"Yo tengo los mensajes de la secretaria."

Translation:I have the messages from the secretary.

June 4, 2018

114 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aytidaalkuhs

If this sentence translates to "I have the messages FROM the secretary", how are we supposed to say "I have the messages OF the secretary"?

June 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

Better English would be "the secretary's messages", (rather than "of the secretary."

July 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

This was accepted.

July 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

Right. The OF or FROM can be excluded.

”I have the secretary's messages."

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GladysS.1

I was marked incorrect for using from

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Report it, although I think the secretary's messages is the best translation as it is the most common way to say it and has the same range of meaning as the Spanish, unlike using of, from or for

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robotdjuret

So was I. I'm reporting it for sure.

February 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robin455005

Not for me

November 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YasminMull6

Mine was not accepted

July 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarimaFaus

I agree

June 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LizL218441

I agree

July 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorongDoom1960

Both are correct. 'From' is when you got the messages from the secretary and 'Of' is when have seen the messages somewhere (on a publication board) and spread the news.

June 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aytidaalkuhs

DL did not allow the "OF" version hence I was curious. Thanks for the clarification

June 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

They do now.

August 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5oO4iYAv

I was marked wrong for OF. Isnt that what DE means?

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Literally yes. I see I did say it was accepted for me last year, but from the down votes apparently it was a fluke. De is normally translated as of or from, but it is also used for the Spanish possessive. Duo has been trying to push users to choose the more English possessive form rather than using any preposition. They want that conversion to take place almost before you decode the rest of the sentence. That automatic conversion will help you a lot when you are trying to understand the stream of Spanish coming at you in real time. But you certainly can report if you want to. I just don't think the messages of the secretary would be said by a native English speaker.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/60tvaldez

no they don't

October 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonyhay

In England you would not say the message of the secretary

July 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Probably not in the U.S. either.

October 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Yes. The de la/del is seldom directly translated into English. Generally the relationship between the two nouns is reflected in English by either a possessive or by a noun modifying another noun like kitchen table. Here I think secretary's messages is the best English. It conveys the same ambiguity as the Spanish. Although using a prepositional phrase in English is not wrong, just stringy and uncommon, using one here prompts one to do something to eliminate the ambiguity. That's why, I assume, for the secretary has been accepted. But I am pretty sure that if that English sentence were given to us to translate Duo would want to see para.

October 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

Writing centers that teach English writing say to reduce the unnecessary uses of a prepositional phrase for the possessive. Such reduction makes for better writing. Here is one such writing center. https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/CCS_prepphrases.html

Another reference: https://www.proofreadnow.com/blog/bid/91213/Possessives-in-of-Phrases

December 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Oh absolutely. As I said they are a good example of stringy writing. I am, among other things, an editor, and in almost all cases I would edit that out. But there is a difference between saying that it doesn't make concise, powerful prose and it being grammatically incorrect. I used to be a total prescriptionist in terms of Grammar. I used The Elements of Style by Strunk and White as a reference and that was first published in 1918 so it was already a little behind the time by the time I got to it. But stringy writing will never come into style for effective writing. Speaking, however, has a whole different set of rules even including people who intentionally make an error for effect. But even in the spoken language it is unusual unless there is a strange complication in the possession.

December 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

aytidaalkuhs
"I have the secretary's messages." is accepted. And that is the correct way to say what you intend to say.

"I have the messages OF the secretary" is wordy and clumsy.

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dodoyce

It may be wordy but it's not clumsy. Remember contractions in english! "The messages of the secretary" when contracted becomes "The secretary's messages."

BOTH are grammatically correct. BOTH mean possession.

August 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I would call not taking advantage of commonly used linguistic shortcuts clumsy as well. Yes both sentences are grammatically correct and both sentences assume possession. But one of the many hats I have worn in my life is editor, and I would edit the messages of the secretary virtually every time. The only exception would be for dialog if the intended impact was that the speaker was somehow struggling with his thoughts or communication in general. It's pretty much the definition of clumsy speech

August 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

How about "wordy" if not clumsy. And I do see that, in the right context, "message of the secretary" can be OK.

