"Demasiadoelegante."

Translation:Too elegant.

6 months ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Devin902182

So my question is, is this a positive stayment like in English when someone says, "Too cute!!" Or are they telling you to go try on something else because it is too elegant for an occasion?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonanLaugh

This translation is for the second option: it's too elegant for something.

If you want to say "Too" the first way you described, you can use "Que." It looks like "Qué," but it doesn't have the "é" and therefore means something else.

For example: "Too cute!" becomes: "¡Que elegante!" Which is really saying: "How cute!"

Hopefully this clears it up a bit.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pye20
pye20
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de + mas + iado [ · mas from Latin magis “more” · ]
[ · cognate with magnum · https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/magnus#Latin · ] [ · Etymologies: https://books.google.com/books?isbn=149319111X · https://books.google.com/books?isbn=1514452995 · ]

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TannerDavi19

I've personally never found a good reason or timr to say anything like this. Its just a mattee of learning how to use the word "demasiado"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynne650325

Hey, that was going to be my question! ;-)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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In the U.S., we might colloquially say something is "too fancy" for an occasion. Could that also be a translation for "demasiado elegante"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OrrinOther

Sometimes fancy and elegant are very different though. For example, an elegant solution to a problem might be something subtle or simple, not fancy.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Yes, I agree. Elegant clothes are usually tasteful and simple, and fancy can mean bright, flashy, fussy or "loud" (just off the top of my head mind you, didn't consult a dictionary or anything).

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ExSquaredOver2
ExSquaredOver2
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You know, all I know about fashion I learnt from Duolingo. I'm a clueless teenage boy.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

I'll take that as a compliment then.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suparna478905

Doesn't también also mean too? How many words are there for "too" in Spanish?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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too has two unrelated meanings (that I can think of) in English: also and to an excessive degree. Spanish has different words for these two meanings.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynne650325

But we also use 'too' for emphasis (see Devin902102), in place of 'very'. If we are talking about clothes, 'too cute' could mean either excessively cute (as in inappropriate for a funeral) or very, very cute (say a baby picture).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

"Too cute" is like "so cute" then. I think it's too faddy a definition to be accepted. Or only used in certain circles, not said in general.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/21deen
21deen
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To add to Sara's explanation, 1. Too (too much)- demasiado e.g Es demasiado tarde - It is too late! 2. Too (also)- tambien/tampoco e.g Estoy cansado. Yo tambien!/No me voy. Yo tampoco! - I'm tired. Me too!/I'm not leaving. Me neither (or me too)!

No accents on my keys, but hope this helps!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OrrinOther

What is the difference between "too elegant" (accepted by DL) and "too much elegance", which is not accepted. Is it just that elegance is a noun? Don't the two answers mean basically the same thing?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

I would say that is exactly the difference, with too much elegance being "demasiada de elegancia".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/21deen
21deen
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Based on my little knowledge...

"Is it just that elegance is a noun?" Yes, and the fact the two are constructed differently.

"Don't the two answers mean basically the same thing?" I think the two convey different meanings and are used differently.

P.S, demasiado elegante: too elegant- adverb/adjective. demasiado de elegancia: too much (of) elegance- adverb/adjective/noun.

Hope this helps!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andras_Gyep
Andras_Gyep
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21deen very nice answer btw, the only thing is that the proper way is "demasiada elegancia" not "demasiado de elegancia" the word "de" is simply not used here because elegancia is a noun in this phrase.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyAnne723649

Can this be used idiomatically as a compliment or would that be que elegante (or something similar)?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linsumcd

Too much elegance marked wrong reported. If it is too elegant why not use Muy?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scar53433
scar53433
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Because 'muy' is used to say that something has a lot of a quality/object, but on the other hand 'demasiado' has an excess of that same quality/object.

Hope that one helps.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alice79733

Extremely fancy... or no?​

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

No. Too chic for the occasion.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdonisCham1

Oh, like my style?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

I know how it is, sometimes we can look just too good!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeKoos1

Duo, add "exceedingly" to your vocabulary.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Nice, but no thanks.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alonso127755

❤❤❤❤ you peaple you are ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ losers You ❤❤❤❤ drunk biches

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BettyVanV.

Too elegant

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/turtle4christ

I spoke into the microphone and my voice didn't even pick up. Happen to anybody else???

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas441523

Way is the difference between to and too

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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There are three words in English that are pronounced the same: to, too, and two.

To is a preposition and expresses direction toward.

"I'm going to school"

Too is an adverb that has two meanings. It can mean "in addition", like also. It can also mean "to an excessive degree" as Sara said above.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J...Monroe17

This woman needs to speak a little more clear. Sounds like she is saying, ,Tu cerrado elegante.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArtOfFHP

A bit disappointed that "Much too elegant" isn't accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

The meaning is the same for sure.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goldenrose2468

In what coversation does this sentance come up??

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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Why would that be relevant? Most of Duolingo's sentences are bizarre. That's part of what makes it amusing.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyAnne723649

Agree that Duolingo is a great free resource...and also think context might help with the learning. Several of us have asked if this is contextually a compliment (oh la la! You are too elegant tonight!) or if this is a suggestion to go change (Your ball gown is not appropriate for the PTA luncheon at McDonalds. Too elegant.). ;-)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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I think it could be either, with the right context.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PBradley1

I'm gonna do it..... You're getting paid for that one!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andras_Gyep
Andras_Gyep
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Maybe you just showed up wearign a tux in a BBQ party ... :P

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Catherine805408

very elegant should also be correct

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thebestone13

No, it shouldn't. 'Very elegant' is 'muy elegante', as 'very' and 'too' have different meaning

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

I agree, but I have noticed here that, on the other hand, "muy" has been used to mean "too" (meaning too much and not also). It's confusing.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andras_Gyep
Andras_Gyep
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I think of them as i do with "so" and "too"

So elegant = Tan elegante

Very elegant = Muy elegante

Too elegant = Demasiado elegante

In "too" and "demasiado" you just reached a limit and maybe surpassed it, while with "so", "very" "tan" and "muy" you haven't yet.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iztok225878

To is writtwen with one 'o' in English! Too elegant doesen't mean anything

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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There are three words in English that are pronounced the same: to, too, and two.

To is a preposition and expresses direction toward.

"I'm going to school"

Too is an adverb that has two meanings. It can mean "in addition", like also. It can also mean "to an excessive degree" as Sara said above.

In this sentence, too is the correct word. The dress is too elegant for a barbecue. "To elegant" doesn't make any sense in English, since elegant is an adjective and it really can't be a destination to go to. If you add another word, like "I'm going to elegant parties this month," it might work, but feel very forced to me.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caleb169

too means too much of something

5 months ago
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