"Sí,tambiénmeencantaelfútbol."

Translation:Yes, I also love soccer.

7 months ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RuAPrIsz

I was marked wrong for putting also before I, why?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nickaged
Nickaged
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Because it doesn't make sense

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

It is just awkward with the preceding word 'yes'. As a general statement (as opposed to the answer to a question like Duo's sentence), one could say: Also I love soccer = También me encanta el fútbol.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Why awkward? "Yes, I love soccer, too." If there is an awkwardness, it is that most of us would use "too" instead of "also" and we would put it at the end of the sentence.

As for También me encanta el fútbol, as near as I can tell, it does not take on the same meaning as "Also I love soccer." In English, we put "also" at the beginning of the sentence to mean "I love soccer as well as something else." Likewise, we put "also" in the second or last position ("I also love soccer"; "I love soccer, too") to mean either (a) "I love soccer just as someone else does" or (if context suggests) (b) "I love soccer as well as love something else." I'm not sure this distinction dictated by word order is the same in Spanish.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

You misinterpreted what I said was awkward. I was specifically referring to the sentence structure of 'Yes, also I love soccer'. Normally, one would say 'Yes, I also love soccer'.

As for the rest, I'm not really sure what you are getting at. We have no context here so: Also I love soccer = I also love soccer. Sure, context could change the meaning slightly but as I said... there is none.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Sorry. I agree that "Yes, also I love soccer" is an unlikely English construction. What I misunderstood is that you were saying another poster's "marked wrong" answer was awkward. I thought you were criticizing the DL translation, since so many here seem to have a real grudge against this program most of us use for free.

"As for the rest", I was simply pointing out the importance of word order in English, which, again depending on context, can make a little or a lot of difference.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Guillermo8330, I can't reply to your second post so I'll respond here.

I also don't understand the grudge against this program. It has done for me what 2 years in High School and another 2 years at University couldn't... teach me another language. Now, I'm thinking about starting a third!

As for learning English... Many Spanish speakers take the reverse course to work on their English... and vice versa. Plus, I've actually learned a ton about English in learning Spanish. So, your points are very valid and please, don't let me dissuade you from discussing English.

Buena suerte mi amigo.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Gracias, Miguel. I tried another online program and found I spent more time trying to guess what the program wanted me to respond than I did learning the language. I wish we had a way to thank the DL creators and mods directly, but I suppose such an address would invite 100 complaints for every message of appreciation. I hope the DL people chalk it up to the rampant negativity that seems to dominate all forms of anonymous social media.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yydelilah

Duo should also accept 'football' as well as 'soccer' - more of a direct translation too!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ewan838823

they do

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaviOnline
RaviOnline
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How do we differentiate between "I also love..." and "I love... also" in Spanish? Can 'también' be placed at the end?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

What's the difference? Can you give an example in English? Because "I also love chocolate" and "I love chocolate, too" mean the same as far as I know. If meaning isn't clear from context, Spanish has devices that resemble those in English: "Me encanta el chocolate y también la vainilla." (I love chocolate and I love vanilla, too.) "A Juana le encanta chocolate. A mi también." ("Jane loves chocolate. I do, too.") Etc. and so forth. (Disclaimer: I am not a native speaker. Anyone should feel free to correct me.)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kito24

I think you can put también at the end

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

I think so, too. I.e., "Lo creo también."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arodmell

I put football and was marked incorrect ?!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Report it.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scotsloon1

Was I marked wrong as football is soccer - in the whole world apart from the USA.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda87434

So was I marked wrong for the same reason. Dont get it. I dont call football "soccer"

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Where are you from, Linda? DL seems oriented toward the Americas. As discussed in other threads, for the most part DL favors Latin American Spanish and American English.

In Spanish, el futból = soccer (in the U.S.). What English-speaking Americans call "football" is el futból americano or el futból norteamericano in Spanish.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandonBaca

How can I know when to but "el" instead of "al".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

There's no one, easy answer to your question. Most of the time, it depends on the verb. I love football (lit. Football enchants me) = "Me encanta el fúbol". I play (at) football = "Yo jugo al fútbol".

There's no one, magic rule that covers all verbs and all topics. We have to learn each usage as we encounter it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/queenpaula15

Why is "también" before "me"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Full disclosure: I am not a native speaker. But I believe "tambien" can go before or after "me encanta", but not between "me" and "encanta". As in English, it isn't clear without context whether one is saying "I like football in addition to liking baseball" or "I like football, as does Jim."