(an editor, and article reviewer for professional journals.)

August 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

That is not a contraction.

August 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

You are correct. "The secretary's messages" involves possession, not contraction.

Have a lingot.

August 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJdkI9R8

Whoa!... I was told the right answer was "I have the messages for the secretary."

October 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

As I said above, I don't think that's the best translation in terms of being strictly literal, but the use of prepositions is never completely consistent between languages. If you look at my analysis of the various possibilities of de and even adding in por and para, they are circle around the fact that the messages can either be ones the secretary may have taken for someone else or messages from someone else to the secretary. But in both cases for might be used in English. So it is an accepted answer. But the preferred answer is the one shown at the top of the discussion from the secretary. The ambiguity here means that there are several possible distinct answers. But it doesn't take much context for you to not even question the meaning in a particular case.

October 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJdkI9R8

Many thanks for taking the time to clearly explain all these possibilities.

October 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adyn338386

i got it wrong for spelling secretary wrong

December 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveNewhouse

welcome to the club. ougr happens but it is important to use proper spelling. i message with various spanish speaking people that use por spelling. it makes translating much harder that way. Although i will agree it is frustrating but duo has no way of knowing our thought.....yet....i dont think..... have you seen duos eyes follow you across the screen!!! ok warped humor as i wait for my car to be repaired.

December 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Wrong is wrong. Duo does have some programming to try to determine typos, but that's difficult for a computer to do any way, let alone having to consider two languages in the mix. When you make a mistake that Duo recognizes as a typo, consider it a gift.

December 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenoitVanL1

Both forms ARE correct The messages FROM (given to me by) the secretary. The messages OF (written by) the secretary

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ODubhghaill

The word "secretary's" is missing from the word bank.

June 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

I just typed it in.

July 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Did you report it?

October 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorongDoom1960

"secretary's office" or "secretariat" I would suggest.

June 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

No.

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWallace0

"I have the secretary's messages" - accepted 8th July 2018

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bvnni

OK. How about I have the secretary's messages, as in I have messages left from others for the secretary?

July 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

It is accepted, and, as far as translation goes, the best translation.

July 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

I believe so.

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

Not very good English construction.

July 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/why660475

What is the difference between "para" and "de" How do you know which to use where?

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

It's complicated. A good start is this dictionary. http://www.spanishdict.com/

September 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Butsuzu.vega

I couldn't find the difference.

September 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Another good option is Google. Just type in the question.

That's what I do.

October 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveNewhouse

Do you find google to have errors often times in genders and tenses ?

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

I wasn't referring to Google Translate.

But;, for the difference between "para" and "de", I would just type that in.

Regards Google translate -- I find that it is usually better than me. But at times, I send corrections to Google Translate.

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

I just now typed that into Google. Are are some answers (resources) I received:
https://www.spanishdict.com/answers/238248/what-are-the-differences-between-por-de-and-para

https://www.rocketlanguages.com/spanish/prepositions/spanish-prepositions-a-de-en-hacia-and-con

Note that "para" and "de" are very different. It would be better to search for each separately.

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuchPotato

"Messages from" and "messages for" are accepted. Both mean different things so is context the only way to tell the actual meaning?

May 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

The "actual meaning" is "the secretary's messages". This English expression can also mean either messages that the secretary has taken for someone else or messages intended for the secretary. At first blush most people would read this as messages taken by the secretary, but that is due to the nature of a secretary's job not the grammar. In the correct context this sentence could mean either on both languages.

As a general rule you should always view constructions like article+noun+de+article+noun as either a possessive or a double noun in English. Las llaves de la casa. The house keys. La bolsa de mi tía, My aunt's bag. There are certainly a few cases where this wouldn't be the most common translation. For example El fin del mundo would more probably be translated as the end of the world than the world's end, but the world's end is not incorrect. And there are many more cases where using the English noun noun or possessive constructions sounds more natural. And in cases like this, it will show you how amazing context can be in eliminating ambiguity. It's only through this translation process that I recognized the possessive as potentially ambiguous. But I don't think I have often, if ever, misunderstood this in English.

