"¿Tútomasuntaxioelautobús?"

Translation:Are you taking a taxi or the bus?

7 months ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jack872103
jack872103
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Why is it incorrect to omit 'the'? Also, shouldn't the transition be 'Do you take..."?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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English simply requires an article in this construction. You could say Are you taking a taxi or a bus, but not usually are you taking taxi or bus. It just sounds incomplete.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Klgregonis, one of the things that good native English speakers do is omit as many words as possible. For example, think of the sentence "I'm as good as you." Strictly speaking, the full sentence could be stretched out to "I'm as good as you are." Similarly, omitting the second article is all right as long as they are the same article. Thus, "Are you taking a bus or taxi?" has long been acceptable and optional.

For additional information, see my answer to marcy65brown.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NotIJyy7

I put "Are you taking a taxi or a bus?" but I got it wrong

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Your translation was not accepted because you used the indefinite article for both nouns. See my response below to marcy65brown.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/transkter
transkter
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In English the first article used on the taxi also applies to the bus so you can say it are you taking a taxi or bus.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Saying "Do you take a taxi or bus?" sounds a bit odd to me. "Taxi or bus" seems to form a unit there. It's like you're talking about a vehicle where you aren't sure whether it's a taxi or a bus.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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In writing I'd include the article, but when the same article would be repeated for the second noun you'll often hear it dropped in common usage.

There is an alternative interpretation of "Do you take a taxi or bus?" too. "Bus" could be understood as a verb instead of a noun. It wouldn't be a precise translation of DL's sentence, but arguably it would be an accurate one.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manat297076
manat297076Plus
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That's exactly what I just got as the "right" answer - "a taxi or bus" People don't speak this way

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Some people do speak like this. See my answer to marcy65brown.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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"Do you take a taxi or the bus" accepted 7/21/18.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

To some people, it is a matter of style to use "parallel construction" in English. Parallel construction is defined by Google thusly: In grammar, parallelism, also known as parallel structure or parallel construction, is a balance within one or more sentences of similar phrases or clauses that have the same grammatical structure.

Example from Google: I burned the dinner, but not the cake. In this sentence, both nouns have the same article. This parallelism sounds euphonious to native English speakers, but is not mandatory. Consequently, "I burned dinner, but not the cake" is still grammatically correct. A sentence like "Are you taking a taxi or the bus?" is also technically correct, but most native English speakers intuitively dislike it even though they may not immediately be able to articulate why. Sometimes, a deliberate contrast of articles like this is a literary device used to make a point or stress a difference. Indefinite and definite articles are used for a reason, NotIJyy7's translation was not accepted because he used the indefinite article for both nouns.

In Spanish, as far as I can tell, parallel construction is mandatory much more frequently.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NotIJyy7

Yeah, I wasn't saying that the "accepted" answer was wrong. I just think it's awkward (as you agree), and I shouldn't be told I'm wrong for intuitively avoiding an uncommon and awkward phrasing.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Dinner" is a noun that's usually used without an article in English. You couldn't do the same with "I burned the bread but not the cake."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianauna
adrianaunaPlus
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Not for me, 28 sept 2018....;-(. Reported it..

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herb13
Herb13
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Rejected 12/9/18. DL is schizophrenic about accepting or rejecting the present tense when they "want" the answer to be the present continuous (progressive). It's a guessing game. If they want to equate them, then both answers should be accepted.,

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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  1. Klgregonis is right, technically both noun articles are necessary, but colloquially you could easily drop the second article so long as the first article can be applied to both nouns.

  2. "Do you take" is correct, and probably more accurate out of context than "Are you taking", but Spanish, like English, often uses the present tense to refer to the near future.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/llibllens

The audio is not pronouncing "tomas" correctly. It is saying
"to más". The correct pronunciation is "tó mas".

Go to spanishdict.com and type in "tomas" , tap on the speaker symbol to hear it pronounced correctly

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DouglasPet81633

I gave the above translation, and the program responded "Another correct solution:" and repeated exactly what I had!? This has happened several times recently. What's wrong with their program?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK158665
EdK158665
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And the reporting options don't allow reporting it (on the web interface anyway).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Natalia302555

Might be extra spaces?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stick109

Why "a taxi or the bus"? This just doesn't make any sense. Should be the same article for both.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abs1973
abs1973
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We say a taxi because is unspecific, any taxi would do. On the contrary buses operate along a prescribed route according to a fixed schedule, so you can't take any bus but the the one that stops at your destination.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeithProud

