1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Spanish
  4. >
  5. "Yo disfruto un día en la pla…

"Yo disfruto un día en la playa."

Translation:I am enjoying a day at the beach.

June 12, 2018

129 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bdbarber

It's a good thing we have the option of listening to a slow version of this sentence. No matter how many times I listen to the fast version, I can not understand what is being said:p; even after listening to the slow version.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill289935

Agreed..no matter how many times I listen to the fast version, I just can't hear "un día"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/el-Canguro

I found the same .... "un dia" was hardly audible in the fast version. Reported


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pat92981

I have reported it too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vicki887485

How do you report something it keeps saying incorrect when i wrote it down several times and it is correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

You probably had a typo or extra space somewhere. Next time, copy and paste your answer so we can look at it and help you see what happened.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EliseCalim

It says the answer is i am enjoying a day on the beach. Why is it enjoying rather than i enjoy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaddyJay1

In English, verbs in the present use "-ing." "I am enjoying today." But, in Spanish, "-ando" (the equivalent of "-ing") is used much more sparingly. Think of it as what you are doing in the current moment right now as you are speaking. Whereas, in English, you could say "I am completing my bachelor degree." But, since it takes several years to do and is stated in less of a concrete manner (Versus "I am walking" as yiu walk and talk), you could be at the store talking to someone about it. You're still in the degree program, but you are not right then studying for a class when speaking at Target. It's an odd concept for us English speakers to differentiate between, but I hope that makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan844763

Good explanation. In this example however I feel it is almost the opposite and the two English translations have different meanings. ' I am enjoying a day at the beach' means you are there now and enjoying it. ' I enjoy a day at the beach' means that you enjoy going to the beach but are probably not there at the moment. Not sure if the difference could be correctly made in Spanish using '-ando'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

In Spanish, the present progressive is used for things your are doing "right now" or "at this moment. Thus, "estoy disfrutando" would be appropriate.

So, yes, the difference could be correctly made with "ando". Also, read PaddyJay1 above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

In English you can also use the present progressive for the future. "What are you doing this weekend?" "I'm enjoying a day at the beach!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kendra255689

So I learned all about -ando and -iendo for nothing in school? That's messed up. I still can't see the difference. I would think "I enjoy a day at the beach". I don't like that there really is no distinction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Spanish does make a distinction between disfrutar and "estar disfrutando", but it's not the same distinction English makes.

English usually uses the present progressive to talk about a single event with a defined end. "I'm throwing this ball" - I do it once and then the action is over.

Spanish, on the other hand, uses the "estar + gerundio" form only as a progressive aspect: we're in the middle of the action, and it's progressing, and the progress is important for some reason. "Estoy disfrutando un día" could be the answer to a question like "What are you doing right now?"

The gerundio form has another common application when one action is modified by another action: "Él salió corriendo" - "He ran out", lit. "He left running / in a running fashion."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James123018

Of course there is a distinction. Here is an example from real life. The first message of the morning from a friend: "Me voy levantando. Anoche llegué muy tarde." This is present progressive, she is getting up, right now, and wants to tell me that, even though this is obviously something that happens every day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGrahamCable

Should that not be
"Me estoy levantando." instead of
"Me voy levantando."?
Or possibly "Me voy a levantarme?"
Was the person who sent you that message native Spanish? Or did you not copy it correctly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James123018

Good question. Yes, she is Colombian; where I live. I have a degree in Spanish and this type of non-estar present progressive construction was never taught, but, as Grace says, it is very common. Here is another, from real life; this time from a Mexican. "Mi gato anda caminando por el techo". I asked the speaker why she was not using '"estar" and she said "andar" conveyed the sense of milling around up there. Here's another one I hear all the time: "Voy llegando", as in "Stop asking me where I am, I'm almost there."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

Hi TheGrahamCable. "Me estoy levantando" is the right sentence, but the other one is an expression. It is fine and very common. Regarding the phrase you gave: "me voy a levantar" or "voy a levantarme". Saludos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juanita475979

So is it wrong to use "I enjoy a day at the beach"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Juanita, it's not exactly wrong, but it sounds a bit odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleLehner1

