Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Mis padres quieren visitar diferentes pueblos."

Translation:My parents want to visit different towns.

3 months ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Gholets
Gholets
  • 25
  • 250

¿Por qué no es, visitar pueblos diferentes?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KennethBon20

From what I can tell, "mis padres quieren visitar pueblos differentes" would be closer to "... to visit towns which are different/unique" and "mis padres quieren visitar differentes pueblos" is closer to a disagreement over which town to visit "each of my parents wants to visit a different town"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

There must be some rule to when the adj. follows the noun and when it is in front. That would be nice to know.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sisi_rider

I saw this explanation which might help https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/adjective-placement

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JagoJory

Before noun it means something like 'various' - my parents want to visit a variety of towns. After noun it may carry the meaning that there is a disagreement.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esteban15084

Why do we not say visitar a differentes pueblos here? Is the a not necessary for the unconjugated form visitar?

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
  • 25
  • 25
  • 990

You only need the a when you're visiting people---it's that Spanish personal a, not used when visiting places.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
  • 25
  • 1200

Mi padre gusta Guadalajara, mi madre Oaxaca.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToujoursNikki
ToujoursNikki
  • 25
  • 18
  • 18
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8

A ti padre se gusta Guadalajara a ti Madre se gusta Oaxaca.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
  • 25
  • 25
  • 990

Very close! A mi padre le gusta Guadalajara, y a mi madre, Oaxaca.

Se gusta means is pleasing: Se gusta la primavera aquí.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMon385640

Excellent!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puSmbjB6

can only adjectives ending in "e/es" go before the noun or can all adjectives go before the noun?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
  • 25
  • 25
  • 990

Nope, many "ordinary" adjectives can precede the noun. Examples: blanca nieve and nieve amarilla. An adjective before a noun often takes on an intrinsic, almost poetic quality: "The white snow glistened in the morning sun". Whereas after a noun, it suggests a more restrictive, specific instance: "Children should be told not to eat yellow snow." Another classic example: Nueva York.

2 weeks ago