"Mis padres quieren visitar diferentes pueblos."

Translation:My parents want to visit different towns.

5 months ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Gholets
Gholets
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¿Por qué no es, visitar pueblos diferentes?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KennethBon20

From what I can tell, "mis padres quieren visitar pueblos differentes" would be closer to "... to visit towns which are different/unique" and "mis padres quieren visitar differentes pueblos" is closer to a disagreement over which town to visit "each of my parents wants to visit a different town"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBell0

Sorry, you have lost me on this one. I was taught that there was no word for town in Spanish? Ciudad = City. Pueblo = Village. In Spain there seems to be no word in-between which is quite frustrating so if you know of one please let me know.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Ciudad = city. Pueblo = town. Aldea = village.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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Ah, thank you, KennethBon! I have been trying to figure out why DL would not accept "My parents want to visit various towns." Now, I understand Duo is thinking more like "My parents do not want to visit the same towns."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToujoursNikki
ToujoursNikki
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Because the adjective follows the noun in Spanish

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EseEmeErre
EseEmeErre
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This is true only generally. Some adjectives, diferente(s) being one, take on a different meaning depending on whether they're placed before or after the noun.

This can help you get started with learning more:

https://www.google.com/search?q=spanish+adjectives+that+change+meaning+with+placement

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Slagar1
Slagar1
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Exactly. "Pueblos" is the noun and "diferentes" is the adjective, so this sentence is going against the typically rule of Spanish. All you did was state the obvious.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria415107

Yes but why is diferentes before pueblo?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria415107

pueblos*

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

There must be some rule to when the adj. follows the noun and when it is in front. That would be nice to know.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sisi_rider
Sisi_rider
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I saw this explanation which might help https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/adjective-placement

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna260159

it's a very clear explaination, gracias!

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JagoJory

Before noun it means something like 'various' - my parents want to visit a variety of towns. After noun it may carry the meaning that there is a disagreement.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esteban15084

Why do we not say visitar a differentes pueblos here? Is the a not necessary for the unconjugated form visitar?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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You only need the a when you're visiting people---it's that Spanish personal a, not used when visiting places.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Mi padre gusta Guadalajara, mi madre Oaxaca.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToujoursNikki
ToujoursNikki
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A ti padre se gusta Guadalajara a ti Madre se gusta Oaxaca.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Very close! A mi padre le gusta Guadalajara, y a mi madre, Oaxaca.

Se gusta means is pleasing: Se gusta la primavera aquí.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMon385640

Excellent!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puSmbjB6

can only adjectives ending in "e/es" go before the noun or can all adjectives go before the noun?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Nope, many "ordinary" adjectives can precede the noun. Examples: blanca nieve and nieve amarilla. An adjective before a noun often takes on an intrinsic, almost poetic quality: "The white snow glistened in the morning sun". Whereas after a noun, it suggests a more restrictive, specific instance: "Children should be told not to eat yellow snow." Another classic example: Nueva York.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AKNamahoe
AKNamahoe
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I misspelled quieren but the whole sentence was correct and still got it wrong, usually it just says you have a typo

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdrewy
jdrewy
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why is differentes in front of pueblos?

1 week ago
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