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"¿Tú no quieres pan?"

Translation:Do you not want bread?

3 months ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/brc_B_brc

why did not the system accept my answer which was "don't you want bread" .

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rildyn
Rildyn
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"Don't you want bread" should be an acceptable translation. If it's marked wrong, report it.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbedalAmedal

this is wrong answer from the system it should be Do not you want bread

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rildyn
Rildyn
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Actually no... in English, when we ask the question, we would say "do you want bread?" When you put the negation "not'", it becomes "do you not want bread?"

But then if you instead used the contraction "don't", it would be "don't you want bread?"

Okay, slightly weird, I know, and maybe not what you would expect at first, but let's face it, sometimes the English language is a bit weird...

The difference between the first and second version is subtle, but in the first, I'm asking the question without any particular expectation of the answer "yes or no, do you want bread?"

The second version sort of implies that I thought you were going to want bread, and I'm surprised to find out that you don't. (So I kind of already know the expected answer.) Alternately, maybe I would use that form to ask for confirmation, when I see you don't have any bread and I thought you should have some.

The third version is somewhat similar to that alternate use of the second, but with less expectation of any particular answer. "I see you don't have bread right now. Don't you want bread?", i.e. "is the reason you don't have bread because you don't want it, or because you just didn't get it yet?"

Confused yet? :-) The point is that sentences in one language don't always translate word for word into another, and when there's more than one way to say something, the one you choose might depend on the context. In English we say "don't you" or "do you not", but never "do not you".

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacque783528

It did not say to put not there

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KNqrYl9P

The phrase, in terms of literally, translates to "Yo no want bread?" but to phrase it as a question we change the "no" to another negative word, "not" and change it so it's grammatically correct. Hope that helps!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandra336171

I put "No quieres pan" Why is this not correct.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MBKTruly

They asked for the English translation darlin'. You gave them more Spanish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MBKTruly

Their grammar translation into English is not the best here, nor in other examples. Don't worry, you're not the only they confuse at times.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillaume201712
Guillaume201712
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Don’t you like pan . Wrong ? ( I reported it)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissMunch

'pan' is Spanish. the rest of the sentence is in English. There's your mistake.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria696768
Maria696768
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Why don't you is wrong?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rildyn
Rildyn
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"Don't you want bread" should be an acceptable translation. If it's marked wrong, report it.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SXBdSqk4

I submitted "You don't want bread?" and was corrected to "You wouldn't like bread?" which sounds like the wording a British person might choose to convey the same intent. Sorry to say, I'm American (believe me, we'd rather have bread for president than Trump)

On this discussion page, the translation is currently "Do you not want bread?" which seems generally equivalent to "Don't you want bread?", so I'm not really sure why my answer was excluded.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rildyn
Rildyn
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In theory you're right, "you don't want bread?" should be an acceptable form when asked as a question, but you might have noticed they Duo seems to ignore punctuation. The form "you don't want bread" is taken as the statement of fact, i.e. I'm telling you that you don't want bread. The question form is usually phrased in Duo's answer bank with the inverted subject "don't you want bread" and similar variations.

4 weeks ago