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"I like spring."

Translation:Me gusta la primavera.

5 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ADB1993
ADB1993
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Gusta is present tense and gustó is past.

Examples: Me gusta mi maestro (I like my teacher)

Me gustó mi maestro pero ahora pienso que él está loco. (I liked my teacher but now I think that he is crazy)

Hopefully that helps :) and if I am incorrect. I wouldnt mind someone fixing my statement lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyad.elbag

Gusta vs gusto?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Gusto is the first person conjugation, remember that in Spanish I is the indirect object and spring is the subject, so the verb must be conjugated according to it, that's why gusta is used. There's another way to use this verb where the person doing the liking is the subject and the thing being liked is the object, nevertheless it is used only on written Spanish, that would be yo gusto de la primavera.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cunningwigeon

Why is there an a mi

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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In everyday Spanish you will most likely hear me gusta, nevertheless gustar is one of the few verbs that actually needs and indirect object pronoun (me) and a prepositional pronoun (a mí) to be completely grammatical, without it, the sentence would be wrong, but, as I said before, usable in everyday Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Filius

Is "La primavera me gusta" also acceptable?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavmarx
Lavmarx
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Of course it can!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

nope

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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I've actually wondered this before. Spanish is typically flexible with its word arrangements. Couldn't the subject come before or after the object with little change in the meaning?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Filius

Mmkay. :D

But why not? Doesn't Spanish usually keep the subject before the verb?

5 years ago