"Ellasolotrabajadossemanas."

Translation:She is only working two weeks.

7 months ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Daan617064

Isn't "she only works two weeks" a better translation ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rooker4

Can't you put "only" after the word "is"?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rooker4

I meant to say before.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Audrey67885

I used "working only" also. I believe it should be correct!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tony_oui

She is working only two weeks, She only is working two weeks, She is only working two weeks...what’s the difference? Why aren’t these all correct?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Tony, I think that the three sentences you gave could all imply the same meaning in English and could be acceptable translations - especially since we don't have a context in which to interpret the original Spanish sentence. Just remember that some human being has to input all possible translations into the program. When you think your answer is correct, you should report it and eventually the Duo staff will review the report and add more acceptable answers. This is the only way they will build a complete database of all possible translations. They don't read these posts, so you must use the button to report an error. It is a good feeling when you get an email saying that the translation you reported has been added to the database!

If you are concerned about getting a wrong answer, the safest translation will be the one that most closely matches the original sentence, unless it would sound unnatural or incorrect in English. Literal, precise translations are almost always accepted. The most direct, word-for-word translation for "Ella solo trabaja dos semanas" would be "She only works two weeks." I don't know if that is accepted or not. I entered "She is working only two weeks" which was accepted.

While I was taking an English writing class in college, the instructor advised to put adverbs and adjectives as close as possible to the words they modify. This is not an English grammar rule, but rather a suggestion for more effective writing. I put "only" before the "two weeks" because I thought the sentence was referring to the period worked - two weeks as opposed to two years or something. If we put "only" before the verb, it could imply that for two weeks she only worked - e.g., she did not play or sleep or eat. This has nothing to do with this exercise, but I hope that someone might find it helpful when writing in English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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territech: I agree with your last paragraph. It is good practice to place the only immediately before the word or phrase it is meant to modify. There is not often ambiguity despite the location of the modifier, but for clarity it is a good practice to follow.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sousquark
sousquark
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They sound correct to me but the whole sentence doesn't really explain what she is doing - Has she only started work two weeks ago? Is she only going to work for two weeks and then stop for a bit? Does she only work for two weeks and then quit and find another job?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It wouldn't be the first interpretation. That requires the present prefect tense - "She has been working for two weeks." "Ella he trabajado durante dos semanas."

The others are possible.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob46196
Bob46196
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How do we know that "solo" means "only" and not "alone, as in "She is working two weeks alone"? It marked the latter wrong.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Because "alone" would be sola in this case. Plus you would put it after the verb.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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According to the following article, this Duolingo sentence contains an error. They meant "sólo" with an accent mark. https://spanish.yabla.com/lesson-Sólo-solo-Only-alone-90

If the meaning of the sentence is that she works alone, I think it would have been Ella trabaja solo por dos semanas. But I am not native Spanish speaker. Maybe it would need to be "sola" in this case to agree with Ella, but to my thinking this would be an adverb qualifying how she works, not an adjective for "ella." In any case, I think the reference is clear that to mean only, it must be "sólo."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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It is true that solo here is functioning as an adverb, and in the old days, you were right.

But these days, the RAE says to spell it sólo only when there might be confusion with the adjective. However there is no such confusion here---because of ella.

Now with él there would be, because then it could also mean "He alone is working two weeks."

Personally I try to use solamente instead of sólo wherever possible.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I guess that just proves one can't believe what is read on the Internet - no matter how solid the reference seems to be. I'm not familiar with RAE - can you provide a link?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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The Real Academia Española is the official keeper of the Spanish language.

Here's that link: http://www.rae.es/consultas/el-adverbio-solo-y-los-pronombres-demostrativos-sin-tilde

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Thank You. Have a lingot!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dave797731

I don't understand why "She only is working two weeks" is incorrect.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The "only" looks a bit awkward there. Usually you'd put it after the conjugated verb in a sentence like that.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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I agree RyagonIV. Duolingo often places words like only and sólo in the incorrect position where it modifies a word other than the one intended.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaLourd308985

"She only is working two weeks" is acceptable too.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THIwpqas

Is only vs only is?

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Is only working" sounds better than "only is working". Generally, adverbs sound better when placed in front of the main verb.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlp954181

I have checked three different translation,all differ with Duo. So I started to check different sources and about forty percent of the time their different, Microsoft, Prompt and S D L. Part of the problem is Spanish like English is spoken all over the world and differently. Compare Mexican with Cuba or Panama with Bolivia, I assume we are learning it as spoken in Spain.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/terrispan

I have been under the impression that Duo is trying to teach mostly words that would be understood in all Spanish-speaking locations. In these discussions, we often see people commenting on what is or is not said in their region. There are differences between and within the Latin countries, just as there are within the United States.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Panamapal

"only is working" should be accepted.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielDeik

I agree. I try not to separate the verb structure. Or is working only ...

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Trying to not separate verbs will never really work. :)

2 weeks ago
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