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  5. "Sir, do you have two books?"

"Sir, do you have two books?"

Translation:Señor, ¿tiene usted dos libros?

June 6, 2018

62 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sumanyu5

Shouldn't it be , ¿Usted tiene dos libros? As we are tought that the pronoun comes before the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

It's allowed to switch verb and subject as a way to indicate it's a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHarr680954

is "Senor, tu tienes dos libros?" an acceptable alternative? Duolingo didn't accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goldensund

that's because senor is formal so you must use the respectful version of you which is usted. tu is used for close friends or informal addressing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryArndt1

Why is tienes dos libros not acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonWeidm

Tienes is informal and we are addressing someone formally therefore, we use tiene


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hagar565626

Why ( señor, tiene dos libros usted) does not working


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sumanyu5

Usted, is a pronoun . And pronouns are prefix to the verb en español


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zaragar

But the given correct answer is "tiene usted dos libros". Still pronoun after the verb...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John865911

I see the same thing... I wrote"usted tiene" and it was different from the duolingo answer but it was marked as correct. Duo lingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/feanorsilmarils

I also wrote "usted tiene" like John865911, but it was marked wrong. I see some explanations that it is "tiene usted...", because it is a question, but it would seem that the tone of voice would suffice as well, using "usted tiene" If a question with a pronoun subject isn't written, you could not tell it was a question except for intonation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

Or rather, pronouns are attached to the verb. In normal order they come immediately before the verb, but in switched order, like when used for a question, they come immediately after the verb.

In Hagar's example, "dos libros" has been inserted between the verb and the pronoun, thus it's not a correctly formulated question in Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimiSedore

tiene dos libros is aceptable y has been up until now. if you are going to place a personal pronoun at us at least explain this new add-on before we are charged with failing it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elijah824419

I thought it would be accepted too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dlbraly

Got it: formal = usted, informal = tu. Thanks for the comments, glad im not the only one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rick727345

Why not, "Señor, ¿tienes dos libros?" Because "Sir" indicates formal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonWeidm

Yes, señor is formal and so we use tiene instead of tienes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Bubba-

Yes, it is formal. This means that you need to use the formal "usted tiene" instead of "tienes" (use the third person form with usted).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hootspa

"posee"? We haven't learned this word. why is it popping up in the answer and why is tiene missing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/irena704294

When we write "el señor" and only Señor. I am from Poland and it is problem for me. Thank you for answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

Spanish and English both are languages that use articles: - I met a man and I asked the man: "Man, where do you live?" - Conocí a un hombre y yo pregunte el hombre: "Hombre, ¿dónde vives?"

  • "a man" / "un hombre" uses an indefinite article "a" / "un", to indicate that we're not talking about something specific.
  • "the man" / "el hombre" uses a definite article "the" / "el", to indicate that we know whom we are talking about. (It's the man I mentioned before.)
  • "Man" / "Hombre" is a form of address, where we no longer talk about someone, but rather we talk to him.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hootspa

Um, mine is saying that Señor, ¿posee dos libros? is correct. We have not learned the word posee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

Poseer is something like English possess.

It's no surprise that the alternatives will sometimes give words we didn't learn, as the alternatives are contributed by students, who report that their alternative should be accepted as well. Thus, they tend to include words we haven't (yet) learned but which would indeed be acceptable in the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe110046

Why isn't usted tienes correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonWeidm

Usted is formal and tienes is informal.

Usted --> tiene Tú --> tienes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julio404727

Why not tienes. It is accepted in other exercises.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

Because "tienes" is for you informal. Here, Duolingo addresses someone as "Sir", which it does to indicate this is not someone you are familiar with. Hence, you need the verb form for you formal: Tiene.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaheshJaya6

Tell us the difference between ¿tienes and ¿tiene usted..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

"?tienes" is "do you (that I know personally) have ..."; "?tiene" is "do you (who are a stranger to me) have ...". Thus, to use "usted", which is formal, you always need "tiene".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kasturi183582

Why not el señor now?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

When you're directly addressing him, it's simply "señor".
When you're talking about him to someone else, it's "el señor".

