"Mispadresquierenvisitardiferentespueblos."

Translation:My parents want to visit different towns.

7 months ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Gholets
Gholets
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¿Por qué no es, visitar pueblos diferentes?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KennethBon20

From what I can tell, "mis padres quieren visitar pueblos differentes" would be closer to "... to visit towns which are different/unique" and "mis padres quieren visitar differentes pueblos" is closer to a disagreement over which town to visit "each of my parents wants to visit a different town"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBell0

Sorry, you have lost me on this one. I was taught that there was no word for town in Spanish? Ciudad = City. Pueblo = Village. In Spain there seems to be no word in-between which is quite frustrating so if you know of one please let me know.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Ciudad = city. Pueblo = town. Aldea = village.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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Ah, thank you, KennethBon! I have been trying to figure out why DL would not accept "My parents want to visit various towns." Now, I understand Duo is thinking more like "My parents do not want to visit the same towns."

EDIT: A month later, I now think the above is backwards. I now believe "Mis padres quieren visitar diferentes pueblos" would mean "My parents want to visit various towns" and "Mis padres quieren visitar pueblos diferentes" would mean "My parents want to visit unusual towns" OR imply that they disagree about which towns to visit.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

There must be some rule to when the adj. follows the noun and when it is in front. That would be nice to know.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sisi_rider
Sisi_rider
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I saw this explanation which might help https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/adjective-placement

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna260159

it's a very clear explaination, gracias!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cynthewise

thank you for sharing, this helped a lot!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JagoJory

Before noun it means something like 'various' - my parents want to visit a variety of towns. After noun it may carry the meaning that there is a disagreement.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martina980671

I wrote VARIOUS and duo did not take it : / (

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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Did you report it?

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martina980671

Yes I did

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AKyper
AKyper
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I'm not certain, but maybe it's not a direct enough translation. Google's spanish-english translator puts 'various' to 'varios'. I also totally get what you're saying by using 'various' for 'different' but maybe Duo was meaning something more along the lines of 'different towns (from each other).

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esteban15084

Why do we not say visitar a differentes pueblos here? Is the a not necessary for the unconjugated form visitar?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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You only need the a when you're visiting people---it's that Spanish personal a, not used when visiting places.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Mi padre gusta Guadalajara, mi madre Oaxaca.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToujoursNikki
ToujoursNikki
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A ti padre se gusta Guadalajara a ti Madre se gusta Oaxaca.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Very close! A mi padre le gusta Guadalajara, y a mi madre, Oaxaca.

Se gusta means is pleasing: Se gusta la primavera aquí.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMon385640

Excellent!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puSmbjB6

can only adjectives ending in "e/es" go before the noun or can all adjectives go before the noun?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Nope, many "ordinary" adjectives can precede the noun. Examples: blanca nieve and nieve amarilla. An adjective before a noun often takes on an intrinsic, almost poetic quality: "The white snow glistened in the morning sun". Whereas after a noun, it suggests a more restrictive, specific instance: "Children should be told not to eat yellow snow." Another classic example: Nueva York.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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There are a handful of categories of adjectives that you can regularly find in front of the noun. These are skilfully abbreviated with BANGS:

  • beauty - bonito, feo, hermoso...
  • age - joven, viejo, nuevo...
  • number - dos, mucho, tercero...
  • goodness - bueno, malo, mediocre...
  • size - grande, pequeño, alto...
2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AKNamahoe

I misspelled quieren but the whole sentence was correct and still got it wrong, usually it just says you have a typo

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It depends on how you misspelt it. If you accidentally spell a different valid word, Duo will mark it as an error.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdrewy
jdrewy
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why is differentes in front of pueblos?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The phrase has different meanings depending on the position of the adjective:

  • diferentes pueblos - various towns (They want to visit many places)
  • pueblos diferentes - different towns (They can't agree where to go)
2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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Hi, Ryagon! I did check out the resources listed on google. Most don't really deal with "diferente" and those that do agree with you. But, there's another possible meaning of "diferente": unique or unusual. Do you think "various" would cover that as well as many places?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You mean it as in "different from the norm" instead of "different from each other", right? I'm pretty certain that would file in with "pueblos diferentes", but it's surprisingly hard to look up, since English doesn't make a big difference there either. But if you use diferente with a singular noun (as you can do with "different from the norm"), you will find the adjective exclusively after the noun.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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Interesting and unfortunate--it would be easier to remember that different from the norm is similar to various. Guess I'll have to try as a semi-rule that diferentes almost always follows the noun, unless the English is various or a synonym. Of course, I tried "My parents want to visit various places," in DL's statement and it wasn't accepted!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AKyper
AKyper
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What about unusual, or strange towns? Does spanish use the word different like this?

*Just saw my question was already answered!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BramPieter95

Why would "my parents want to visit VARIOUS towns" not be accepted?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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No particular reason for that. It's a fine translation.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chuckdumas

various has its own name 'varios'. 'diferente' is a valid synonym for 'varios' but 'varios' is not a (listed) synonym for diferente.

But mostly the owl used 'diferente' - why cause yourself problems, translate what is there.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beth672216

Does anyone know why i cant see my answer? Its hidden by the green box.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AKyper
AKyper
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Try left clicking and dragging the box away from your answer-if you're on a computer. If you're on a phone, you should be able to just press down on it and drag it away.

3 weeks ago
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