May 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonty.2

Shouldn't it be 'del' instead of 'de la'?

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

No. Secretaria can be masculine if the secretary is a man. But office secretaries are still mostly women. The secretaries in the cabinet are mostly referred to as Ministro/a.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

Let me add to the confusion about the different ways to say stuff in English here.

I wrote: "I have the messages for the secretary."

And it was correct.

August 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

That's interesting. I wonder if that is actually a meaning that a Spanish speaker would likely understand or if Duo just got tired/lazy. That translation does, however, has a distinct alternative translation that makes for the obvious translation: para. But it is quite possible that in informal language settings that this might be interpreted as the same thing. Either from or of or the possessive pretty much has to be de. I guess the issue is that theoretically the secretary's messages could be either messages FROM the secretary or messages FOR the secretary.

August 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

Which way it would mean would be according to how the subject matter has been being talked about.

Perhaps someone just said, "¿Quien tiene los mensajes para de la secretaria?" ("Who has the messages for the secretary?")

The English translation of the response could then be, "I have the messages for the secretary."

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BerntFolle

I also wrote "I have the messages FOR the secretary." and got correct, but duolingo suggests: "Another correct solution: I have the messages from the secretary." Which I think is the opposite direction for the message of what I and EugeneTiffany wrote. Message is FOR: Recipient is the secretary. Message is FROM: The sender of the message is the secretary. May the spanish sentence be so ambiguous?

December 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

The Spanish sentence is absolutely that ambiguous. The preposition de is normally translated as either of or from. But this ambiguity is also in the best translation of this sentence I have the secretary's messages. Depending on the context, that can be either messages from the secretary directly, the ones she took as part of her function as secretary, or messages for her from when she was out. It's a little less obvious because of the fact that it is the secretary's job to take messages so one direction tends to be assumed. But if you change the pattern to something like I have the boss's flowers it's easier to see. You might have picked up flowers as a gift from the department, you may have mistakenly received them, or you may have received flowers from your boss. When you have two nouns separated by a preposition like here, the English translation is most often à double noun, compound noun or possessive.

La puerta del coche - car door

La hermana de mi madre - my mother's sister

La alfombra de baño - bathmat.

December 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnMcBrid900465

I answered this, "of the secretary." Duolingo called my answer wrong and said the correct answer was "for the secretary. I agree, "the secretaries messages," would sound best. However, in all the scrolling I could do using Spanishdict.com, NOWHERE did I see the word "for" listed.

October 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

No that's definitely Duo taking a indefendable position on an English translation. I think that Duo is trying to explain the answer a little because it is somewhat ambiguous. But even for can be ambiguous. It could be that you have messages taken by somebody where the secretary is the ultimate recipient in which case for would be para. But it could also be that you are doing the secretary a favor by bringing the messages that s/he had taken for the other person. In that case for would be por. But por and para in Spanish actually eliminate the ambiguity we have with of or from, although the distinction between of and from is about the same as por and para.

October 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

It may sound OK, but "secretaries messages " is an incorrect spelling of the possessive "secretaries' messages" (plural "secretary" or of "secretary's messages" (singular "secretary").

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ali532402

Having read the thread I still do not understand the meaning. The messages are: - the ones I received from the secretary; - or the ones I need to pass to the secretary; - or they are just her messages that do not have any connection to me, but I had somehow get hold of them?

Can some native speaker help to understand?

