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"¿Necesita un taxi, señor?"

Translation:Do you need a taxi, Sir?

3 months ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Febin723695

Why is it 'Necesita' instead of 'Necesitas'? Its necesitas with tu right?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewnotinJapan
AndrewnotinJapan
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Since the question is addressing the man formally (he is called 'sir'), we need to use the 'usted' form of the verb which ends in -a instead of -as. Duolingo seems to be making more of an effort to distinguish between formal and informal address.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bovinecow
Bovinecow
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Shouldn't the sir not be capitalized? I mean, its not a proper noun.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaGreydanus

Well, dropping the "do you" is essentially just slang, and since it doesn't change the meaning, a native English speaker would know what you meant. But Duolingo isn't really in the business of teaching slang ;) Good Spanish to good English, you know?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jim_Jarrett

Except when they DO want a word for word and when they DON'T. There's no indication what it wanted.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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At the very beginning of the course when they were teaching pronouns, we had to put the Spanish pronouns, but in Spanish they usually don’t bother to put the pronouns and this is not slang. This is the normal way. So, now that we have had some practice with the endings for the verbs, they will be dropping the subject in Spanish when they can, but in English we keep the subject except for the imperative.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adams.alice.k

At least in the US southwest, it's pretty common usage to drop the subject when the context is clear, imperative or not. It's not even on the level of slang. It's just something that happens pretty frequently down here. In this particular sentence, "Need a taxi, sir?" makes perfect sense in English without the subject. English is my first language. I've spoken it for years and years. That's why the insistence that the subject is necessary here is extremely confusing to me.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Why, even “Taxi, sir?” will be quite commonly heard, but this is someone selling his service. This is an ad, not correct grammar for a complete sentence that you were taught in school. Even common usage for someone selling his service can be considered slang. In fact, it is a common approach to attracting attention. In Spanish, the difference is that when you add the subject, it actually emphasizes the subject. That is how uncommon it is to use the subject there.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adams.alice.k

The way you worded this made it extremely difficult to discern a number of things about your statements. I think you may have needed a question mark after that "why," as without the question mark, it implies the presence of the words "that is" before it, but those words don't make sense in this statement. That aside, conversational grammar is very different from written grammar, and as such, dialogue in books very rarely follows the same rules as the rest of the writing. The statement given is clearly a piece of dialogue, as someone is being directly addressed by it. Thus, it follows common usage, as opposed to the prim, proper, and perfect rules of grammar school. The question here isn't about the level of formality of the statement, it's about whether multiple statements which are both in common usage in English should be accepted as adequate translations.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Scroll down to the later use of “Why” as an interjection which does not take a question mark and it does not use the added words “that is” and it makes perfectly good sense:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/why

Yes, I understand that you feel that it should also be allowed. You could try reporting it, but keep in mind that people also take this course, who do not have a background in English and are trying to solidify their English. This is a somewhat specific use and slang is often commonly used. Should we promote misspellings of words, because advertisers do it? Yes, people from other countries have had an impact on the way we speak our language. This program does teach grammar as well as the spoken word. They may accept it or not, but at least I have explained the reason that they might not.

Newspaper boys on street corners would call “Get your newspaper here.” This is actually the imperative form. Taxi drivers will call out “Need a taxi.” and it is also actually derived from the imperative form.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mary367532

The

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rose597860

Need a taxi sir? Does anyone know why this is not accepted?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Try reporting it as a common expression in English. This would not work with just any verb. The standard way to ask a question in English would be to say “Do you need a taxi, sir?” and that is the translation that is accepted here. English does not normally drop the subject except for the imperative, but many taxi drivers come from other countries. I have seen it dropped with the verb “want” also. We love shortcuts so it seems to have caught on.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/usmcsax81
usmcsax81
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I understand that duolingo is trying to get us to drop the "usted" and still understand the context, hence the verb tense. But, shouldn't it also accept, "Does he/she need a taxi, sir?"?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Possibly, but when you address someone directly the assumption will be "usted", so you would add the other pronoun if it were not usted.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Assumptions can go the other ways also. When we imagine context, that is personal, not universal.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Exactly, a context in which “he” is the subject and yet you address the conversation to “sir” would not be very universal. You could try reporting it, but I believe that “sir” was given as a clue to help us figure out that we should use “you”.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom945150

why is sir at the end of sentence wrong? it's common to ask for needs and then the address

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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It is not wrong. What exactly did you put? The error highlighting is not always placed correctly. The error can be anything previous to it.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruthie-K

Why is it ''Necesita'' when they are asking a male, not a female? Isn't ''a'' a feminine thing, and ''o'' a masculine thing?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Adjectives and nouns often end in ‘-a’ for feminine and ‘-o’ for masculine, but “Necesita” is a verb so the endings change for each person and number. Remember how we say “I need”, but “he or she needs” that is the same reason the verb changes, but it changes for more of the pronouns.

Yo necesito = I need

Tú necesitas = you need (familiar singular form used in Spain with family, friends and children)

Usted necesita = you need (formal singular form used in Spain with people that you need to show respect for older than you, strangers, people that you are not on a first name basis with. In Latin America though, many places don’t use the familiar form and usted can be used for both.)

él necesita or ella necesita = he needs or she needs (Keep in mind that everything is either masculine or feminine in Spanish.)

nosotros necesitamos = we need (nosotras is used if we are all females)

vosotros necesitáis = you need (familiar plural form used in Spain and vosotras is used if you are all females)

ustedes necesitan = you need (plural formal form in Spain, but used for all plural in Latin America)

ellos necesitan = They need (ellas if they are all females)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mary367532

I was asked to translate in Spanish I translating it me back to the next question just saying it is wrong

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drawingwit2

First of all im not a sir second of all señor isn't feminine

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“Sir” = “Señor” though. So pretend you are watching one person talking to another in front of you instead of directly to you.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryno932971

"Sir " is old fashioned.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnilGokool

I was asked to translate this spanish sentence to english. But duolingo left out the word "usted". Personally it doesnt bother me because i think saying "sir" is formal enough and it should just be: ¿Necesitas un taxi, señor? This formal/informal thing does not make sense.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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In English they don’t have very many verb forms, scroll up for the Spanish forms. The very fact that sir or “señor” is used means that you must use the formal form “necesita” in Spain. In Latin America, the form to learn is the usted form as it is the most used form which is often used instead of the familiar form - kind of like how in English we don’t use “thou” anymore.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Voilia
Voilia
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Wouldn't be 'mister' instead of 'sir' ok as well? It was marked wrong

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HollyN.2

Couldnt this also mean.. "Need a taxi, Sir?" More casual..

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adams.alice.k

I don't get why people downvoted this, here in the southwest we drop nouns all the time when the context is clear. Maybe it's the influence of Spanish speakers in the area, but I very rarely hear "you need a ?" or "Do you need a ?"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

This can also be "does he need a taxi, sir?" Perhaps two men are standing together and one is blind but waving in front of a hotel? Or a taxi driver is asking the doorman at a hotel? etc

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Yes, but the assumption is that you are asking the person that you are addressing the conversation to. That would be a good time to put a subject pronoun “él” or not add “señor”. Why would you be asking the gentleman if someone else needs a taxi? Why would it be so personally relevant to the gentleman that you would say “sir”? Personally, “ustedes” form “necesitan” might be used there if they seemed to be together. Also, I would have covered two birds with one stone. Now I could call a taxi for whichever of them needs it or for both of them. Absolutely, in another sentence “necesita” can mean “he needs, she needs, it needs, or you need”, but you do need to take into account what clues may be in the rest of the sentence.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dee288379

I got it right

1 month ago