https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeOkra

You are (Tu eres vs Usted es)

As a very new learner (two weeks) I am finding it difficult to deal with "Tu eres" vs "Usted es". The latter seems to me to be saying "you is". Can anyone help me to understand this?

5 months ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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The latter seems to me to be saying "you is". Can anyone help me to understand this?

'Usted' came about from a contraction/corruption or 'vuestra merced' ('your grace'), which is why it takes the verb in the third person singular (just as you would say 'Your Grace is...' in English if you were talking to a duke).

Edit: I've just noticed that guomashi has already told you this. Must remember to read other comments before replying...

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofi7161
sofi7161
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Para nosotros el usted es. Más que todo lo usamos a la hora de hablar con personas mayores o en en salón de clases algunos maestros nos tratan de usted por respeto. El tú eres lo usamos al referirnos a nuestros amigos de confianza. El usted lo usamos cuando hablamos con extraños porque no les tenemos confianza. And I have a question this is not like this " you are" or this is like this " you is" this is my question..... good night

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Regarding your question whether to use "you are" or "you is." Es siempre "you are" en inglés. "You is" es incorrecto.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George418878
George418878
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You have to abandon the notion that "es" = "is" and "eres" = "are." That is not how it works. In Spanish, the same conjugation is used for usted as for él and ella.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gracebirdgirl

Usted is used as a formal term. Think of when you would say Mr. Jones or Mrs. Jones in a conversation in English. If you are talking to someone who is older, ranked higher, or a stranger that you would treat with respect, you should use Usted. You say Usted es because Usted is treated as a singular noun like a name.

Tu is just informal. You would use this when talking amongst coworkers, friends, family, and people who know you well. Think of when you would call someone dude or perhaps swear around. That's how I relate it, anyway.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcragun

Something to understand about Spanish, is that it has 3 'persons' that a verb can be conjugated into:

1st Person: I (the person speaking): yo

2nd Person: You (informal): tu

3rd Person: He/She/It/You (formal): él/ella/(usually ommitted)/usted

In Spanish, the formal you takes the 3rd person. There are also plural versions of these:

1st Person: Us: Nosotros/Nosotras (if all female)

2nd Person: all y'all: just like this isn't used in all of the English speaking world, this exists only in Spain and is called 'vosotros'

3rd Person: They/You plural (formal): ellos/ellas/ustedes

Conjugation is the term for changing a verb based on person/number. In Spanish, every verb has a different conjugation for each person and number. In English 'to be' is one of the few verbs we still conjugate:

1st Person: I am

2nd Person: You are

3rd Person: He is

1st Person, plural: We are

3rd Person: They are

So, keep in mind that 'is', 'am', and 'are' are technically all the same verb in English, and follow the person, and you will be fine. Keep in mind that there are TWO verbs in Spanish for 'to be': ser and estar. But that's a whole 'nother talk.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caesarsgf
caesarsgf
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usted is formal tu is informal

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeOkra

It is not 'usted' vs 'tu' that I am questioing, it is the apparent anomaly between 'you is' and 'you are'.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofi7161
sofi7161
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I don't understand it!!!!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcragun

See my post above. Usted es = 'you are'. es and eres are the same verb, ser. The verb is translated differently with different persons, moods, and tenses.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennymoomeow

In Spanish, there are two versions of you are. The familiar Tu eres that is appropriate for friends or people your same age, or a single person. Usted es is appropriate for formal conversations, like people you respect or elders, or in a plural form. The same format applies to French and Italian language.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennymoomeow

One more thought on translating. In English we use a lot of gerunds, like you are drinking instead of just saying you drink. This can be confusing in another language because the exact translation doesn't fit the way we think as English-speakers. The format of verbs do not match 100%. So your question about "is" vs "are" is something that you will just have to memorize.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcragun

English nerd quibble (sorry to be so pedantic), but a gerund is a verb that is used as a noun (I like drinking tea). When you use the -ing form as a verb (I am drinking tea), it is called a present participle and altogether forms the present progressive or present continuous tense:

http://portlandenglish.edu/blog/difference-gerund-present-participle/

But you are very right that often when the present progressive is used in English (I am swimming on Friday) we would use the simple present tense in Spanish, typically. The progressive is generally reserved for acts that are currently in progress (I am swimming right now).

5 months ago
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