"¡Solo tengo sesenta centavos!"

Translation:I only have sixty cents!

June 12, 2018

21 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JocyO51

I don't understand why DL is giving a traduction of "centavos" by "cents". A peso remains a peso, an euro remains an euro, shouldn't a centavo remain a centavo? Merci.

July 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenBarclay

Not sure what "traduction" means, but agree that "centavo" should remain a centavo. Especially if it doesn't correspond exactly to a penny.

September 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beto330368

Traduction (in French) = Translation (Maybe "Merci" was a hint) ;)

Just my 2 ¢

Cent- the 100th part of the monetary units of various other nations, including Australia, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Brunei, Canada, Ethiopia, Fiji, Guyana, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Kenya, Liberia, Mauritius, New Zealand, the Seychelles, Sierra Leone, the Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, and Uganda.

July 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZJpuy91C

Is that "2 cents" or "2 centavos"?

September 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dirk858585

Exactamente :)

July 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alezzzix

Pesos, dollars, and euros are currencies, a cent is, in some countries, a monetary unit equal to one hundredth of a decimal currency unit.

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter802775

You don't spell out the conclusion. For me, this means, if I have sixty centavos in my pocket, they remain sixty centavos no matter in which language I say it. End of story.

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZJpuy91C

Because, Duolingo is Duolingo.

September 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danaesq

Agreed!!!!!

October 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardIdi

Why not: "I have only sixty cents!" ?

June 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vereschagin

Agreed. Reported. 21 June 2018.

June 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martha112199

I agree. "Only" should come AFTER "have" to modify "sixty cents." It is misplaced to put it before "have" because then it modifies "have" and the meaning becomes you just HAVE the money and don't do anything else with it. (Though colloquial this arrangement is often used the same way, even though it is not correct.)

June 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It's correct and fine to use.

  • I only have sixty cents. - I have that amount and nothing more.
  • I have only sixty cents. - I expected to have more.
December 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy65brown

"I have only sixty cents" accepted 8/17/18.

August 17, 2018

[deactivated user]

    Centavos are not cents.

    January 13, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth200489

    ¡Solo tengo zero centavos!

    June 26, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Croptart

    "I have only sixty cents" still not accepted. Reported Jul 21, 2018.

    July 21, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thylacaleo

    'I have only sixty cents.' was accepted today 16/10/2018 (see also marcy65brown's post from a month ago).

    As also noted in previous posts (see Martha112199), this construction makes more sense than Duo's. Although in common usage, the placement of only in Duo's sentence puts the emphasis on the word 'have' and is therefore misplaced, unless of course the implied meaning is that you have the money, but you don't spend it, or give it away, etc. But that seems doubtful.

    October 16, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/17spendiffsmith

    I have only sixty cents apparently isnt allowed.

    July 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dugggg
    • 1395

    "I just have sixty cents! " is the true meaning of this sentence. "I have only sixty cents" (Tengo solo sesenta centavos) means that the sixty cents is the only thing you have (and nothing else).

    August 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cantaloupe2

    what a mood

    October 11, 2018
    Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.