Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"¿Quieres queso en tu pescado?"

Translation:Do you want cheese on your fish?

2 months ago

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Furbolg

Do you want ketchup on your fruit bowl?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmkrator

Yes please.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diane72505

:)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/8lSfpXOm

Is this a Spanish course designed for people from Wisconsin?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tim678378

I actually had fish with cheese on it in Lazaro Cardenas, Michoacán 2 weeks ago. It was, surprisingly, pretty good. I thought of this question when my friend ordered it.

19 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaHule1

Would you like mayonnaise on your chocolate cake

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redsassafras

Google "chocolate mayonnaise cake" sometime. (And find another case for the "en = in or on" conversation in the process.)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samuel98262

Uhh... no.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_scott
Seattle_scottPlus
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 21
  • 9
  • 3
  • 183

I want cheese IN my fish. On my fish? With my fish?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

i agree, they usually say in your fish or in your dish as a way to describe something that needs to be added

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.k.a.t.i.e.

I don't think a verbal answer is necessary in any language in this situation. Gag face.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jon235428
Jon235428
  • 19
  • 11
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2
  • 159

No, absolutamente no! Queso y pescado? Unicamente en emperedados!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mph.vgc
mph.vgc
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 708

I want cheese IN my fish!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackMcslay
JackMcslay
  • 22
  • 17
  • 16
  • 16
  • 12
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 60

"in your fish" should be accepted, you definitively can put stuff inside fishes

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmkrator

I don't think anyone here has argued that you can't physically put cheese in fish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimnice
jimnicePlus
  • 25
  • 25
  • 19
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1458

Don't be so quick to judge here. I enjoy a pizza with anchovies as I expect some others do. So the correct answer to this question is: "only if it's mozzarella".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArpsTnd

I put "in", ugh, how to know if it is "in", "on" or "at" if it is only "en" in Spanish -_-

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cruzah

I want to know this was well

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanWitham1
IanWitham1
  • 25
  • 24
  • 24
  • 18
  • 15
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 604

Me gusta pescado con papas y queso.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cruzah

how can we differentiate "in" and "on" in spanish?

la carta está en la caja - the letter is on the box

la carta está en la caja - the letter is in the box

I think that context wouldn't even help in such cases.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yashanna1

Yuck

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArpsTnd

Made me remember this commercial

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skfarouk

Eww.... Reminds me of fillet o fish from mcdonalds

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasBerg18

the option 'your' was not available among the various word choices

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sparkle1027

Will this crazy man please stop trying to feed my fish cheese!!! My fish does not like your cheese.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tianara1

Boo! I want cheese IN my fish!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gertjan592355

Ugh no

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/serebrem

"With your fish" sounds correct for me

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WCGB
WCGB
  • 25
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 89

Why not in your fish????

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlofSanner
OlofSanner
  • 25
  • 11
  • 6
  • 30

Cheezuz that's fishy !!!

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlQuzMar
AlQuzMar
  • 15
  • 11
  • 7
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

I just can't make up my mind if I want the cheese in or on my fish.

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rebekah772431

Do you want / would you like?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alina509395

In your fish. Sick of losing points even if I'm right.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmkrator

It definitely seems like "in" should work here, but if I were you, I wouldn't assume that I'm right.

You definitely could be (I think you probably are), but just because "en" can usually be translated as "in" does not mean it always can.

There is also the possibility that Duo will accept "in" here, but you had some other typo and Duo corrected you poorly. That does happen.

Tl;dr: You're here to learn Spanish. So am I. I wouldn't presume I know Spanish better than the teacher unless I had some evidence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alina509395

No, there was the only issue with what I wrote. Unlike you I tend to question even what my teachers tell me. If you are willing to accept whatever people tell you I'm okay with it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmkrator

I never said don't question them or what they say. I just said don't presume to know more than them. (If you recall, I even mentioned that I suspected you are correct.) Even if you in fact do know more than them, assuming you do from the beginning will not help you at all.

