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  5. "Yo cojo los platos y tú coge…

"Yo cojo los platos y coges los vasos."

Translation:I'm taking the plates and you're taking the glasses.

June 4, 2018

61 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tetraplasm

Coger is very rude in Mexican spanish. Source: my girlfriend was born and raised there. It might be slang or unofficial, but that doesn't matter. It's akin to teaching someone new to english that "❤❤❤❤❤" means "cat." Technically right but dangerous and people will snicker.

June 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elvolcanchapin

Correction: Coger is very rude in Latin American Spanish. I lived in Guatemala for 2 years among people from many countries in Latin America, and it was very vulgar to everyone I talked to. I wish Duolingo would just use agarrar instead, which has a similar meaning to coger without the vulgarity.

July 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMoore622957

The thing is, it's a very very commonly used word in Spain, without the baggage. Those of us learning Spanish primarily to spend time in Spain appreciate having opportunities to practice the word's usage.

September 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew117235

Except it would be like teaching people to speak English using the word "❤❤❤❤" and saying "Well, I'm learning it to go to Australia, not the US." It's very vulgar in most parts of the Spanish-speak world.

October 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tejano

Except there are important parts of the Spanish-speaking world where -when used in the proper context - it is not vulgar at all. And speaking of English, we certainly DO have such words that can be vulgar in certain contexts and not in others. Bottom line, the greater disservice to users here would be to pretend this one doesn't exist.

I suggest reading through the comments here

http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/262020/use-of-coger

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/coger

before banning this word, which does not yet always mean what it's said to mean here.

December 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Virginia71473

If it's the word I'm guessing you mean (if jpobregonsr is right), it's not OK to bandy around in Australia either!

December 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertasmi12

Some of us have Mexican kids (adopted) and I most certainly do not want to offend families in Mexico.

December 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GMgOFl

Why not teach us a word that is acceptable everywhere instead of certain areas of the world? Unnecessary baggage.

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tejano

And what of those who are interested in learning what is appropriate in those "certain areas of the world?" Why not teach them what they need? For them, it's not "unnecessary baggage" at all.

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tejano

According to me, Duolingo should teach Spanish for the benefit of those who want to learn Spanish – which is what it does. Yes, the word in question does carry a sexual meaning in some cases, and while it does so exclusively in, say, Argentina, in others that raw meaning depends on context, just as some English words can take on vulgar meanings in certain contexts, but not in others. In Colombia, Chile, Peru, and Spain (ah, but we shouldn't bother learning the language as it pertains to that insignificant country, right?) the word is commonly used in a variety of its original, non-vulgar contexts.

http://dle.rae.es/?id=9fC4QbW

https://spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/8749/en-qu%C3%A9-pa%C3%ADses-la-palabra-coger-tiene-connotaciones-sexuales

But then again, your "impeccably reasoned" analogy regarding "pop" and "soda" doesn't address vulgarity at all, but seems to demonstrate that (according to you) Duo shouldn't waste our time with synonyms.

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GMgOFl

Tejano- Get over it. I merely pointed out that they should teach the word with the most general usage globally. Your self-righteous explanation is completely flawed. Here's an example according to your logic- In the midwest of the US, all sodas are referred to as pop. According to you, duolingo should teach using the word "pop" instead of sodas because some people want to visit that area of the US.. A much more reasonable approach would be to teach the word soda and let the student learn "pop" based upon experience.

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enzo961200

Elvolcanchapin not everyone is using Duolingo to learn Latin American Spanish. Some people are learning European Spanish. And Duolingo teaches Spanish with all its varieties.

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hotblack66

Spanish is one of the most popular languages to learn and there are two very distinct versions of it, European and Latin American. I've posted before about the need for both to be available on this site as it could put off some people that don't want to learn things that are clearly wrong for their country. This is an American site and it's geared more towards the Latin American version which means I need to look elsewhere for the missing European Spanish bits. How hard can it be to cut and paste the majority of this lesson into a new Euro version and add the missing bits? That way we learn it correctly without accidentally insulting people.

September 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMoore622957

I'm not sure it would be that easy. Even if Duo separated Spain Spanish from Latin American Spanish, there would still be an issue with "coger," for example, because it's perfectly fine in parts of Latin America.

Check this link for a view of the tip of the iceberg. And I say this as someone who would welcome an Iberian Spanish tree.

September 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hotblack66

Looking at the list of languages available from English, if Duo can waste it's time on junk like Klingon then they should be able to find some time to split the worlds most popular language. As you say, there are a few words that have different meanings in South America but not enough to really worry about but there are a huge number of differences between Iberian and non Iberian. Anyway, it doesn't look like Duo will be splitting them anytime soon so I will have to use other sites for the corrections.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pat92981

Ditto !

July 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andre_8121

Here in Peru we use it just like in European Spanish, not rude at all. Hence your statement is wrong.

May 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spiceyokooko

Mrs Slocombe would have something to say about that, but you need to be British and of a certain age to 'get that one'!

:D

June 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George418878

"It wins a prize every time I show it"

November 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dutchesse722

Tired of the whole "coger" debate? I am. Here's some history about this verb, and which Spanish-speaking countries it safe to use it in a non-vulgar way.

"Coger" comes from Latin "colligere" (to grab with both hands), and it was used normally. However, in the Middle Ages in Spain, people in the street slang began to use it with the sense of grabbing a woman with your hands... in order to perform a sexual ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤, even though the verb was still used to mean "to take" as well. The sexual meaning travelled to the Americas and it became the norm in many countries, while in others like Spain or Cuba, the sexual usage was forgotten, and kept only for farm animals, like cows and bulls.

