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"¿De dónde nos conocen ellas?"

Translation:Where do they know us from?

3 months ago

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyAur2
AnthonyAur2
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This should read, from where do they know us.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victorcarrera0

"From where do they know us?" Rejected and reported Aug 15 2018.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catherineschipul
catherineschipul
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Winston Churchill said it was fine to end a sentence with a preposition and I have always taken his word for it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DefyLimitations

That doesn't mean reject the answer that doesn't end in one.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nb.batman

Still marked wrong for the same | Sept 1, 2018

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leoniee-

Still marked wrong, september 4

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"From where do they know us?" is a valid translation, but "Where do they know us from?" is much more likely to be used.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LDS606930

Sorry it still is not good grammar to use a preposition to end a sentence with (Churchill)

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I used to be a proponent of not ending sentences with prepositional clitics, which are actually adverbial in nature. Now, I just accept that it's a gray area that many people disagree about. Of course, if this were a scholarly work instead of a comment, I would have written the last sentence as " ... but now I just accept that it's a gray area about which many people disagree."

Most of the time, it's not difficult to reword a sentence this way, and I do. But occasionally it is, and that's the problem. When this is added to the fact that more and more native English speakers don't speak or think this way colloquially, it's easy to understand why this "grammar" rule is becoming obsolete. Not using prepositions to end a sentence is a matter of style, not syntactic necessity, and this particular style is declining as a knowledge of clitics and their syntactical uses becomes more widespread.

For a translator, there is sometimes no other way to translate accurately except by ending a sentence with a preposition, and it's really not worth wasting so much energy debating an acknowledged gray area. English has rid itself of many verb inflections, but English syntax has also evolved to use prepositions following verbs as adverbial verb inflections.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike209223

That’s your opinion and you’re welcome to it.

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aterix

Still wrong and reported as of 9/19 2018

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josie-H
Josie-H
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I agree but it was counted wrong for me.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaiminNam
JaiminNam
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Yes. It's still "wrong" as of September 3rd, 2018.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jane462

Yes i agree. You should not end a sentence with a preposition in English

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickDoy18

Absolutely agree. Sentences ending with prepositions have no place in a language course, no matter how many people use bad grammar.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Terry687354

I don't like to end sentences with a preposition so I'm more likely to say, "From where do they know us." This needs a fix.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorMcNam5

should this read ¿De dónde nos conocen A ellas?" if not why isn't the a needed? sorry if im being stupid

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kennypi
kennypi
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No, 'ellas' (they) is the subject. 'A' only comes before the object.

Nos (us) is the object. It could read: ¿De dónde nos conocen a nosotros?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rand5816

Thank you but I am still confused. Is the "ella" at the end required or optional?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChromosomeWarden
ChromosomeWarden
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I suppose "ellas" isn't required. But it's nice to give more information; and the sentence would be vaguer than it needs to be.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmittiga

Could the ellas come before nos conocen?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

If I've followed this argument correctly, ConorMcNam5 used "a ellas (they, feminine gender) as the subject of this sentence. Then, kennypi corrected him by writing that a personal (clitic) a is only used with direct objects that are people or pets, and writing that "ellas" is the sentence's subject because it is in subject case and is in the place where sentence order places a subject in a Spanish sentence.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ODubhghaill

¡Creo que es "Seis de una y media docena de la otra"!

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zola-Magician

How do we know where to place 'from' in this sentence?

I put 'From where', but answer says to put it at the end.

How to know next time??

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

A couple hundred years ago, when English acadamicians first formulated the rules of modern English grammar as we know it, they borrowed many syntactic rules from the dead language Latin, one of which was not ending a sentence with a preposition. As a result, numerous generations have been taught that the correct way to ask the question is "From where do they know us?" If you translate the two sentences "From where do they know us?" and "Where do they know us from?" into Spanish, "de dónde" is at the beginning of both translations because there is no other way to translate except "¿De dónde nos conozcan ellas?" In fact, it is BAD Spanish grammar to end a sentence with a preposition because Spanish is a Romance Language.

This makes sense because the language and syntax of the Iberian Peninsula was highly influenced during its 700 years of occupation by Rome. While Latin also influenced English vocabulary during the Roman Empire, English grammar and syntax was later changed significantly by the influence of Germanic languages, with one result being that it makes sense in English syntax to place a preposition after a verb as a type of clitic adverbial inflection. Thus, it is the natural inclination of native English speakers to think "Where do they know us from?"

Whether to stay with tradition and say "From where do they know us?", or break with it by using the more colloquial and frequently spoken "Where do know us from?", is a matter of personal choice. If you are going to translate from English to Spanish, however, it's better to learn to think in terms of "From where ... ."