If someone were to call you and ask you in Spanish, "what are you up to?" Would most spanish speaking people respond with "yo disfruto" or "yo estoy disfrutando"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace780329

When you say: what are you doing? We say: ¿Qué haces? And when your answer is: I am watching tv, we say: Veo la televisión. In the "now" we use present tense but we always use the present continuous. En el "ahora o ya" usamos presente simple pero también el presente contínuo. The same ex.: ¿Qué estás haciendo? Estoy viendo la tv.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictorGold8

Estoy Disfrutando is what you are doing and would be the correct answer. The Yo Disfruto could be something you like to do but are not doing it at that precise time, Unless the person asking the question knows what you are doing thenit may be ok to say ''yo disfruto''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveNewhouse

I agree with the estoy disfruto....but it was marked wrong today. 27/12/18.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"Estoy disfruto" doesn't work. Either use disfruto or "estoy disfrutando".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IloveNorm

Can someone tell me, is there a way to differentiate between....I enjoy a day at the beach (generally) vs I am enjoying a day at the beach (right now)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

En la vida real usamos las dos frases de la misma manera. Es cierto que una es más general y la otra es "ya", pero se usan las dos formas todo el tiempo. Es muy común y se entiende perfectamente.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiguelAgustin0

I'm enjoying a day at the beach. It can be ESTOY DISFRUTANDO o DISFRUTO. If when I say that I am at beach. Perhaps I would prefer to say ESTOY DISFRUTANDO.

DISFRUTO I only use it I have that routine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johngt44

Yes. There is a great explanation above on this very thread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ralfberg

Reading the other posts and still dont get it - why yo disfruto cant also mean "I enjoy a day at the beach" like answering to a question - what do you enjoy? Instead of speaking about what you are doing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It can mean that, no problem. It's just a less likely thing to say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucianolfp

From a native speaker, the proper translation should be "(yo) estoy disfrutando de un día en la playa".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Using the progressive form (estar + gerundio) is usually not necessary to translate the English progressive. Also the de is very optional in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucianolfp

If I recall correctly the exercise asked me to translate from english: "I am enjoying a day at the beach" to spanish. The correct translation is "(yo) estoy disfrutando (de) un día en la playa".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

"In Spanish, the present continuous tense is used to talk about something that is happening at this very moment."
https://grammar.collinsdictionary.com/us/spanish-easy-learning/the-present-continuous-tense

"The Spanish present progressive tense (el presente progresivo), also called the present continuous tense (el presente continuo), is used to talk about something that is happening now."
https://grammar.collinsdictionary.com/us/spanish-easy-learning/the-present-continuous-tense

"It is used to express that an action is happening right now (at the moment of speaking)."
https://www.clozemaster.com/blog/present-progressive-spanish/

"[T]his verb tense is a way to talk about what we're doing in this moment like what is happening right now so you really want to emphasize what is going on, and in English this might sound like our ing tense like "Right now I am speaking you are listening we are studying" and we're really emphasizing what is happening right now"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbyY-hG9xUQ

Also, we are discussing the usage in Spanish. Why should we care about discussions of the usage in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

Machine translation is unreliable and you cannot use it to back up your claims. Also, your Wikipedia link might be in Spanish, but it's about English usage.

The Spanish gerundio is more than just "the action has not yet been completed". None of the comments I listed suggested otherwise. We're well aware this is not the perfective. But past that, it's about an action that is actively in the process of happening right now, and the fact that's it's actively in the process of happening right now is relevant.

And I have never once seen "de" used with the gerundio outside of flawed machine translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucianolfp

Since you decided to continue this conversation without backing up your claims either. What I am saying is that my translation to spanish is also valid. Probably more valid that that the one Duolingo provided as the only valid translation.

"Machine translation is unreliable", well, provide me with a machine translation that gives the translation defined by Duolingo to be valid?. Or are you suggesting all translation apps are wrong?. And in the case of Google Translate users can fix an incorrect translation so it's not just "machine" translation.

"your Wikipedia link might be in Spanish, but it's about English usage", well no. It's about providing a spanish sentence that conveys the same meaning of the original english sentence. The exercise I did here was to translate fron english to spanish.