In countries like Mexico or Panamá, most speakers (especially educated ones) are aware of both meanings, but common people find it hard to resist making jokes about the sexual meaning. In countries like Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay the term is used practically only with the sexual meaning, and in countries like Colombia, Peru, Spain or Cuba is a neutral word." From: https://www.spanishdict.com/answers/116078/coger-word-of-the-day.

On another note: I've been watching a TV series set in Colombia & Spain and and I've been hearing "coger" used in a non-vulgar manner.

March 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jpobregonsr

Yeah, I have noticed that Duolingo uses a lot of words that don't get used on this side of the Atlantic. Latin Americans would NEVER use "coger" or any form of it, because it is used as the "f word" here in the Americas.

July 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piccolute74

In Ecuador, at least the region I lived in, this was used very commonly. To the point it's hard for me to think of other words to use instead. I'm still trying to get used to using arreglar now that I'm in the US.

March 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enzo961200

In Colombia (some) people use coger. So you're really wrong

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tejano

No, he's not really or completely wrong, just partly wrong, especially to say "Latin Americans." But you are correct that, in some countries or regions, the word doesn't carry the vulgar connotation mentioned. However, non-native speakers should take some care in how and where they use it.

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrasmt

Does it have to be I'll take? I wrote I'm taking and it's denied

June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tejano

"Get" or "getting" should also be accepted.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/coger

August 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enzo961200

tejano get is conseguir, not coger/tomar

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tejano

Sorry, but you are in error. Yes, of course, "conseguir" is the most common translation of "get." But read the link I provided (you didn't, did you?) and take note of the first three meanings given for "coger," which are "to grab," "to take," and "to get." Besides that, to understand all possible translations you should always consider the available synonyms in the target language. In English, "get" is an enormously flexible word with many meanings. Get it?

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enzo961200

Yes. I know that. But get doesn't directly mean coger/tomar

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tejano

Well, yes, "get" does directly mean coger/tomar as well as a host of other words, depending on context. So, no, apparently you don't know that.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/to%20get

(See entries 20 and 21)

But you know what? I'm going to leave you to your misguided self-assurance and let you think what you will. Good luck .

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enzo961200

I say it doesn't mean directly that because get can have a lot of meanings. But well, don't be angry. Good luck too

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

Stop fighting you two! To be honest, I am never going to use the verb "coger" if at all possible, just to be on the safe side. Besides, it is making me snigger doing these exercises, which won't do because I am old enough to know better than that.

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tbc63
  • 1014

I believe that I'm taking is fine. Reported.

July 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juan14858

the only translations I can find for cojo or cojes is "screw" and other bad words...what is the infinitive for these words?

June 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/archerb1

The following link shows the infinitive form as coger, which means to grab or take. It also has full conjugation and examples. However, Google Translate also shows various meanings that one would most likely want to avoid. https://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/coger

July 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crf.

As others have said, the infinitive is "coger" and literally means "to take". It is actually very commonly used in Spain, but should definitely not be used in Latin America, where it will generally be understood as "❤❤❤❤". In Spain, "follar" is used for that meaning.

It seems to me that it's probably best to understand "coger" but to also completely avoid using it. It looks like "tomar" is a safer alternative for taking a mode of transport (tomar un autobús) and "llevar" for carrying items (llevar un vaso). I'm not sure whether or not DL will accept that for this exercise, though... I haven't been asked this question in that direction yet.

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jpobregonsr

The infinitive is "coger"

July 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Treecie

DL gave me an English translation "...picking up"... I wrote I pick the plates and you pick the glasses. DL said it was not right. I think this should be correct. To pick "up" is recoger. Right?

September 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMoore622957

I think the issue is that Duo is using the verb to talk about clearing the table. If you were talking about choosing place settings from a catalog or store, however, "pick" would be perfectly fine.

I believe Duo uses elegir and escoger when they talk about picking something. I'm not saying you're wrong. You're actually correct. I'm just saying why I think Duo rejected your (correct) translation.

September 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enzo961200

Coger is the infinitive form and it can also mean to pick up, to take. Depending on the dialect it means that or to f*ck

October 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GayraudWil

What is the difference between coger, agarrar, and tomar?

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enzo961200

Agarrar is more like grabbing it hard. Coger is just grabbing it. This is what RAE says. Tomar is more like coger than agarrar. However, in a lot of Latin American countries, coger means to ❤❤❤❤. It's vulgar. Coger as take is more used in Spain. Tomar can also mean to drink, and it's a synonymous of beber. I hope you've understood

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/60tvaldez

¿quién coje los amigos? jejejejeje

November 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/learnerbeginner

I wrote I take the plates and you get the glasses, and this was not accepted. I reported it.

February 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/learnerbeginner

cojo also means crippled or lame, as adjective.

March 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaulSnatsky

I had a problem with the present progressive rather than simply the present indicative. I do not know why Duo says that "I take the plates and you take the glasses" is incorrect. I'll ask Duo to consider my answer correct.

March 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrepaulrobert

agree

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaulSnatsky

Over such a minor thing so many angry words. Try to be more civil. I'm not following this discussion now.

May 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angela411870

It counted my answer wrong because I put you are instead of you're....

May 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidlanc16

DANG! Seems like Duo is teaching me that I'm going to get a divorce! :D

July 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisRawso3

Guys, we got it, coger is rude! Let's move on with our lives.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/les858045

Its the same your or you're same another translation

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tbc63
  • 1014

you are, your, and your're are quite different things

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew117235

Coger means something much, much different in Mexico and other parts of Central America and the Spanish Caribbean. lol You shouldn't be doing that to a plate or glasses.

October 17, 2018
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