November 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

El problema es con la lenguaje non con el idioma. That sentence is expressed better in Spanish than English. The problem is inherent with this particular phrasing not with any particular language. The best translation for this sentence is perhaps I have the secretary's messages. The fact that saying that doesn't answer ANY of your questions but did result in a perfectly normal and grammatical sentence tells you that it is the message itself that is ambiguous. There are many possibly ambiguous things that we say and hear every day. Most of them don't even seem ambiguous in the moment because the context assists us in determining meaning without us even being aware of how we resolved the ambiguity or mostly even that there was any. Conversely, most of us commonly ask simple clarifying questions also without thinking about it because if we notice the ambiguity in our own language we realize that it just happens sometimes. When it is our own language, we recognize the problem isn't with our own ability to understand. All the possibilities that you expressed exist in this sentence in Spanish, English, and all the languages I know, although it is certainly possible for a language to develop terminology or grammatical structure that would clarify a particular type of ambiguity. But I doubt there is a language without inherent ambiguity

November 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

The Spanish is just as ambiguous as "I have the secretary's messages" is in English.

November 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lwtexas

I translated the sentence this way and it counted it correct:" I have the messages FOR the secretary". I'm not sure how you would know "de" means FROM or FOR and how can both translations be correct because they are 2 different meanings.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Yes. They are One of the issues here is that, because of the role of a secretary, there is some concept people may have in terms of whose messages since most secretaries take messages as part of their job. But if you remove that concept from consideration and look at the the de clause as simply possession of the secretary's messages. The secretary's messages can either be messages taken by someone else for the secretary or those taken by the secretary for someone else. So, since the term secretary's messages has potentially the same ambiguity as los mensajes de la secretaria, I think that is the best translation. The translation The messages of the secretary is the same, although stringy English. The possessive is preferred. The messages from the secretary can also be a literal translation. The messages for the secretary is not literal. That would be para la secretaria. Had it been my call, I probably would not have accepted The messages for the secretary, but that would have garnered lots of criticism based on it being a good meaning.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

"de" can mean "of" and in this case show that they are for the secretary, or from here. All languages have sentences that can mean multiple things. It's called ambiguity.

For example: "I saw the child with binoculars." In this example, am I looking through binoculars or does the child have binoculars? It could mean either.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoashmo

Not a direct question. But bc la could be the or her how do you know, in a situation like this, which is right or wrong?

Either the or her could be used and it would still make sense.

April 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

You have a couple of issues there. In the above sentence la absolutely can not be her. La is only the direct object pronoun her (As in I hit her). As such in the above sentence it would have to be Yo la tengo, but of course that doesn't make sense because los mensajes is the direct object of the sentence. To use the possessive adjective her, as in her secretary, you would need su, which is also the possessive adjective for his, formal you singular and plural, or their. It's not very specific which is why Spanish does have a lot of a él or de ellos additions.

April 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MayCabral

It didn't accept ' of the secretary ' on 24 may 2019

May 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julio404727

Should allow of!

June 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

The only reason to allow of is that it is one of the standard translations for de. But no native English speaker would probably ever say this. The best translation is actually almost always going to be the possessive for something like this. The secretary's messages. It is the most common way for a native speaker to say it. And Duo recently has introduced many new exercises which attempt to solidify the connection in the students mind between the Spanish noun de noun and the English possessive noun noun or just noun noun. Las llaves del coche, The car keys. La casa de mi madre, My mother's house, los padres del niño, The boy's parents

June 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heyti

I have the secretary's messages. Not accepted.

July 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

That was probably a Duo fluke. I have answered this question several times that way with no issue. I tend to report them any way, and those are the ones that come back really fast with "we now accept that answer". But whether you report it or not it should work for you next time.

July 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomas167628

wants you to copy in Spanish, Incorrect ,because answer is in English translation.

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandallMit2

She sounds like she says "las secretarias" do I just guess?!!!

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

No. You hone your listening skills. It is significant that you are the only one who has reported this issue. I am really not trying to disparage your issue. Most people have had some particular thing they have had a problem hearing. But here I can't identify any element that might particularly have effected how you hear this sentence, or at least the last part. Obviously the s from las would blend with the initial s from secretarias so you would normally not hear the difference in the beginning. It all hangs on why you would hear an s at the end. I can't hear it, and obviously most people didn't either. When there is a funky recording or even just a faster one, the comment section is full of people saying that they heard something different. All I can suggest is to keep playing recording till you don't hear the final s, or hope this is just an abberation.