Here it is in english: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Present_continuous "To describe something which is happening at the exact moment of speech" "To describe an action that is taking place now and is subject to interruption".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristieSp9

Is the "un dia" we can't hear thr kind of thing we will hear talking with people in the real world or us this just a poor example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

Es una frase común y normal. No es un pobre ejemplo. Estoy disfrutando un día de sol, estoy pasando un día hermoso, estoy disfrutando un día de lluvia (si te gusta la lluvia). Estoy pasando (disfrutando) un día con mi familia. Regards


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

Explica, por favor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

If you're talking about the pronounciation of this sentence, it's pretty poor. I can't hear a clear 'd', which would be pronounced better in the real world.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TadasM2

On, at, in the beach?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"On" and "at" are good. "In" only applies if you're buried in the sand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

However you say it naturally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amina_sub

¿Por qué un día no una día?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

Hola Amina_sub. La palabra "Día" es masculino, es "el día" y "un día". Saludos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NancyCaput

I enjoy a day at the beach, I enjoy swimming, I enjoy going to museums. In the sense of an example of things one enjoys would this not be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

Yes, "I enjoy a day at the beach" is a valid translation. If you typed that without any errors and it marked you wrong, then you can flag it next time and report "My answer should have been accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gogeebo

Since when was día a masculine noun to get un? I thought its feminine...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

Not all nouns that end in -a are feminine. It's not straightforward like that. This video should explain it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fre-Vd438Ok


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7Cakepops

I have no idea what all of you guys are saying. Tbh even when im reading the supposed to be helpful comments im scratching my head. Spanish really be doing this to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Cakepop, if you have a specific question, you're free to ask it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jusplainjim

The male speaker clearly pronounces "Yo" with a "y" sound as in yes, rather than a "j" sound, as in Joe. Random or is there a reason?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

It's a regional variation, a bit like "po-tay-to" vs "po-tah-to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luke348775

...And will soon be arrested for breaking the shelter in place law


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaeshaunMo

Why is "disfruto" not "enjoy" instead of "enjoying"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

DaeshaunMo. Continuous verb tense in English is translated into Spanish, generally, as simple verb tense. Los tiempos continuos del inglés son traducidos generalmente, como tiempos simples en español. Regards


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Piggy830459

Why isn't it "estoy disfrutando..."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PierreMich14

I enjoy means the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roisha6

Yo disfusto can be "I am enjoying" or "I enjoy", no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tambajuice

Why wasn't "disfruto un dia en la playa" accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Tamba, if you have a listening task, you need to include all the words that are spoken. Yo is included in this sentence, so you have to add that as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason553407

"I am enjoying a day at the beach" and "I enjoy a day at the beach" are different tenses, isnt it? And should have different translation in spanish, verdad?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim226018

Read the rest of the posts in this discussion thread and you should find the answer you seek.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

Both are present tense. Simple vs progressive is a matter of aspect.

And no. Different languages handle things differently. Saying they "should" have different translations to mirror the different English nuances is imposing English onto Spanish, and it just doesn't work that way.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/27621594?comment_id=39016782


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calle47

Why isn't "I enjoy a day at the beach" accepted as correct. Wouldn't additional context be needed to indicate whether you are currently at the beach or simply stating a like?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joserayburn

You have 2 sentences that use “un día”. One says, “un día” is “one day” and “a day”is incorrect. The second sentence that uses “un día” says “a day” is correct, and “one day” is incorrect. Well which is it? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

Unfortunately, there's no simple answer to your question; as with many other cases, the proper interpretation depends on context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaraBurrows

Why is the correct answer showing "en" instead of "a"? Isn't the translation for at "a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

Different languages use prepositions differently. Never look for a one-to-one correspondence. Instead of thinking "Spanish word = English word", start understanding the contexts in which they are used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

If you're talking about locations, en usually means you're in that location (position, in/on/at), while a means you're moving to that location (movement, to/towards). Exact translations may vary a lot, depending on the phrase. Like "al lado de", which you'd usually translate as "next to" or "at the side of" in English, but is more accurately represented by "to the side of".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RitaTaylor3

