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"Yo disfruto un día en la playa."

Translation:I am enjoying a day at the beach.

June 12, 2018

70 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EliseCalim

It says the answer is i am enjoying a day on the beach. Why is it enjoying rather than i enjoy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaddyJay1

In English, verbs in the present use "-ing." "I am enjoying today." But, in Spanish, "-ando" (the equivalent of "-ing") is used much more sparingly. Think of it as what you are doing in the current moment right now as you are speaking. Whereas, in English, you could say "I am completing my bachelor degree." But, since it takes several years to do and is stated in less of a concrete manner (Versus "I am walking" as yiu walk and talk), you could be at the store talking to someone about it. You're still in the degree program, but you are not right then studying for a class when speaking at Target. It's an odd concept for us English speakers to differentiate between, but I hope that makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan844763

Good explanation. In this example however I feel it is almost the opposite and the two English translations have different meanings. ' I am enjoying a day at the beach' means you are there now and enjoying it. ' I enjoy a day at the beach' means that you enjoy going to the beach but are probably not there at the moment. Not sure if the difference could be correctly made in Spanish using '-ando'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

In Spanish, the present progressive is used for things your are doing "right now" or "at this moment. Thus, "estoy disfrutando" would be appropriate.

So, yes, the difference could be correctly made with "ando". Also, read PaddyJay1 above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

In English you can also use the present progressive for the future. "What are you doing this weekend?" "I'm enjoying a day at the beach!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kenkie1121Exo

So I learned all about -ando and -iendo for nothing in school? That's messed up. I still can't see the difference. I would think "I enjoy a day at the beach". I don't like that there really is no distinction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Spanish does make a distinction between disfrutar and "estar disfrutando", but it's not the same distinction English makes.

English usually uses the present progressive to talk about a single event with a defined end. "I'm throwing this ball" - I do it once and then the action is over.

Spanish, on the other hand, uses the "estar + gerundio" form only as a progressive aspect: we're in the middle of the action, and it's progressing, and the progress is important for some reason. "Estoy disfrutando un día" could be the answer to a question like "What are you doing right now?"

The gerundio form has another common application when one action is modified by another action: "Él salió corriendo" - "He ran out", lit. "He left running / in a running fashion."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James123018

Of course there is a distinction. Here is an example from real life. The first message of the morning from a friend: "Me voy levantando. Anoche llegué muy tarde." This is present progressive, she is getting up, right now, and wants to tell me that, even though this is obviously something that happens every day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGrahamCable

Should that not be
"Me estoy levantando." instead of
"Me voy levantando."?
Or possibly "Me voy a levantarme?"
Was the person who sent you that message native Spanish? Or did you not copy it correctly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James123018

Good question. Yes, she is Colombian; where I live. I have a degree in Spanish and this type of non-estar present progressive construction was never taught, but, as Grace says, it is very common. Here is another, from real life; this time from a Mexican. "Mi gato anda caminando por el techo". I asked the speaker why she was not using '"estar" and she said "andar" conveyed the sense of milling around up there. Here's another one I hear all the time: "Voy llegando", as in "Stop asking me where I am, I'm almost there."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

Hi TheGrahamCable. "Me estoy levantando" is the right sentence, but the other one is an expression. It is fine and very common. Regarding the phrase you gave: "me voy a levantar" or "voy a levantarme". Saludos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janbo475979

So is it wrong to use "I enjoy a day at the beach"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swetha0811

My answer 'I enjoy a day at the beach' got accepted - on 7/2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david450413

What if I was telling Juan that "I enjoy a day at the beach" would it be written otherwise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

It would be written the same: "Juan, disfruto un día en la playa."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyunghadl

I think Duo takes both I am enjoying or I enjoy.

But I said On the beach, not At the beach as the snswer and marked wrong.

