"Yo leo con mi maestro."

Translation:I read with my teacher.

4 months ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty
stripedkitty
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"I'm reading with my teacher." Not sure why this is not an accepted translation.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2
alfalfa2
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It should be. Did you report it? I did. With all the changes, I think DL failed to take into consideration that many more advanced students know the present progressive in English is expressed in the present indicative in Spanish.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimi287232

Teacher, I wrote professor y they didnt accept. Stupid little things eh?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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A professor is a teacher, but all teachers are not professors. Professor would be “profesor” in Spanish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AidanLenz3

Reading is a different verb conjurgation than read

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
Mod
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Leo can be translated as "I read" or "I am reading". See my post below.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“I am reading” is a different verb tense, but it is often used in English instead of “I read”. Verb tenses are used differently from one language to another. “Yo leo” can mean “I read”, “I am reading” or “I do read”.
https://www.thoughtco.com/ways-spanish-english-verb-tenses-differ-3079929

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/taunya681527

In all previous lesson i had, it was always a mi maestro, and now they dont use the a

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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You don't need a personal a when there's a preposition.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kas334864
Kas334864
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I'm not complaining, but I'd suggest the mods not to use the subject pronoun so often in Spanish sentences. Someone could think it's necessary, when it's not. You usually drop it :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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In the later lessons they do drop the subject pronoun more often and the sentence should be accepted without it even now.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearyBeary

Can't u also use leer in this sentence cause its use it last time and now its leo

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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No, “leer” is the infinitive “to read” so there would have to be another verb conjugated before it. “ Leo” is “read” conjugated for “I”. Last time, was it Yo puede leer...” or “I can read...” ?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeannineMa281713

In English a professor is a teacher. It should be accepted either way.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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A professor is a teacher, but a teacher is not necessarily a professor. Professor = profesor

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bridget-river

A lion is a feline.

A cat is a feline.

A cat is not a lion.

Cat, lion, feline are related but not equal.

Same reasoning. Professor and teacher are related but not equal.

In the US there is a tremendous distinction between professor and teacher at the college/university levels. Any college teacher calling themselves a professor would rightfully be viewed with scorn.

EVEN if the educational achievements are the same. Even if you have earned a doctorate. You are hired as a teacher OR a professor. A teacher has less status.

(I'm a retired kindergarten teacher.)

1 month ago
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