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RNOT3X

why is it el futbol can't it be just futbol

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

I'm sure Spanish speakers would still understand you if you dropped the "el", but it isn't correct form. In fact--as we have been discussing in other threads--Duolingo doesn't use the direct article (el or la) as often as some of us were taught to do several decades ago. Spanish seems to be evolving (perhaps under the influence of English).

It doesn't hurt to memorize the article with the noun ("el fútbol" instead of just "fútbol"). You have to know the gender of Spanish nouns anyway because adjectives have to agree, so you might as well learn the correct article as you go.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Duolingo doesn't use the direct article (el or la) as often as some of us were taught to do several decades ago.

I have noticed a lot of people have been misguided about the usage of articles, most of the rules people say exist regarding articles are misguiding, most of the times Duolingo has it right.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

May I ask, respectfully, about the source of your knowledge? Are you a native speaker? From where? What is your general age grouping? I'm asking because I'd like to know how and where Spanish has evolved. There are a lot of us who were taught differently. I have assumed Duolingo knows best about current usage, but it would really help to know how or where the changes came about over the past 30 years. Back in the day, Spanish didn't change so easily or quickly.

BTW, in American English, we generally use the verb "misled" rather than "misguided". We use "misguided" almost exclusively as an adjective. So "I was misled by his lies. That's why my opinion is misguided."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cliv
cliv
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Duolingo tends to be Latin American Spanish, whereas (30 years ago) Spanish in schools was more likely to be Castilian Spanish.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

I grew up barely 100 miles from Cuba, so my teachers were all from the Caribbean until college. Even at college (in NYC), I only had one teacher who spoke Castillian. I have never, for example, studied 2nd person plural, so even allowing that textbooks were written by others, they were nonetheless directed at a Latin American audience. My only exposure to Castilian was in a Spanish Lit for Native Speakers seminar I talked my way into, where we read EL CID, DON QUIXOTE, the Generation of 98, etc. So I don't think the changes can be blamed on Ferdinand and Isabella. I do think it's possible that the influence of English has influenced small changes to Spanish over the years. New York and Southern California speakers--even those who claim to speak no English at all--tend to toss in a lot of English into their Spanish, I have noticed.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardHam898541

Surely Spanish call it football rather than soccer?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Absolutely. I think the point posters are making is that if you are translating into American (not British) English, then "soccer" is the appropriate term for non-American football. (I'm using "American" as shorthand for "of the U.S.A." Latino cultures in the Americas follow the conventions of the rest of the world. Canada has its own adaptation of American football, so I presume "football" in Canada would apply to Canadian football.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

When do we use "me" instead of "yo"? In this example would it be just as correct to say "yo encanto" instead of "me encanta"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanWitham1
IanWitham1
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I think a literal translation would be "Soccer also enchants me."

"Yo encanto el fútbol" could be, "I enchant the football." Which would be a usefull phrase if you are Sabria the Teenage Witch.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

Very droll. Anybody else help with this?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Ian may be droll, but he is also correct. "Gustar" and "encantar" use the reflexive form. Translate them in your mind as "to please" and "to enchant". ("Me gusta el pastel." = The cake pleases me; or as we would usually say in English, I like the cake.)

"Me gusta chocolate." In English, we usually say "I like chocolate", but in Spanish, the same thought is conveyed as "Chocolate pleases me."

As for "yo" v. "me", yo is the subjective pronoun (in English, "I"), me is the objective pronoun (in English, "me"). We misuse the two in English a lot, but technically they are not interchangeable in either language. (E.g., in English, we respond to "Who is it?" with "It's me." The correct response is "It is I.")

Back to Spanish, use "yo" when referring to the one who does the action. "Yo como carne." "I eat meat." Use "me" when referring to the object of action. "Me come el perro." "The dog eats me."

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

That helps. Much obliged.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kilijuve

Socker is wrong version it is football !!!!!!!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

The exercise is to TRANSLATE the Spanish sentence into English. In American English we call international football "soccer". Now, when speaking or writing in Spanish, I use "el fútbol" and "el fútbol Americano" as does most of the world.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nickaged
Nickaged
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So the correct answer is football!

2 months ago
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