Does it must be AT, not ON, the beach?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleLehner1

If someone were to call you and ask you in Spanish, "what are you up to?" Would most spanish speaking people respond with "yo disfruto" or "yo estoy disfrutando"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace780329

When you say: what are you doing? We say: ¿Qué haces? And when your answer is: I am watching tv, we say: Veo la televisión. In the "now" we use present tense but we always use the present continuous. En el "ahora o ya" usamos presente simple pero también el presente contínuo. The same ex.: ¿Qué estás haciendo? Estoy viendo la tv.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictorGold8

Estoy Disfrutando is what you are doing and would be the correct answer. The Yo Disfruto could be something you like to do but are not doing it at that precise time, Unless the person asking the question knows what you are doing thenit may be ok to say ''yo disfruto''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IloveNorm

Can someone tell me, is there a way to differentiate between....I enjoy a day at the beach (generally) vs I am enjoying a day at the beach (right now)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

En la vida real usamos las dos frases de la misma manera. Es cierto que una es más general y la otra es "ya", pero se usan las dos formas todo el tiempo. Es muy común y se entiende perfectamente.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiguelAgustin0

I'm enjoying a day at the beach. It can be ESTOY DISFRUTANDO o DISFRUTO. If when I say that I am at beach. Perhaps I would prefer to say ESTOY DISFRUTANDO.

DISFRUTO I only use it I have that routine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johngt44

Yes. There is a great explanation above on this very thread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucianolfp

From a native speaker, the proper translation should be "(yo) estoy disfrutando de un día en la playa".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Using the progressive form (estar + gerundio) is usually not necessary to translate the English progressive. Also the de is very optional in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucianolfp

If I recall correctly the exercise asked me to translate from english: "I am enjoying a day at the beach" to spanish. The correct translation is "(yo) estoy disfrutando (de) un día en la playa".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Machine translation is unreliable and you cannot use it to back up your claims. Also, your Wikipedia link might be in Spanish, but it's about English usage.

The Spanish gerundio is more than just "the action has not yet been completed". None of the comments I listed suggested otherwise. We're well aware this is not the perfective. But past that, it's about an action that is actively in the process of happening right now, and the fact that's it's actively in the process of happening right now is relevant.

And I have never once seen "de" used with the gerundio outside of flawed machine translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucianolfp

Since you decided to continue this conversation without backing up your claims either. What I am saying is that my translation to spanish is also valid. Probably more valid that that the one Duolingo provided as the only valid translation.

"Machine translation is unreliable", well, provide me with a machine translation that gives the translation defined by Duolingo to be valid?. Or are you suggesting all translation apps are wrong?. And in the case of Google Translate users can fix an incorrect translation so it's not just "machine" translation.

"your Wikipedia link might be in Spanish, but it's about English usage", well no. It's about providing a spanish sentence that conveys the same meaning of the original english sentence. The exercise I did here was to translate fron english to spanish.

Here it is in english: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Present_continuous "To describe something which is happening at the exact moment of speech" "To describe an action that is taking place now and is subject to interruption".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"In Spanish, the present continuous tense is used to talk about something that is happening at this very moment."
https://grammar.collinsdictionary.com/us/spanish-easy-learning/the-present-continuous-tense

"The Spanish present progressive tense (el presente progresivo), also called the present continuous tense (el presente continuo), is used to talk about something that is happening now."
https://grammar.collinsdictionary.com/us/spanish-easy-learning/the-present-continuous-tense

"It is used to express that an action is happening right now (at the moment of speaking)."
https://www.clozemaster.com/blog/present-progressive-spanish/

"[T]his verb tense is a way to talk about what we're doing in this moment like what is happening right now so you really want to emphasize what is going on, and in English this might sound like our ing tense like "Right now I am speaking you are listening we are studying" and we're really emphasizing what is happening right now"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbyY-hG9xUQ

Also, we are discussing the usage in Spanish. Why should we care about discussions of the usage in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoahPillow

In what world is "I enjoy a day at the beach." incorrect? If I wanted to say "I enjoy a day at the beach", I would have to say "Yo disfruto un día en la playa", no? Every other time I've seen the present tense being used by duolingo, it accepts both a present tense and present progressive tense translation, but here only the present progressive is accepted? Any reason?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

"I enjoy a day at the beach" ought to be accepted. The next time something like that happens, double-check for typos and other mistakes, then click on the little flag icon and report "My answer should be accepted." Although in this case, it could be one of Duolingo's infamous glitches because I'm pretty sure "I enjoy a day at the beach" has been accepted before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nanditaetae

Can I use disfruta for a female speaker. Like "Yo disfruta una día en la playa''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

No. Verbs have nothing to do with gender. You're thinking of adjectives.

