"Hijo, hoy tú limpias tu dormitorio."

Translation:Son, today you are cleaning your bedroom.

5 months ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sofa4ka
sofa4ka
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Por favor, hoy no! Puedo hacerlo mañana???

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Mañana nunca llega, mi'jo. Hoy!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elias824530

I've always heard mi'jo spelled out. I've heard it constantly from relatives but inever put together that it meant "mi hijo"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james538335
james538335
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De verdad! No oler hoy. Pero mañana???

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcharroux

"Son, clean your room today" (or bedroom) should be accepted. "Son, you clean your room" is repetitive.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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That would be a command, which requires the imperative:

  • Hijo, limpia tu dormitorio hoy.
3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimK341589

This could be considered as a command, so the imperative tense should be used. I chose 'limpia' and it was not accepted. I am reporting it 7/4/2018

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScubaDi

I also used "limpia". I will report 8/18/2018. Does DL every acknowledge reports?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofa4ka
sofa4ka
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They have acknowledged mine a lot - in more than one language! Don't give up!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

They only acknowledge a submission when they decide to add it to the database of acceptable translations. We shouldn't expect an explanation for something that is rejected. I think that would completely consume their meager resources.

I would not wait for them to accept the imperative in this one. If you're translating from the Spanish, it is clearly not being used. If you're translating from the English, it is perhaps less obvious, but the convention in English is to drop the subject from commands. So, neither the English nor the Spanish uses the imperative.

I don't think the imperative is relevant to this one. It obviously is used in both Spanish and English when a parent tells a child to do something. That isn't what's going on here.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glyn667187

Nothing wrong with placing today at the end of the sentence. So how can it be wrong. Get a grip!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

I placed today at the end of the sentence and it didn't get marked wrong. I think it sounds more natural.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlueBleuBrandon

Son: Porque? Dad: Porque Si

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesJOL3

is this an imperative statement? ..if so, why no exclamation points?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rabidace03

Imperatives don't necessarily need exclamation points. It just means there's a command involved.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffersonB11365

No. Voy a la playa. No hay limpieza hoy.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarlLeonha1

You clean would be better than are cleaning

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

That does sound like a command. A rather scary one (unless the parent using your translation wasn't a native English speaker).

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marmac1613

ErcDz, learnerbeginner, sofa4ka, ArrigoC, all so funny and cute but most of us are in DuoLing strictly to learn not socialize. Please can we stick to the lessons & leave the rest for Facebook??

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnerbeginner

guilty as charged. now let us learn some spanish

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofa4ka
sofa4ka
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Querido aprendiz de DL,

Have you asked "most of us" before you decided to speak for... most of us??

Speaking for myself only - I have learned A LOT from comments!!!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atomic_brunette

I put down this exact translation, and it marked it wrong, saying 'hijo' was 'lad'. I am in America, and no one here says 'lad'. I know they do in other countries, but, still. What the heck?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kathy979841
Kathy979841
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I also put clean your bedroom today but it was rejected. Maybe a command has to be in third person, I cannot remember.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

My suggestion will sound very wrong to those who prefer more literal translations, but I think this sentence ought to be understood as a request rather than a description of current behavior - "Son, you should clean your (bed)room today." I know that "should" is usually translated with a form of deber, but that wouldn't make sense in the Spanish. The parent is not saying the son has an obligation to clean the room, which is what deber would suggest. The son is also not being commanded to do so via the imperative. The parent is just saying today's the day you're going to get around to cleaning up the mess in your room.

The use of the present indicative is common in Spanish where it isn't so common in English. That's why this one sounds odd when translated to simple present or present progressive. I don't think either captures the sense of the Spanish very well for English speakers.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ladyjoyous

Ugghhh!!!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/denis176578
denis176578
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Son, clean your room today.

1 week ago
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