddles

¿Dónde estás? is Where are you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EchoZulu70

How about ¿dónde eres? does it make any sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

It makes no sense (unless perhaps you are being religious or philosophical, I guess).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kit-n-caboodle

Can you explain how that is please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annapolis143

I think, the use of Ser is to indicate permenent things, like... name, place, relations... etc.. And Estar for temporary situations, like.. feelings ... etc (that lasts only for some time)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

When asking about location, you need to use estar. Asking with ser wouldn't make sense (as far as I know).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrMOOstachE34

Why is "from" first?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen908

Spanish is a romantic language, and has roots directly in Latin. Latin is a language that never put the preposition at the end of a sentence, requiring it to be first in a phrase instead. This rule still applies in Spanish.

If you ever forget, just remember the word class, 'preposition'. 'Pre' and 'position'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

In addition to perhaps being a "romantic language", it is also a "Romance language", meaning that it is derived from the language of the Romans.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

That's how Spanish works. The preposition needs to be in front of the object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sumanyu5

Please explain the sentence formation from English to Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David537053

I said "Where do you live" Is that not the same ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arctinus

That would be '¿Dónde vives?' (informal) and '¿Dónde vive (usted)?' (formal). :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benescaglayan

where is subject "tu"? shouldn't it be "de donde eres tu?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

It's not needed. Spanish is a pro drop language, meaning you can omit the subject pronouns in most cases. Since eres can only have as a subject, we don't need to state that pronoun. It's a little less clear with 3rd person forms, since the subject can be él, ella, or usted, but they are often omitted if the context makes it clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benescaglayan

If I always form my sentences with subjects, will I get bad looks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Use them for now. You'll become more comfortable with dropping them as time goes on. Don't let it discourage you.


[deactivated user]

    Also.. Tu might not be needed here because Tu means you, but eres means 'are you'.. So the 'you' is already included in the sentence, therefore, no need of 'Tu'...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenZelahHoward

    tu is your and tù is you The assent is what make them different...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArchStanton173

    "Where're you from" is accepted. Good.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickLockwood

    I'm English. Whence is a word that has not been used for over a 100 years in common English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardGil10

    This seems to me to be the "who/whom" argument. I for one am against the pablumisation ( new word) of the English language and applaud the use of "Whence " should one so desire!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simplicity22

    "Whence are you?" I have never heard that phrasing in English...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen908

    It is an uncommon word in English today, but it is still acceptable to use in English, according to the dictionary.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_SweetDiPa_

    I wrote where are you from.... and it shows wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vikhas1

    Can it be donde eres de


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen908

    No. Spanish does not support ending a phrase with a preposition. It would sound awkward to a Spanish-speaker, like you only said half of a sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AudioGirlPlayz

    HOW....i put where are you from and it was wrong......-.-


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rozgol70N2

    In fact, making sentence and pronouncing finglish and the location of words is very similar to Persian in terms of grammar.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tony121600

    Woman speaks too fast!!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tony121600

    Man speaking OK. Woman too fast and garbled


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickOko14

    I honestly didn't know because of dondè


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luciofher

    dónde is used in questions, and donde in affirmative sentences. (the accent only goes to the right).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickOko14

    I honestly didn't know because of the donde


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BorjeOtter

    Imposible, it's hopless. When I answer the question"de donde eres?" / Where are you form? It gives me wrong answer??????


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BorjeOtter

    It's a scandal, I have the right answer and the program says wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luciofher

    read your answers, thta can't happen.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BorjeOtter

    Still the same problem!!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

    If you post your answer we may be about to help you find the error.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VickyVerma7

    Why there's no tú ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luciofher

    cause the subject is optional.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen908

    To add to what luciofher said, the subject is optional because it is implied by the sentence. "Eres" is the tú form of "ser", meaning the tú is already implied by the conjugation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reine616556

    From where are you from is not the same?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

    No, you cannot use from twice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denki_Chan

    I put in "where do you hail from" and I got it wrong. I think duo answers should have more diversity :>


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lindentree00

    من وين تكون؟ = حرفياً


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naderbesada

    Is this the kind of expression where you learn it as is, kind of like "Mucho Gusto" where if you translate it word for word, it wouldn't make sense.?

    If you translate "¿De dónde eres?" wouldn't you get "From where you are?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen908

    Well, no, it's not really one of those phrases. The full sentence is actually, "¿De dónde eres tú," which directly translates to, "From where are you," which is considered a grammatically acceptable phrase in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

    Better, "from where are you."?
    In English questions, the subject- verb order is typically reversed (to Verb-subject) (just as in Spanish).

    But "From where are you" is still not a good translation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen908

    Of course. I was simply providing a direct translation, as naderbesada was asking if, "¿De dónde eres?" is directly translated to, "From where you are," which it is not.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen908

    Considering my comment is currently sitting on at least two downvotes, I would appreciate it if someone would explain what they disagreed with. I cannot fix any potential errors in my logic without feedback.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diosmi-o-my

    I guess people are trying to point out that Spanish (and other Romantic languages) does not put their preposition in the end of the sentence like in English. So 'De' is written in the start of the sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cory670651

    I just dont understand why De is at the start of this sentence..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

    Unlike English, Spanish doesn't allow the separation of a preposition from its object. English allows you to move of to the end, Spanish does not.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WinterGirl18

    Because De means where


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

    De doesn't mean where.