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mskb1
Mskb1
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Both "From where do they know us?" and "Where do they know us from?" are correct. The latter is more common in casual speech.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wendy535599

No they are not correct in English. Proper English can not end on preposition. I appreciate that many English speaking people do but its incorrect.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chevy685216

Both, "Where do they know us from?", and, "From where do they know us?", are acceptable in English grammar. While the latter is proper English grammar and should be emphasized more than the former. Both should be counted as acceptable answers.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/molly756411

From where do you know us, was rejected

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VinnieTesla

Ellas = they, not us.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikRed1
ErikRed1Plus
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Actually, ellas = they, not you. Nos = us

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VinnieTesla

Oops! Sorry, yes.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LDS606930

My grammar teacher as authority: Never end with a preposition unless construction makes it more awkward not to do so. Churchill as authority, in responding to an underling who corrected his "error" stated: "Your correction is an impertinence up with which I will not put". So the issue cannot be finally settled, and certainly not by the arbiters oh these lessons

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sungwen

Would "Where do they recognize us from?" also work?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kennypi
kennypi
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That would be 'nos reconocen'

Conocer means to know, to meet, to be familiar with.

Reconocer means to recognize.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edawzz
Edawzz
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I think the recommended translation is the opposite

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John783233

Stop teaching bad English that ends a sentence with a preposition!

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UN1C0RN2

Funny thing is, they aren't teaching English. They're teaching Spanish. The same rules do not apply. Sorry the translation isnt perfect English, but it isn't bound by English rules just because you translate. Some things don't translate well, if at all.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyAur2
AnthonyAur2
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You're right, but this one does. "From where do they know us" is the grammatically correct way to say this in English. I'm not saying that should be the only response, but it should be the one it supplies when you look here or get it wrong

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel.Lee2

Didn't accept 'From where do they know us?'

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bdjbm8LK

Why does "De donde" have to mean " where...…….from" and not "From where do they know us". Trifle rigid!!!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It's proper Spanish.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milrecan
milrecan
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this is a bad sentence and bad English It should be From where do they know us.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/madredomo
madredomo
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What's wrong with "Wherefrom do they know us?"

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankFox0

"From where do they know us?" is correct English, but Duo marked it wrong. Up with this I will not put!

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/damnfyne
damnfyne
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Having read the comments that precede mine, I agree that: From where do they know us should be accepted and used that answer myself. However, I don't quite agree with those who argue that: Where do they know us from. is bad English. It is to most of us who received a formal education, but it is probably used most frequently in colloquial speech even by us who "know better". Languages do evolve and often because the majority rules.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike209223

From where do they know us is correct also.

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike209223

“since they seem to know us from somewhere I don’t know from where” So, “from where do they know us”. And “where from” sounds worse than clunky.

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike209223

This was my second chance so I wrote like Duo wants it. It’s easier that way.

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikRed1
ErikRed1Plus
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Tricky tricky duo, tricky tricky

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adeenah6

There are many kinds of sentences and moods that exsist n spanish that do not exisit n english.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rnp612

from where to they know us. IS THE SAME EXACT RESPONSE

2 weeks ago

[deactivated user]

    very awkward.

    2 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/LeoMurphy5

    Where do they know us from is improper English.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/0KyfnlOF

    It is theoretically ungrammatical, but that’s only because English grammar was based on Latin grammar and that is not particularly helpful nowadays. Many books now argue that prepositions can come at the end of the sentence & that the language has evolved. From where......sounds very Shakespearean.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Emily-Smith

    This is true, but it is still valid (if a bit formal and stilted) English, and as such, should be accepted. I'm reporting it. We older folks still remember being taught not to end a sentence with a preposition. Obviously, languages and usage evolve over time.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/hjh788272

    Agreed. In daily conversation I would never use 'from where' but if I was writing a formal letter/document I would still try not to end with a preposition if possible and still sensible.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/wendy535599

    Again, it is improper English to end sentence with preposition.

    2 weeks ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/UN1C0RN2

    This isn't English.

    1 week ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ivor810183
    Ivor810183
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    I put "how do they know us" which to me makes perfect sense?

    2 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ChromosomeWarden
    ChromosomeWarden
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    Your answer gives no mention of location. If the sentence was,

    "¿Cómo nos conocen ellas?"

    I would agree with you.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Megan592457

    Colloquially speaking, it's exactly the same, and grammatically a better translation than 'know us from,' which many of us have been taught not to do (as seen in discussion above). I think both it ('how do...') and 'from where do...' ought to be accepted as correct answers.

    2 days ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

    This "Where from" is a kind of word union, and as such the parts shouldn't be drawn too far from each other. That's why : "Where from do they know us." should also be accepted. This example is not the worst on this line, but I'm afraid that those will occur...

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/VinnieTesla

    Is there any English dualect in which that would siund natural? I don't know of one.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/0KyfnlOF

    I agree. Where from do they know us, is very very clunky. It might have been said in the 17th century, but certainly not today.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

    I see you are going to the roots. In Scandinavia it's quite common to put an explanatory adverb (postposition) at the end of a sentence, and that binds the whole sentence together. These traits entered to English from and because of the Norman (Vikings) and Danish influence in 'Great' Britain. Some examples: "Hur kom det till?" = How did it happen / "Var kom ni ifrån" = Where did you come from " = Where from did you come? Someone called them prepositions - no they are postpositions which define the main verb.

    3 weeks ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

    They are called "clitics" in English, but they are the same part of speech.

    1 week ago