Not altogether correct. For instance in my little town in Mexico there are several bus operators who ply the same routes. So in this case you can choose from more than one.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK158665
EdK158665
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I'm thinking about why I say it this way... I guess it's because "the bus" is like a fixture or utility, and I have to accommodate its schedule? But "a taxi" and "a bus" should be accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NotIJyy7

Linda_from_NJ has a good explanation of this in response to marcy65brown

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel558018

Do you take the taxi or a bus?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It's a bit unconventional, and doesn't match the Spanish sentence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alback-isback
alback-isback
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"Do you take a taxi or bus" ..... how can be that for taxi you need an article but for bus you don't?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK158665
EdK158665
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It's not unusual to leave the second article off--it's an abbreviation that assumes the second article. But it may be slang (?).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeithProud

I find this a bit confusing. While I know that it says "are you taking" using the present tense seems wrong. It should be painfully obvious what type of vehicle you are in at present. This sentence should be in the future tense. "Will you be taking" or "Are you going to be taking" In English it is wrong, perhaps a native Spanish speaker could chime in on this one. Sept. 24, 2018

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Yep, this is one sentence that is really open to interpretation, and DL's choice of the present participle in English doesn't help. That said, it is not incorrect.

Keep in mind that within context the question asker could be remote from the person being asked the question (a phone call for example), in which case the present continuous can work for the present. The present continuous can also be used to refer to the near future in English, so again it is OK in this sense. However, in this case Spanish uses the simple present, which of course could also be translated into English as such.

So it all gets a bit messy, but without context that's often the case. Here are the basic possible variations:

Spanish simple present and English simple present referring to habitual action:

¿Tomas un taxi o el autobús? - Do you take a taxi or the bus?

Spanish simple present and English continuous present referring to the future:

¿Tomas un taxi o el autobús? - Are you taking a taxi or the bus?

These are pretty much interchangeable with the Spanish formal and informal future and the English versions of it:

¿Tomarás un taxi o el autobús? - Will you take a taxi or the bus?

¿Vas a tomar un taxi o el autobús? - Are you going to take a taxi or the bus?

Then you have the possible phone call context using Spanish and English present participles for the continuous present:

¿Estás tomando un taxi o el autobús? - Are you taking a taxi or the bus?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adriano732737

en efecto: In my native uk english ¿Tomas un taxi o el autobús? - Do you take a taxi or the bus? can also be used to refer to a future event.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Are you saying for a singular future event? If so maybe that's OK in your dialect, but it would be really weird in mine. For singular future events we'd only use "Are you taking; Will you take; Are you going to take".

If you're referring to habitual action, which includes future events, then "Do you take" is the norm, but I've already said that.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianauna
adrianaunaPlus
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do you take a taxi or a bus declines...Enero 2019...reportado

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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The meaning is the same, but literally (and a little more commonly) "the bus".

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

Llevo vs toma can be confusing at times!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Tomar - you take something for yourself
Llevar - you take someone or something along

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClaudetteB691862

I know I just hit the wrong button -

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure

Doesn't sound like a question.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aes925610

"the" works just as well as "a". why was it corrected?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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These words have different meanings. But unless you're more specific about the problem, it's hard to assess.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chevy685216

Audio is not working.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scrybbler

She clearly says "un taxi", not "el taxi." Currently being marked as wrong for the "write in Spanish" option.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaChic

Do Spanish speakers ever shorten "autobus" to "bus"? In English, bus became a shortened form of "omnibus." Just curious if anyone has heard "Tu tomas un bus?"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I have heard hispanohablantes use bus and buses instead of autobus. and autobuses.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaChic

Thank you, Klgregonis

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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For those English-speaking nations who don't use the verb to take for travelling on buses, trains, planes, etc., 'Are you catching' or 'Do you catch a taxi or the bus?*' is also accepted.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bweera
bweera
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My answer was exactly the same. "Are you taking a taxi or the bus?", But DL gave another correct solution as "Are you taking a taxi or the bus?", Which is exactly the same what I wrote, !!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cnewren88

I get that they have a specific meaning they are going for, but is "Do you take a taxi or a bus" actually an incorrect translation?

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Not super-incorrect, but the Spanish sentence does say "un taxi o el autobús". It's more natural to make the bus, or public transportation in general, definite.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeSoltis

Do you take... is also correct. Also, "a" taxi or "the" bus?? I have never heard anyone talk like that. This is just one of those 'trip you up with stupid mistakes' problems. Not like there aren't many here ;)

1 month ago
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