    De - from

    Dónde - where


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AstroMikeySKR

    Why is from where are you incorrect?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaialanae08

    WOO HOO! I got it right.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shingod

    hey don't you guys in America say "Where from?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2seis

    Is it okay to use ¿Dónde de eres?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cherrytree2030

    "From where are you?" - Why is this marked wrong, when "Where are you from?" is shown as correct? Both questions mean the same thing in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cherrytree2030

    I got marked incorrect for "From where are you?"
    Why is this marked wrong, when "Where are you from?" is shown as correct? Both questions mean the same thing in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gunmashi

    I wrote "where are u from?" This is the same... I only wrote u instead of you


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank22221971

    why not" Donde eres de" how can the first word in the three in Spanish for in English be the last word of the sentence


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luciofher

    These lenguages (spanish and english) have evolved in a different way, so is normal that you can't just translate word by word. These "basic" sentences are usually hard to analyse, it's better just to memorize them.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shirley615508

    I left the "r" out of where and it was marked wrong!! I have made small typos before that had nothing to do with anything. so why now??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elista13

    My answer was correct and it said wrong...????


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanahanP

    What are other ways of asking someone where they are from


    [deactivated user]

      Does anyone know why and when we have to put accents on certain words in Spanish ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David995042

      I think it means that the syllable containing the accented letter is stressed when spoken.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chavi49594

      I wrote : were are you from instead of wHere are you from. It gave it to me wrong


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

      Your answer is wrong.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abk2zm

      Me: De donde eres Random person: what? Me: De donde eres-_-? Random person: sorry what did you say Me: DE DONDE ERES!! Me: did you hear now Random person mind: WHAT THE FRICK?!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sumanyu5

      For sure, the Random person doesn't want you to talk to him (in Spanish).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tequilanights

      Is there anything wrong in saying "From where are you?", as is seems to make more sense to me?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luciofher

      Do you actually say that as a native speaker? Cause that's not grammatically correct in english.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haakon161630

      could it not be "whence are you from" in this instance?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tg95Wp4m

      so far i haven't taken any lesson using this phrase, or It is my name


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

      You only learn new words or phrases by being given new words or phrases.

      Be happy you are learning something.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcuslawsk

      Could you not say 'Where you from?'. I ask because I'm not sure if this is grammatically correct (most likely not), but is a form I find very commonly used colloquially here. For instance 'where you been?' 'where you off to?' 'where you going this summer?'. It is very common to drop the 'are' during informal exchanges.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sperry68

      That is slang though for Where are you from.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amanda352067

      I think it's where are you? I'm waiting at the bar for my buddy he takes forever to show up. I call him,what do i ask


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

      No, that a totally different sentence.

      ¿Dónde estás? - where are you?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riddhi369088

      I think this sentence is wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

      The English and Spanish are correct. Can you explain what you think is wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valerie940151

      My answer should have be exempted there was nothing wrong, only that you havent used your grammar THE RIGHT WAY.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

      The given answer is grammatically correct.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torpify

      De donde eres? From where, you are? => Where are you from?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

      I'm sorry, but from where you are? makes no sense in English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MossQuartz

      From where are you? Whence are you? Wherefrom (archaic word) are you? You are from where? (DuoLingo wants me to end a sentence with a preposition, "from.")


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

      You can end a sentence in a preposition. It's a natural part of the language and breaks no grammar rules.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen908

      As Daniel said, it's perfectly acceptable. Phrases such as, "What are you so afraid of," "Turn that off," "The dynamite blew up," etc. show this to be the case.

      This is not the language naturally evolving either, it has simply been the case for hundreds of years. The misconception that a preposition cannot be at the end of a sentence most likely stems from the 17th to 18th century, when writers that were obsessed with Latin attempted to bring some of that language's rules into English.

      Now, I am not trying to imply that beginning a sentence with a preposition is wrong either. Both options are accepted in the English language as perfectly valid.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kat.bell_

      wouldn't "where do you live" also be correct


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ziaheart

      I was born in Korea and now I live in Canada. The questions "Where are you from (De dónde eres)" and "Where do you live (Dónde vives)" would get different answers from me, and I'm sure many others. :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sumanyu5

      The sentences "where do you live" and "where are you from" convey two different questions. I.e- you may not live presently at the place where you do actually belong to. To say "where do you live" you may use : "¿dónde vives? Or For formal conversation you may use : "¿Dónde vive usted?.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laith93e

      Spanish sentence formation is quite like Arabic sentence formation .. mostly they have the same order .. thats why "De donde eres" in Arabic is "من أين أنت" .. De = من Donde = أين Eres = أنت Thanks to the islamic Andalusi state that ruled spain for centuries of prosperity and luxury


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

      Actually, they inherited that word order from Latin. You can see this in Portuguese, French, and Italian, so it's not likely borrowed from Arabic.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slepax

      Any Semitic language have that sentence structure, where Arabic is just one of many Semitic languages. And Spanish originated from Latin, not any of the Semitic languages.

      Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.