"¿Tú usas el carro?"

Translation:Do you use the car?

4 months ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PeterHewitt

I don't know how to open a discussion so I'm putting it in here. Can someone please tell me why Duolingo does not accept European Spanish? I try to use "el coche" and I'm told it's wrong. Same for many other words where the Spanish use a different word to the latin americans. Forgive my gripe but my interests are in travelling in Europe not the Americas.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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Unfortunately, there are lots of missing answers and we the volunteers have been told not to add any (as yet). Previously, we used to include words from a range of Spanish countries, but now some questions have only one answer.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

OK, I will just continue to report it for now. Thanks for all your help, really enjoying the course.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nancy932168

Try Memrise AP, it focused on European Spanish. (But becareful, they also have a North America/Mexican version.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hszuch
hszuch
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LingoDeer is also a really good app for European Spanish, very similar setup to Duo. It's very picky about word choice, though, so you have to be careful with it

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nancy932168

It appears "do you use," and "are you using" (the car) are both acceptable translations, even though they have different meanings in English.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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They do, but the Spanish presente has a much wider range of meanings than the English "equivalent", and the English present continuous likewise is far broader than the Spanish "equivalent". Maybe they are trying to teach that.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vereschagin
Vereschagin
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Duolingo used to strictly differentiate between these in Spanish. ¿Tú usas el carro? ¿Tú estás usando el carro? That distinction now appears to be gone.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tanyaDavis10

I'm having trouble with usa, uso, usar, usas. Have to keep at it another way.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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usar to use

Uso - I use
Usas - You (familiar) use
Usa - You (formal), he, she uses
Usamos - we use
Usan - You (plural), they use

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bajaca
bajaca
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Trying to understand without looking at the printed words. Difficult to learn the spoken stresses. It sounds like "tu sa sel carro". Going to take a lot of practice. Sigh

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

What a good effort though. I dread to think how I would get on with the audio if I didn't already know Spanish quite well, and I have also got used to the voices used on this course for six months now.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jesus_is_Lord777

You can also use "automobile" for carro

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DakotaGorm
DakotaGorm
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Wouldnt the english translation be did you use the car?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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This isn't past tense, so the only choices would be:

Do you use the car?

Are you using the car?

You use the car?

The last one is a question with a tone of disbelief.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Did you use the car?" would translate as "¿(Tú) usaste el carro?"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MargaretLyons1

It sounds very unnatural in English

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

I agree, so I downvoted the translation, but think I omitted to report it as well. So whoever agrees that the English is not a correct reflection of the Spanish, please report it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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Downvoting the translation does nothing to get it changed. Only the report button will do that.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Thanks for clarifying.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MayaKaplun1

What is the difference between uso usa usar and usas?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Those are verbal conjugations of the same verb. That means that the ending of the verb codifies who is doing the using, like when you put an -s at the end of an English verb for the he/she/it form: to use - I use - he uses. Usar is the infinitive (unconjugated) form, "to use", and in present tense it gets conjugated as follows:

  • yo uso - I use
  • tú usas - you use
  • él/ella usa - he/she uses
  • usted usa - you (formal) use
  • nosotros/-as usamos - we use
  • vosotros/-as usáis - you (plural) use (only used outside of LatAm)
  • ellos/ellas usan - they use
  • ustedes usan - you (plural) use

And since the ending of the verb determines the subject, you can leave the subject pronoun out in the general case. So uso without the yo translates as "I use", and so on.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JennifermMcM

if i was to say carro instead of coche, would i still be understood in spain?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You'd be understood, but it sounds a little weird. Carro mainly means "wagon" or "cart" there.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlfoJr
AlfoJr
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I'm having trouble with "tu' I have seen it used with and without an accent for "you" ....I was understanding that tu without an accent meant "you" while tu' with the accent meant "your"....what's the case? I did not put the accent and it said I was wrong.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It's the other way around. (with the accent) is the subject pronoun "you". You can use it if "you" are doing something. (But it's often not used because personal subject pronouns are mostly dropped: ¿Usas el carro?)

Tu (without the accent) is the possessive pronoun "your". Like in "Me gusta tu casa" - I like your house.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlfoJr
AlfoJr
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Thank you!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katie.lynn3

I have a really hard time telling the difference between usa, usar, uso, etc, when it comes to grammar. Is there a trick for remembering which form is appropriate depending on the context? (Tu, El, Ella, Usted, etc..)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The "context" in that question is the grammatical person of the subject, i.e. who carries out the action. In most European languages there are six of those, differentiated by how they involve in the dialogue and how many they are:

1st person singular - only the speaker: I - yo
2nd person singular - only the listener: you - tú
3rd person singular - one person or object not part of the dialogue: he, she, it - él, ella, (ello)
1st person plural - a group including the speaker: we - nosotros/nosotras
2nd person plural - a group including the listener(s) but not the speaker: you - vosotros/vosotras
3rd person plural - a group that doesn't include speaker or listener: they - ellos/ellas

While English present tense (mostly) only changes the verb for the 3rd person singular - to come, I come, she comes - Spanish does it for each of these grammatical persons. In most cases it's a very predictable pattern of suffixes that get tacked to the verb stem. There are three main types of verbs, depending on which vowel they prefer in their suffixes: -ar, -er, and -ir verbs. Let's look at each:

usar - to use (infinitive)

  • yo uso
  • tú usas
  • él/ella usa
  • nostros usamos
  • vosotros usáis
  • ellos/ellas usan

comer - to eat

  • yo como
  • tú comes
  • él/ella come
  • nosotros comemos
  • vosotros coméis
  • ellos/ellas comen

escribir - to write

  • yo escribo
  • tú escribes
  • él/ella escribe
  • nosotros escribimos
  • vosotros escribís
  • ellos/ellas escriben

It's basically just about associating the subject pronouns with those suffixes.

Now how do usted and ustedes fit in here? They are both 2nd-person pronouns (singular and plural, respectively), so they translate as "you" in English. But they use 3rd-person conjugation. So usted uses the same verb form like él/ella, and ustedes uses the same verb form as ellos/ellas:

  • usted usa, come, escribe
  • ustedes usan, comen, escriben

The reason for using 3rd-person grammar is that usted and ustedes are, traditionally, formal addressings and in olden times it was impolite to directly address someone of a higher status. So instead it was treated as if the person of higher status wasn't even part of the dialogue. Nowadays usted and ustedes are still used as formal addressings outside of Latin America. In Latin America, usted is used formally, and ustedes can be used as either, completely replacing the vosotros form.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertSewa2

Correct answer

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllenSpehr

Why doesn't the course let you select which form of Spanish you choose to pursue such as European versus Latin American before you begin your training and then it could use your IP address to remember your choice.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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That would require another text to speech engine and making alternatives for hundreds of sentences. It's no small task.

Then when you consider that over 90% of what you learn here is directly applicable in Spain, it doesn't make sense for them to allocate resources to another Spanish course instead of adding another language.

2 months ago
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