Regular verbs conjugate like this:

https://i.imgur.com/gZ6vpyh.png


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TadasM2

On, at, in the beach?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"On" and "at" are good. "In" only applies if you're buried in the sand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

However you say it naturally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amina_sub

¿Por qué un día no una día?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grace290138

Hola Amina_sub. La palabra "Día" es masculino, es "el día" y "un día". Saludos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gogeebo

Since when was día a masculine noun to get un? I thought its feminine...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

Not all nouns that end in -a are feminine. It's not straightforward like that. This video should explain it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fre-Vd438Ok


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jusplainjim

The male speaker clearly pronounces "Yo" with a "y" sound as in yes, rather than a "j" sound, as in Joe. Random or is there a reason?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

It's a regional variation, a bit like "po-tay-to" vs "po-tah-to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roshanvict

yo difruto is more I enjoy rather than I am enjoying which is Yo estoy disfrutando?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

From elsewhere on this page:

"In Spanish, the present continuous tense is used to talk about something that is happening at this very moment."
https://grammar.collinsdictionary.com/us/spanish-easy-learning/the-present-continuous-tense

"The Spanish present progressive tense (el presente progresivo), also called the present continuous tense (el presente continuo), is used to talk about something that is happening now."
https://grammar.collinsdictionary.com/us/spanish-easy-learning/the-present-continuous-tense

"It is used to express that an action is happening right now (at the moment of speaking)."
https://www.clozemaster.com/blog/present-progressive-spanish/

"[T]his verb tense is a way to talk about what we're doing in this moment like what is happening right now so you really want to emphasize what is going on, and in English this might sound like our ing tense like "Right now I am speaking you are listening we are studying" and we're really emphasizing what is happening right now"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbyY-hG9xUQ


"Enjoying" is not a tense, it's the progressive aspect. English and Spanish use these differently. In English we tend to use the simple to indicate a habit or preference ("I enjoy a day on the beach when the weather is nice.") and the progressive to indicate it's currently happening ("I'm enjoying a day on the beach--wish you were here!") or it's been planned ("I'm enjoying a day on the beach this weekend--why don't you join me?").

In Spanish, they use the simple for both generalities and specifics, and only use the progressive when it's important to call attention to the fact that it's happening right now. ("Estoy disfrutando un día en la playa--¿por qué me molestas?")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElderJackman

So...is "día" NOT feminine? Because it seems like all other feminine words en with the letter "a". Is "día" an exception?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

Not all nouns that end in -a are feminine. It's not straightforward like that. This video should explain it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fre-Vd438Ok


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cora361551

Un dia not una dia? Por que?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

día is one of many nouns ending in -a that are masculine. Something to do with their origins.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

Día is not a loanword. Spanish is just not that regular. This has been explained on this page before:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fre-Vd438Ok


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

Who said anything about loanwords?
I said origins (where it comes from, its roots), which is entirely consistent with the posts in this discussion, as seen in the thread started by user SerenaVu01 here: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/27621594?comment_id=29477780 🙂


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ozlemeee

disfruto un dia en la playa. isnt it right. do i have to use yo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2797

The subject pronoun is generally optional. It should only have pointed out that "dia" should be "día", it should not have marked you wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnMarieNoSpace

This seems like it could be translated as both "I enjoy" and I am enjoying" In conversation you would know which tense to use but seeing it here in my phone not so much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BestSong111

I wrote "I am enjoying the day at a beach". I know that Duo prefers literal translations, but I think the fact that Duo used "enjoying", which is the present tense makes the day specific. Hence, it's more natural, in English to use the definite article (the) than the indefinite article (a).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Nope. You the tense doesn't affect the article used. The day would have been el dia. Saying a day at the beach is quite natural.

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