"Señora, esta chaqueta es suya."

Translation:Ma'am, this jacket is yours.

5 months ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/trevorcraig

Have to say I'm with GrzechooP, Senora is Madam, Senorita is Miss

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack872103

How do i know if speaker meant, Ma'am this jacket is hers? As in the other woman's.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chuckdumas

You don't unless the speaker helps you with additional infromation. I used 'hers' and it was accepted 27 Sep 18

The forms su, sus, suyo(a), suyos(as) have multiple meanings. This means that one cannot distinguish except by context between his book, hers, yours or theirs. http://www.bowdoin.edu/hispanic-studies/tools/newgr/ats/24.htm

Ambiguous Suyo

Suyo and the related forms can be ambiguous, since they can mean "his," "hers," "yours," "theirs," or "its." https://www.thoughtco.com/possessive-pronouns-spanish-3079364

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel825557

How are you supposed to know when to use suya vs suyas vs suyo vs suyos?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FelixParso

Why is this esta rather than este?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmineHadji1
AmineHadji1
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Because chaqueta = jacket is feminine

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzechooP
GrzechooP
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:D
so you say... Care to explain what gives you that idea?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bread412975

Is it just me or does the text to speech voice sound mildly irritated with this one

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alice48202

Boy (and that is an interjection, not to be mistaken as sexist etc ), the comments here are scary. My question is : Why is "This is your jacket" not acceptable, since we are often using different syntax and inflections?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bishop6
Bishop6
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Because that would be "Esta es su chaqueta".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SonjiaED

I said "Lady, this jacket is yours". I would think that you could use Lady for Senora... thoughts?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adriano732737

This is an interesting discussion centered on the use by DL of "Ma´am" in English. For what is is worth, me being UK British, i personally am sick of seeing / reading "Ma´am" . In the UK i think only the police force use "Ma´am" and that is when addressing a female colleague of higher rank! Usually "Madam" is used in an ironic, sardonic or condescending manner. "Mrs" is often used as in "Hey Mrs (or miss), is this jacket yours?" see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-fH-Y-Hy7E from https://www.butterflyspanish.com/ for an entertaining insight into how "Señora" is used in Spanish speaking countries.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EstabanPay

The tips say "suyo" can be used for male or female, but when i answer, "Señora, esta chaqueta es suyo" it is marked wrong! So which is in error, the tip or answer checking?

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blibby0

Miss is perfectly good translation of senora in English English!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzechooP
GrzechooP
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:(
...actually, MISS is quite wrong, since SENORA is rather equivalent of Mrs. in any English. If you meant MRS (pronounced myzz) - it would be far from perfect too, since in English English this is placed before last name of a (married) woman. Sort of like dr., mr, and so on.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blibby0

No, you are wrong!!! It is perfectly fine!!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzechooP
GrzechooP
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It is, you say...
Care to explain why?
:D

MISS in its broadest meaning describes a YOUNG woman when SENORA - also in its very liberal application - means ANY (but usually at least GROWN UP) woman.
See the difference? Imagine yourself addressing a 60 years old widow: MISS.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blibby0

In a shop if an assistant were to address you and you were a woman they may ask 'can i help you with anything there Miss?' this is very common regardless of age. At least where i come from. So in this instance to me 'Senora' y 'Miss' have exactly the same connotation!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzechooP
GrzechooP
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blibby0, I gave you a few arguments ad meritum, and not a single one ad personam, so it seems that further discussion doesn't make much sense.

PS - check the definition of a troll (the internet one) and then think about which one of the two of us fits better.
:D

regards and good luck

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzechooP
GrzechooP
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sorry, wrong again.

    • I'm afraid you've misheard or didn't catch the subtle difference between Ms (myzz) - which is quite common form of addressing any woman regardless of age and marital status - and Miss.
      Or perhaps you're referring to some local manner of addressing female customers in whatever store you heard it. In the Southern states there was often popular form of calling some local celebrities (most often married women) "Missy" - but that was long ago, doubt if still in use... In any case, that still doesn't make it - as you called it - English English.
    • the sentence you're translating is ONLY what it is: "Señora, esta chaqueta es suya."
      It isn't a part of any scenario or any particular situation in a store or wherever else, and there is no "senorita" - there is "senora". So just check it in a dictionary or/and check the actual meaning of "miss" in a vocabulary.
      Otherwise you may find yourself in a situation when your "miss" translation will become a serious miss (like in 'missing the point').
3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blibby0

Grzechoop, I come from Central England where i am quite sure real English English is spoken and i can assure you that i am quite correct! I have misheard nothing and there is no mistake. I can only asume that you are the new Duolingo troll!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzechooP
GrzechooP
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I don't have anything against that sentence in any language, but can i please have some other option instead of this split in two halves ma'am? There are two (at least) less rural US/ghetto sounding possibilities: lady or madam (the latter being more common in Canada) - maybe I'm too picky, but i would really appreciate less... hmmmm.... well, less vulgar translation. P.S. Excuse my boldness all who disagree with my sentiment. :D

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I agree that there should be alternatives. In some cases, lady or madam have been accepted. If you find a sentence in which they are not, you can report it.

However, "less rural US/ghetto sounding" is very rude. Given your manner of expressing yourself, I found it rather ironic that you wish for choices that are less "vulgar."

Also, one definition of madam in the US is a woman who runs a bordello.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzechooP
GrzechooP
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?!...
well, RUDE... That's strong.
But, what exactly is rude here? Is it the fact, that rural US full of people using their local version of English exists? Just travel across the country from and/or in any direction and good luck to you understanding local English in many parts of US from Texas to Mississippi to Arkansas, Idaho or/and wherever else.
Or maybe RUDE is the fact that every larger city (not only in US) has its ghetto (or several) with the same linguistic oddities?
Dear elizadeux, these are facts - and facts are not rude or otherwise - they just are. They exist - period.

And I don't even consider the propagation of such oddities RUDE, or anything - I just think they are wrong, especially in the place that teaches languages. Even if in common, spoken English of any area (whether it's small, medium or even huge) they are acceptable.

3 months ago
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