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bryce618401

Tengo los mensajes de la secretaria. ( Tengo ) ( los mensajes ) ( de ) ( la secretaria ). ( I have ) ( the messages ) ( of ) ( the secretary). I have the messages of the secretary. If I put " I have messages from the secretary . ", then "de" en la oracion en español would call for la palabra " desde" instead of "de". To whomever responsible for this matter, the list of acceptable answers needs updating. Thanks.

Bryce out. End.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

This discussion doesn't have any people in it who have either the responsibility for changes or the ability to make them. To report a problem with a particular exercise, you have to use the flag icon. Otherwise you have to email Duo, which is problematic for particular exercises, but can work for program wide issues. But you are actually incorrect in your assertion. De is general defined as of or from, but it actually can be translated many ways in different circumstances. It is perhaps the most common Spanish preposition, and prepositions often are fickle in terms of how some of the translations go. Desde means since or from, and is used to talk about movement through space or time. If you assume that the messages were picked up at the desk outside, I don't think a native Spanish speaker would ever use desde, but I don't know if it would actually sound strange to a native ear. But de as from is MUCH more common. If you wanted to say you were traveling from Paris to Rome, either would work. Viajo de Paris a Roma or Viajo desde Paris a Roma are equally correct, but you will hear de more often. For time, only desde works, and in a range hasta replaces a. Trabajo desde las ocho hasta el mediodia.

But actually, Duo doesn't WANT you to translate de at all. They want you to learn to automatically see a Spanish expression that has the basic formula of noun de noun (with or without article) in the more standard English formula of noun noun or noun's noun. You probably would do that automatically with la casa de mi padre (my father's house) and maybe even with las llaves del coche (the car keys), but many people don't think to turn around all expressions. Obviously Duo often can't mark you off for not doing that, since the other way is always possible in English, but it is trying to design exercises where you would be tempted to. The secretary's messages is actually the best translation here because los mensajes de la secretaria could mean either the messages of (belonging to ) the secretary or the messages from the secretary. That same ambiguity exists when you say the secretary's messages, but not if you choose to translate de at all, because you have to choose one or the other.

This link discusses the many uses of de

https://www.thoughtco.com/using-the-preposition-de-3079327

https://www.spanishdict.com/translate/desde

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emmabeverage

Looks like to me that I got this correct. Of course if you did not obscure our answers, it would be easier to check our work.

September 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donald798622

"Massages" typo...lol

July 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AddyTrunks

Duck

July 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skepticalways

Wow! What a lot of nuance can be perceived just from the use of de la in this sentence! Here's my opinion: the messages are "from the secretary," based on this logic - this whole lesson is about WORK, and for the types of simple sentences and concepts Duo usually gives in lessons, it goes along with a person's idea of what a secretary does for the boss. The secretary deals with the public and leaves the boss notes about who called and why, so the boss can return the calls deemed important. When a boss is in a meeting, or out of the office, a secretary fills that important function, plus usually a lot of typing and filing. So he returns, looks at the messages, therefore has the messages from the secretary.

Of course it can mean other things, including someone else taking notes for the secretary while she's at lunch, and saying they have them to give to her. (Please don't tell me I'm sexist to say "she/her," given it has a feminine ending.) But the purpose of the lesson is to familiarize us with phrases about work people do, therefore I opt for the most common way to express that part of what a secretary does - she gives messages to her boss, so he/she has the messages FROM her.

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cochelito

Duo, you're splitting hairs! Yours is a single sentence and there is no other sentence either before it or after that will give the clue so the preposition " de" can be translated either as " of" or "from".

