"Misabuelospracticaronbaloncestoenlaescuela."

Translation:My grandparents played basketball at school.

7 months ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

Because this is in the preterite I'm assuming they only played basketball in the school one time, otherwise the imperfect should have been used, 'practicaban'. If the sentence had just included, 'un día' then it would be clearer. Duo seems to confuse rather than improve understanding.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

Very good observation. This sentence sounds too general for the preterite and suggests 'they used to play' which would trigger the imperfect. It seems like the kind of error a beginner might make when choosing between preterite and imperfect

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I'd assume it meant they played/practiced one time - maybe their normal venue was closed. Practice should be accepted, however, since it's actually the more common meaning of the word.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trillones
Trillones
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Seems like "practiced" should be acceptable for "practicaron" also? In English, we say people "practice" sports, as well as play them. There's a slightly different meaning -- "practice" implies a competitive context with a team preparing for a game, while "played" could be either an organized, competitive game OR just for fun.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathanbost
jonathanbost
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I agree; now they have half accepted that, though. I said "My grandparents practiced basketball at school" and they said I was wrong, and that the correct answer was "My grandparents practiced basketball at the school." However, the main answer is just "at school"!! Duo needs to be more consistent with these types of things. I reported that my answer should be accepted, of course.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

Perhaps you should have used 'practised'. 'Practise' is the verb, 'practice' is the noun. Easy to get mixed up with our own native language isn't it?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LexxyR84

In the USA it's "practice" for both noun and verb, and "practiced" for past tense. "Practised" is a UK word that didn't carry over to the US.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LexxyR84

"My grandparents practiced basketball in school" should also be accepted....and apparently "My grandparents practised basketball in school" also...(for the record, my USA-bought computer tells me that "practised" is spelled incorrectly).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingo.hc
duolingo.hc
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practicaron = practised jugaron = played

Please correct.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

When speaking of sports, it's very common to use "practicar." If you do use "jugar," I believe you need to add the preposition "a" for sports ("mis abuelos jugaron al baloncesto ...").

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emir251411

Why it isn't "el baloncesto"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gray_Roze
Gray_Roze
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The indefinite article is not always necessary in direct objects.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ampus_Questor
Ampus_Questor
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Well, we can infer that. The clever bit consists in knowing when and when not to use it.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

"my grandparents practiced basketball at school" should be accepted. reported

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdb200433

practicar: doesn't it mean "to practice"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Yes, but when used with sports it's often translated as "play," since that's the verb we commonly use in English when we aren't actually emphasizing practice/training.

2 months ago
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