Think of it this way:

"Please, Judge, don't send me to jail"
vs
"The judge was lenient with me."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sumanyu5

I've been out of touch of linguistics for a while, but I'll point out that ' el señor ' is used when when sir is being talked about and is used in the middle of the sentence ( to put it simple ). And ' señor ' here is used as he is directly being talked to and the speaker sounds to be exclaimed ( ofcourse it is in the beginning of the sentence ). This isn't the exact and correct explanation, but might help you get what I'm trying to say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michellema947720

Why does "usted" cannot be written in the end of the sentance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

Because it has to be next to the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anna540958

And people said Spanish was easy to learn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosGaviari

Could someone explain to me when and when not to use ''usted'' and how you need ti use it ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

The word "usted" is similar to "you" in English. It's more formal, though. Duolingo uses "madam" or "sir" to indicate formal. Likewise, the teacher is "usted", as is the post man, etc. On the other hand, in this day and age your little sister and little brother are probably both addressed as "tú", and your older siblings as well, and the other kids in the same class, etc.

Of course, in Spanish you don't actually have to use the pronoun, but though the pronoun can be left out, the verb is always conjugated. Where you could say "Tú tienes un libro.", you can instead say "Tienes un libro.". Because "tienes" is still conjugated as it's done for "tú", it's still clear that you're addressing that person as "tú": informal. The same holds for "usted" and "tiene". You could say "Usted tiene un libro." or "Tiene un libro.", and because you're using "tiene" in both cases, it's still clear that you're addressing a stranger: formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardHop80131

Why isn't "Señor, tiene dos libros?" correct as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

The sentence doesn't start with a leading question mark. If, after indicating whom you're addressing, you would insert "¿", then the sentence would seem fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SurajSapra1

What's wrong with ' ¿Señor, tienes dos libros?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

Because if you address him as "señor", that means you address him with the polite "usted", not the familiar "tu". And "usted" has all of the same grammar as "él".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardHop80131

Thanks Rae.F. Appears that the use of usted and tu is the same as Sie (formal) and du (informal) in German. I am not aware of any special "you" distinctions in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

Not anymore, but once upon a time "thou" was the singular familiar and "you" was the plural or the polite. "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" Also "prithee" was literally "pray thee" or "ask you".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

We usually say that Spanish has leading question marks at the start of the sentence. But to be more precise, it has that leading question mark at the start of the question. Thus, if your sentence starts with an address, the leading question mark only comes after that: Tú que lees esto: lo entiendes? (You who read this: do you understand?)

Then, once you know where the question starts, and recognising there's a formal address before that, "Señor", you'll recognise that the actual start of the question will need "tiene", being the formal third person singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elhombre862023

I thought you could use tienes in place of tiene usted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

If you address someone as "sir", if you're not on a first-name basis with them, you need to use the "usted" form, not the "tú" form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickHarnes

Duo is inconsistent with the formal and informal. Very confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

No, they are very consistent. Any sentence with sir, ma'am, señor, or señora will be formal. Any sentence with a first name is informal. If no hint is given, either is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris295603

I had "senor tienes usted dos libros" and was wrong. I thought that tienes was used when talking to the person? Can someone help explain this to me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

"Tienes" is the informal "tú" conjugation. The polite "usted" takes all of the same grammar as "él/ella", because it derives from "vuestra merced", or "your mercy".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruj831497

El senor usted tiene dos libros should be an accepted answer corrct? it was not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

It's only "el" señor in the third person, never in the second person. When you address someone, their name is not the subject of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

It should not be an accepted answer for lacking the question marks. It's a bit of a curious structure, as you are addressing "El señor", meaning you're talking about him, rather than addressing him. But even then, at the point where you stop addressing and start the actual question, you need the leading question mark (and at the end the trailing one). El señor, ¿usted tiene dos libros?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

The correction algorithm does not look at punctuation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_iniaN_

Why is it wrong to write Señor¿Tu tienes dos libros?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael644215

I have missed this 4 times you keep switching from tiene to tienes it a catch 23


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

The expression is "Catch-22". It's the name of a book about soldiers who don't want to be fighting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael644215

When i miss an answer i write it down so i do not make the same mistakes twice with you the rule is tienes or is it changed here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

It's "tienes" when you're on a first-name basis with someone and call them "tú".
It's "tiene" when you're not on a first-name basis with someone and call them "usted".

Since we're addressing this person as "Sir/Señor", we're not on a first-name basis with him. Therefore he's "usted" and we need "tiene".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindseyPet315323

How to know when to use el senor vs senor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2563

It's a matter of whether you're addressing him directly (talking to him) vs talking about him.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/27556014?comment_id=42700705

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