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

That is true. However the sentence could (should) be translated as the secretary's messages. That answer has the same ambiguity as the de. Of course since we have described the secretary as a secretary and we know that one of the functions of a secretary is to take messages there is some assumption that would be made unless something in the context offered a different interpretation. But the secretary's messages can theoretically be either the messages she has taken for others or messages someone left for her. Thus there is no translation issue.

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaddyBrook

I have no idea why I am getting this wrong and I can't compare the last word because of the error message that covers the last line

April 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

There are a couple of different answers that come up. But one answer that doesn't come up, at least often, but is accepted is I have the secretary's messages. That has the same potential for ambiguity as the Spanish and is therefore less confusing than the messages for the secretary or messages from the secretary. De la secretária could be either from or for, although from tends to be the more likely sentence since one of the jobs of a secretary is to take messages. But the secretary's messages does mean either as well, so I prefer that.

April 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickRockk

This is a hard section

June 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marlene563895

My answer was correct

July 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peggy723023

I typed the exact answer but it was counted wrong.

August 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drake254147

Reported audio incorrect on 7-14-19; speaker states "el" rather than "de".

August 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marielos5404

When I answered this earlier this way, it was incorrect. Please fix. Very confusing.

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Your comment is out of place. To report an error or request a change in the exercise you have to contact the Duo team directly. The easiest way to do that is by clicking the flag icon. But just as a note, when you click the flag icon it captures your answer. If you want feedback from users here, you have to specify what your answer was. Even if the Duo team were to see this message and want to work on it, I don't know if they would understand it either without that captured data.

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

Normally, you can edit your own mistakes. Click on "edit."

September 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BanuAldemir

de la - for the???

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

If you are being word-for-word literal, probably for the is not the best translation. But actually this sentence is potentially ambiguous anyway. The most common translations for de are of and from. The of here is potentially possession (the secretary's messages), and when you think of it even that is potentially ambiguous in English. Are they the secretary's messages because she took the messages for someone or because the messages are for her. The from is somewhat clearer. They are from to the secretary which would cover either messages that she sent by way of you or you have a message directly from the secretary herself which you are conveying.

To clearly be for, you would have to have either para or por. Para would be if the messages were intended for the secretary - she was the end recipient. Por would be if you were conveying messages that the secretary asked you to convey for her, like from. Here is another case where por is similar to per. It wouldn't be common but also not unheard to say I have the messages per the secretary. But all this ambiguity you would probably not even think about if you heard this sentence in context. It only takes a little context to not make you even recognize the potentially ambiguous circumstances. That is actually an issue you will find on Duo from time to time. They don't always recognize all the possible translations because they used a sentence they liked for a particular circumstance and didn't even "hear" the other possibilities.

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emiro23536

I wrote "received" instead of "have" ...rejected. ???

December 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

You won't find the word received listed as a synonym for have in any dictionary or Thesaurus. While the CONCEPT of having messages assumes that you received them at some point previously, it is not the receiving of the messages but rather the possession of the messages that this sentence talks about. When translating on Duo, it is important to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of the vocabulary structure and syntax of the Spanish language, not provide an approximately equivalent sentence. I am assuming that you know at this point of the course that tengo means have. You probably did what I call double translating. You correctly translated the sentence in your head and then rephrase based on the above mentioned idea of what is implied by the sentence in your mind. That can be a valid translation technique if you were translating a literary work where tone and feeling are as important to communicate as meaning in the strictest sense. But this is more like translating in diplomacy. You dare not even tweak the meaning based on your own slant for fear of causing an international incident by not conveying the actual message of the words.

December 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrendanMur14

How does "de" meaning both "from" & "for" work in this above situation?