And I'm not sure how you can be confident you had no other errors, but if that's the case, then I return to the previous. Perhaps it simply shouldn't be translated as "in". Why are you so confident it can be? Once again, I suspect you are probably right. But being so sure about it without having evidence to support it is detrimental to learning.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alina509395

I don't always assume I'm right, in fact I question my own opinion just like anyone else's (that's called critical thinking). But in this case, as I said, there's no clear context. Japanese people eat fish stuffed with cheese. I live in Japan. I, as I said, assumed due to the lack of context that it's the case. Nevertheless, I'd prefer if you weren't questioning my motives since you are not an acquaintance of mine. If you're giving me some advise even if you don't know me, I'll tell you this. Don't always assume that other people assume they're right.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmkrator

Ok, then.

Point 1: I'm not assuming, or questioning your motives. You said it yourself. "Sick of losing points even if I'm right."

Point 2: There is no clear context. But there may be cultural context. That exists in language, as I pointed out.

Point 3: What does knowing someone have to do with giving advise? There's no connection. But since you've made it clear you don't want it, I'll stop trying.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alina509395

As for cultural context, I told you that in Japan fish stuffed with cheese is quite common. And then you say, don't always assume you're right. I don't do so. You're advising me on things you're not aware of.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alina509395

Dude I don't see your point. There are ambiguous sentences in any language. And if the sentence is ambiguous like in this case (we have no picture of the fish, we don't see the cheese) we can only assume what are we given. Since both in and on are correct, then both versions should be accepted. That's what I say.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmkrator

I'm just saying that we don't know that this is ambiguous. If for no other reason than the fact that it could be cultural convention dictating what it means. Sort of like "what's up" never actually means "what is up from here" even though it might technically be allowed to mean that strictly word wise. Would you think Duo should accept "Qué es arriba" as a translation for "What's up?"

But all of that said, the point was always that you shouldn't approach it assuming you are right.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alina509395

Yes, because you know that "en" can be both "in" and "on". Both versions, "cheese in fish", "cheese on fish" are correct. If they're both correct, then my version is too. If it is, then I'm right. I'm not saying that "cheese on fish" is wrong. They are both correct.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MellieLN
MellieLN
  • 25
  • 2
  • 554

I asked my husband (a native Spanish speaker) about this. He said that "en" sounds like in, but it's almost never used as "in" (the one example he could come up with is "en la casa", which does mean in the house). So en = on is the rule, with en = in the exception and not the rule. Also, I LOVE Japan and have been several times. The only cheese stuffed fish I've encountered there is taiyaki. Delicious, but a unique case.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathanbost
jonathanbost
  • 25
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 688

The sentence could literally be translated "cheese in your fish," but that makes no sense; maybe they do that in Japan, but they definitely don't do it in Spanish or English countries, and those are the two languages we're using/learning, so your point about "cultural context" in Japan is moot. From a purely literal translation, you're right; it could be "in." But what makes more sense is "on."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alina509395

Jonathan, that's my point. Grammatically my translation is fine. If I say: "El teléfono está en el bolso", you will most likely translate is as "The phone is in the bag". But it can totally be "The phone is on the bag". Probability isn't that high, but it is possible. Same with this example. Last time I checked, this app tests your language knowledge which includes vocabulary pronunciation and grammar, not your cultural knowledge. As I said, if there were some contextual details, I wouldn't say anything. There aren't? The phone is on the bag, the cheese is in the fish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alina509395

Because "en" can be translated as both "in" and "on". I don't know what does this sentence mean without the context, maybe this person likes eating fish with cheese inside it? I've seen so many bizarre foods by now I won't be amazed. No context - I translate what I see.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kosmkrator

Like I said before, just because it can usually be translated one way does not mean it always can.

For example, "por" can often be translated as "for", but sometimes must be translated as "by".

1 month ago