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https://www.duolingo.com/Carlos_0701

"er" or "het"?

Carlos_0701
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There is a Dutch sentence I learned,

  • Ik hou er eigenlijk van.

And the English translation is:

  • I actually like it.

So here is my question. Does it mean "I actually like it there" or "I actually like IT"? Does it refer to someplace I like or something I like?

If it's the former then yeah I understand, but if it's the latter, why? Why not "Ik hou het eigenlijk van"?

Any help will be much appreciated.

3 months ago

2 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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It's something called pronominal adverbs. Basically it occurs when you have het, dit, dat plus a preposition.

http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=Pronouns.Ad02

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Markman96
Markman96
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It refers to someTHING you like.

Words that start with 'Er', 'daar', 'hier' and 'waar' and that are followed by a preposition or an adverb can be written separately or together.

You used the word 'ervan' in your sentence, but you separated it, which makes it a bit harder to spot (Ervan houden -> er eigenlijk van). 'Hetvan houden' simply does not exist, which answers your last question. The first question is harder to answer.

When 'er' is used in such a way, then the meaning depends on the following part ('-van', '-heen', '-naar', '-na'). In Dutch, you "Love 'of' something" and the 'of' is 'van'. The 'something' can be 'er' of 'het', but when it is used in a sentence with a 'er-daar-hier-waar word', then 'er' is always used and not 'het', even if it seems weird.

3 months ago