January 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

De doesn't actually mean for at all. It is normally translated as OF or from. In its translation "of", de represents the normal way of expressing possession without a possessive adjective or pronoun. The secretary's messages can refer to either messages from the secretary or for the secretary. Obviously, since one of the jobs of a secretary is to take messages, without context to the contrary most people would assume that the messages were from the secretary. But with the proper context it wouldn't be strange to have someone have messages FOR the secretary from when she was in a meeting, out to lunch or on vacation. If the previous conversation were about that, saying that you had the secretary's messages would be interpreted as the messages for the secretary. Keeping your eye open for possible ambiguities in Spanish will not only help you communicate more effectively, but also correctly interpret what you hear. Having said all that, I don't really agree with Duo about accepting for as an answer. Los mensajes de la secretaria is best translated as the secretary's messages because it has the SAME ambiguity as the Spanish. But if either an English or a Spanish speaker wanted to say for, they would use a word for for. In Spanish that would be para in the scenario discussed. But Yo tengo los mensajes por la secretaria is also a valid sentence. That would assume that you are doing the secretary a favor by delivering her messages to someone else. Por is, among other things, the preposition of agency.

January 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather799094

'de' means for or from. As I understand, this sentence could therefore be 'I have the messages from the secretary' or 'I have the messages for the secretary' anyone else confused? Am I taking messages from the secretary or giving messages to the secretary?

March 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Is is confusing if you don't remember that possession uses a de. So this could be The secretary's messages. Now, because of the nature of a secretary we tend to assume that the messages were taken by the secretary and brought in - from the secretary. But if I said I have John's messages, depending on the situation that sentence could also mean from or for. In most real life situations the context makes it obvious and we aren't even aware of this potential ambiguity. But is certainly is there. I don't generally preach more elegant translations on Duo because it can often sidestep whatever lesson Duo is trying to teach. But I do recommend that whenever you see two nouns together joined by de (and generally the definite article) that you always think of the English possessive or a noun modifying another noun as you can have in Germanic languages. You know some of them automatically. La casa de mi hermana My sister's house. La Mesa de la cocina The kitchen table, etc. Many times either just putting the nouns together OR using a possessive will both work.

March 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyrynx

Secretaries messages not accepted jan 2018, is this cos said messages were not a possesion of secretary, secretary is a middleman role

January 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Secretaries is not a possesive, it is a plural. The possessive is secretary's. So since the sentence doesn't say de las secretarias, it is not correct. It does accept secretary's, and that is to my mind the best translation here as it has the same possible ambiguities, although only one meaning would probably be assumed lacking context that suggests another in both languages because of the nature of a secretary's job.

January 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Absolutely correct.

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeccaEdnie

Are we trying to learn english here? Seems that way. Geez! Let's skip sentences like these!

August 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

This sentence is a perfectly normal sentence in both Spanish and English. There are many, many sentences in Spanish that have different possible translations. All language is extremely dependent on context, and there are a couple of factors that makes that even truer in Spanish like the practice of omitting subject pronouns. The Spanish construction el/la/los/las X del/de la/(etc) Y ALWAYS will have a couple of possible translations. Possession is always a possibility, especially if you are talking about a living being that we generally consider to possess things, but a sentence like las hojas del libro, the book's pages is also possible. La carta del maestro could be the letter from the teacher, the letter of the teacher or the teacher's letter are all possible. But this sort of sentence you will hear daily if you speak a lot of Spanish and most people don't have any problem with them, unless they don't understand all the possibilities.

August 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

Becca, while in our effort toward becoming fluent in Spanish we ultimately need to abandon all thought about English, there are students here who have minds that are reluctant to give up thinking in English. Many of them like to believe what we need to is learn to do is good translations in our heads so as to be able to converse in Spanish. While Duoling is not in the business of teaching translation, there are many exceedingly vocal students here who like to think Duoling is supposed to be teaching translation so they want Duolingo to be accepting sentences in English in the way they say stuff. Perhaps they will one day see the light and leave off doing that for gaining an understanding that they are supposed to be learning Spanish here and not the different ways something can be said in English. And possibly not.

August 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex326233

Why would they put kids about a SECRETARIA

February 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

What do you mean by kids? Jokes? Children? Baby goats? Your sentence doesn't make sense

February 6, 2019
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