I wrote 'on the beach'and was marked wrong. Should have read 'at the beach' .!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictorGold8

It can also mean i enjoy a day at the beach. The confusion i have is i could say that as if i was at home saying what i enjoy, The other meaning with ''i am enjoying'' is that i am already there doing it. the other translation is ''estoy disfrutando'' Which the makes sense because it seperates what i like doing to what i am doing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SerenaVu01

Why is "un dia" masculine instead of feminine when "dia" ends with an a?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James123018

There are a number of masculine-gender nouns in Spanish that end with an "a," particularly "ma." For example, el síntoma, el tema, el lema, el sistema, el poema (but not "la rima"), el clima, el coma, el idioma (can't forget that one), and also el planeta.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

Masculine -ma nouns tend to come from Greek.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It comes from the Latin "dies", which is masculine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

This leads to the obvious next question. "Why is the Latin masculine? :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

Because in Proto-Indoeuropean it was masculine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

At least "-es" is a more typically masculine ending than "-a", so I hope that's enough of an explanation.

Genders don't make sense. :´)

And to the others: The PIE root is "*dyḗws", which is only declared masculine because its descendants are masculine. There was no writing or recording of the direct ancestors of Latin, so Latin's as far as we can go back with absolute certainty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Actually, it's sort of a "never ending" set of questions -- the type that children will ask. The question of mine was somewhat facetious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

Día: del latin "dies" y este de la raíz indoeuropea dyeu "Dios", y marca 2 cosas principales: el día de 24 hs. Y la parte de ese día en que hay luz. Saludos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ExpiredVenom

I just realised that the pronunciation of 'yo' has been swapped from 'jo' to 'yo'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jean488562

The gentleman's voice swallows a lot of words and comes out as a blur. CLEARER DICTION PLEASE


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Wait till you listen to human Spanish speakers!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrinleighH1

"I am enjoying" is in the present progressive tense which would be Estoy disfrutando instead of just disfruto. Disfruto is enjoy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

Spanish uses the progressive aspect differently than English does. Generally, the simple aspect in Spanish covers uses that in English could be simple or progressive. Don't force English grammar and usage onto Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

The English present progressive doesn't not match with the Spanish "estar + gerundio" form in most cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

See the Rae.F response, above


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lin969133

Why is 'I like a day on the beach' not acceptable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

This doesn't really make sense in English, I'd say. Disfrutar is "to enjoy", to have a nice time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

"I like X" is "me gusta X", where X is actually the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TwicefanOncearmy

How do we know if it is past tense or present tense, or even future tense? You could say "enjoy", "enjoying", or "enjoyed"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

Right now, the Spanish verbs we're learning are all in the present tense.

I enjoy: yo disfruto
I enjoyed: yo disfruté
I will enjoy: yo disfrutaré

"Enjoying" is not a tense, it's the progressive aspect. English and Spanish use these differently. In English we tend to use the simple to indicate a habit or preference ("I enjoy a day on the beach when the weather is nice.") and the progressive to indicate it's currently happening ("I'm enjoying a day on the beach--wish you were here!") or it's been planned ("I'm enjoying a day on the beach this weekend--why don't you join me?").

In Spanish, they use the simple for both generalities and specifics, and only use the progressive when it's important to call attention to the fact that it's happening right now. ("Estoy disfrutando un día en la playa--¿por qué me molestas?")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/larryrolli2

there is no difference between I am and I'm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikita445317

The English is 'at the beach' so what is the difference between 'en la playa' and 'a la playa'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV
  • en la playa - on/at the beach
  • a la playa - to the beach

The preposition a is used for the goal of a movement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

Spanish speakers say "en la playa". It has nothing to do with how English speakers say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nBnQ2

Why are we penalized every time we report something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blue271142

What happens when there's no sound, and you are apparently aware of that situation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

You can tap or click on the speaker icon repeatedly, which should make the sound play eventually. If not, check if your speakers are on. If neither helps, you might have to restart the lesson and/or your browser or app.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith285650

Why not I am enjoying a day ON the beach? I understand en means at, in or on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

The Spanish word "en" is often used in contexts where we would use "at", "in", or "on" in English. It is up to native speaker judgment to decide which English preposition is the most appropriate in any given sentence. As far as I am aware, most people say "a day at the beach", which is why that is the primary answer listed. Duolingo focuses on Standard American English, and the course contributors cannot be expected to know all of the dialectal variations. If a variation is common enough they will add it to the database, but do not expect them to add every single minor variation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan844763

Agreed. I sometimes wonder if contributors seeking approval of their incorrect or very unusual English cannot in fact be natural speakers of any dialect of English but Spanish people learning English or perhaps native speakers of another language unable to learn Spanish using their own language.

