"Esosseñoresinglesesnohablannuncaenespañol."

Translation:Those English gentlemen don't ever speak in Spanish.

5 months ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/esule
esule
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DL didn t like "never speak spanish"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wklem88

They should. Their original translation is very awkward sounding.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sylvia12664
sylvia12664
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They didn't again today

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jpschaaf
jpschaaf
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Yeah, it marked me wrong for this too. I reported it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andy16000

Today they did.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/damnfyne
damnfyne
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Not today 10/09/2018

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

DL Spanish didn't like "Englishmen"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HectorDesa6

Mine says I got it wrong because I wrote Englishmen instead of English men

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarianLips

don't ever and never are the same thing

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deb1134
Deb1134
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DL didn't like ...don't speak any Spanish" either.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankkeyser
frankkeyser
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"they don't speak any Spanish" = "ellos no hablan ningun espanol" or alternatively "ellos no hablan nada de espanol"

with respect to the missing accented characters

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sage2x
sage2x
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"They never speak Spanish" and "They don't ever speak Spanish" have identical meanings in English. Both answers should be correct.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mairibow

Surely it should say "hombres" not "Senores" for men

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Hombres = men

Señores = gentlemen (more formal and honorific)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bamdorf

Those englishmen don't speak any spanish (?) Or those english gentlemen don't speak any spanish. OR thos english gentlemen never speak any spanish. OR those english gentlemen never say anything in Spanish?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankJnlan
FrankJnlan
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How is this translation wrong, Duo? "Those English gentlemen never speak anything in Spanish"? 'Splain it to me, Lucy :P (I know it's not grammatically perfect, but most sentences here aren't)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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You have an "anything" (nada) in there that Duo doesn't.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankJnlan
FrankJnlan
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Nunca can mean 'anything' in certain cases, including this one.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankkeyser
frankkeyser
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http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/nunca

I don't think there are any circumstances in which "nunca" can mean "anything" or "nothing". It always means "never", or sometimes in situations such as this where it occurs as a double negative, it can also mean "ever". But Marcy is right.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankJnlan
FrankJnlan
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You can believe whatever you want, you’d still be wrong. I live in Mexico, I already speak Spanish.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hilary224783

I put the same. A couple of questions back ‘anything’ was nunca. (You never say anything ended with nunca - I put ‘you never say nothing’ as that was the literal translation but that was marked wrong too) There is a real lack of consistency in what is accepted between questions.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bamdorf

Well, if you give the translation of a spanish double negative as an English double negative then it will always be wrong. English doesn't use them, Spanish does.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/therabbit86ed

This sentence is poorly constructed, because you have a double negative:

Esos señores ingleses nunca hablan en español.

Those Englishmen never speak in Spanish.

Please be concise in order to be understood. Use proper grammar.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bishop6
Bishop6
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English avoids the double negative. Spanish actually requires what we could call a "double negative". That is, when you use a "negative" word such as "never", you have to put a "no" before the verb as well. The negatives have to "match" just like we match gender and number of adjectives to nouns.

"El no habla nunca conmigo" is correct Spanish for "He never talks to me".

Further, if you make a negative sentence in Spanish, every word in the sentence that can be negative, needs to be. So the English sentence "He never wants to talk to anybody" is in Spanish, "El no quiere hablar nunca con nadie". If you literally translate it word-for-word that says "He doesn't want to never talk with nobody". Which sounds HORRIBLE in English, but it's perfectly correct Spanish.

One small exception is that if you put a negative word like "nunca" right before the verb, it can replace the "no". So the above sentence could be "El nunca quiere hablar con nadie". Same if you use "nadie" or "nada" as the subject of the sentence: "Nada es importante" or "Nadie está aquí". But to rewrite those last two, you could say "No es importante nada" or "No hay nadie aquí" -- again, you need the "no" before the verb if you move the other negative word elsewhere.

I hope this helps, let me know!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fiona325448

Really helpful. Wish I could bookmark it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bamdorf

the double negative is quite normal and proper in Spanish, to the extent that sometimes if only a single negative is used it could be considered wrong.

2 weeks ago
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