“A day AT the beach” is standard UK, US and probably everywhere else English, particularly if it relates to going to a place with a beach.

“A day ON the beach” is also correct, particularly if you are living or staying near a beach and should be (and now is) accepted by Duolingo but they are right in recommending AT, especially for the sake of Spanish people learning English.

On the beach would be the more correct if, for example, you are at the coast sitting on a grassy area near the beach and notice John isn’t around. You ask, “Where’s John?” and are told “He’s ON the beach.” Similarly, you’re staying in a hotel beside a beach and when asked if you’re joining others on a boat trip you reply, “No, I’m just going to have a day ON the beach.” In these situations using ‘at’ would (to me) not sound quite right, though acceptable.

“A day IN the beach” is totally incorrect in every circumstance. Even if buried up to your neck you’d be in the sand. You cannot be in a beach.

(Middle-aged speaker of UK/Scottish English)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

There's no problem with enjoying a day on the beach.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roshanvict

yo difruto is more I enjoy rather than I am enjoying which is Yo estoy disfrutando?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

From elsewhere on this page:

"In Spanish, the present continuous tense is used to talk about something that is happening at this very moment."
https://grammar.collinsdictionary.com/us/spanish-easy-learning/the-present-continuous-tense

"The Spanish present progressive tense (el presente progresivo), also called the present continuous tense (el presente continuo), is used to talk about something that is happening now."
https://grammar.collinsdictionary.com/us/spanish-easy-learning/the-present-continuous-tense

"It is used to express that an action is happening right now (at the moment of speaking)."
https://www.clozemaster.com/blog/present-progressive-spanish/

"[T]his verb tense is a way to talk about what we're doing in this moment like what is happening right now so you really want to emphasize what is going on, and in English this might sound like our ing tense like "Right now I am speaking you are listening we are studying" and we're really emphasizing what is happening right now"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbyY-hG9xUQ


"Enjoying" is not a tense, it's the progressive aspect. English and Spanish use these differently. In English we tend to use the simple to indicate a habit or preference ("I enjoy a day on the beach when the weather is nice.") and the progressive to indicate it's currently happening ("I'm enjoying a day on the beach--wish you were here!") or it's been planned ("I'm enjoying a day on the beach this weekend--why don't you join me?").

In Spanish, they use the simple for both generalities and specifics, and only use the progressive when it's important to call attention to the fact that it's happening right now. ("Estoy disfrutando un día en la playa--¿por qué me molestas?")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lets_learn_team.

'En la Playa' es un tono de llamada meliflua en iPhone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WendyMorri13

why can't you say yo disfrutiendo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

"yo disfrutiendo" = "I enjoying", which is not good English, or Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

Please explain the down votes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

Hi sguthrie1. Sometimes people are bad for no reason. There is only one wrong thing: It is not "disfrutiendo" it is "disfrutando". Just to clarify I didn't vote. Saludos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maggie2324

You need to use "estoy" in that circumstance. "(yo) estoy disfrutando" is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nesrine535955

Why "i enjoy a day in the beach" is incorrect?? Shouldn't it be accepted as well??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spiceyokooko

I enjoy a day at the beach, should be accepted but not I enjoy a day 'in' the beach which is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nottm98

"I enjoy a day on the beach" is correct and accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

You're only "in" the beach if you are buried in (under) the sand. Spending a day buried under sand could be deadly.

That is why you are "at" or "on" the beach, but not "in".

Compare it to "being in a grave'", rather than "at" a grave(site).
In addition, being "on" a grave is sacrilegious to many.

Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.