"¿Quieres comer conmigo hoy?"

Translation:Do you want to eat with me today?

4 months ago

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ViktorVictorious

"Would you like to eat with me today?" - why not accepted?!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Duolingo is a fan of more direct translation. Quieres is used here, which is an indicative form of querer, so it translates to "you want". You used a conditional form of "to like", which is gustar in Spanish, so your - very polite - sentence would translate as "¿Te gustaría comer conmigo hoy?"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Broncos27
Broncos27
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This was my pick up line in High School Spanish.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingoACW

nice streak

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/akili.alex

Why is "Would you like to eat with me today" wrong?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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Would is conditional. This sentence is about practicing the plain vanilla present tense.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howie973706

How do i know if conmigo means "with me" or "with you"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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Conmigo is with me. Contigo is with you.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brittney120070

Conmigo is "with me" and contigo is "with you"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esn024
Esn024
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"with you" is "contigo", isn't it?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel303668

yes for tu, consigo is formal usted, ustedes, el, ella, etc

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kas334864
Kas334864
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Not that easy. Consigo is rarely used, and never for formal you. It's always with him(self). With formal you it would be: con usted.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robertbuurke

"Want to eat with me today?" should also be correct.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Formal English requires the mentioning of a subject (outside of imperative sentences).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krizzards
Krizzards
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In conversational English, robertbuurke's sentence makes perfect sense and is commonly used. The sentence does not imply that we are in a formal setting.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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But Duo requires the pronoun to be sure you're translating it right. It's just being practical.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinAmmer

Fascinating how the spanish language uses many fewer words than English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

More amazing is how English has so many different words to say the same thing.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TaylorCunn12

Something straight from Google... Synonyms for "Happy" - cheerful, cheery, merry, joyful, jovial, jolly, jocular, gleeful, carefree, untroubled, delighted, smiling, beaming, grinning, in good spirits, in a good mood, lighthearted, pleased, contented, content, satisfied, gratified, buoyant, radiant, sunny, blithe, joyous, beatific.

I guess you're not wrong.

23 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMoreno883496

haha that is so true

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angus455145

Wouldn't you say ' ¿Quieres comer con yo?'?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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No, "con yo" would be "with I". Conmigo is an old contraction for con and mi and is the only way to say "with me" they I've ever seen.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kas334864
Kas334864
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Yeah, conmigo (and contigo) is a redundant cum mecum, cum tecum (Latin of course).

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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Latine quidem!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larissa.X
Larissa.X
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No, it's always expressed as conmigo. (It'd be understood, but grate on the ears of grammar lovers - like saying, "Do you want to eat with I?"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VictoryStar527

What's the difference between "conmigo" and "con mi"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Conmigo means "with me". It is what automatically happens when you combine con and .

"Con mi" on its own doesn't work. You can say "con mi perro" to means "with my dog", for instance.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrendaLaPartera

"Do you want to dine with me today" is an exact translation, but was rejected.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I like the word "exact" because it gives me a leverage point. :)

"To dine" is defined as "to eat dinner". And "dinner" refers to the main meal of the day, which is hopefully not every instance of "eating".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeisham

I don't think that your translation is necessarily 'exact,' because "comer" is "to eat" when used informally as a verb. Formally, as when addressing "Señor," it would be meant as "to dine." Context must be considered.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alchemist22

Why isn't "Do you want to eat me today" not accepted?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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Conmigo mean "with me".

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RickLouque

I don't have a problem with this question, however I am only able to get to this page by accident while I am making a screen shot. How do I get here when I want to? Pardon my English.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Now the question is if you'll see this reply. :´)

If you're on the web version, you can reach the comment section of each sentence after you gave an answer in that task. On the very bottom of the screen you can find a link called "Discuss" which leads you here.

If you're on mobile, there's a speech bubble icon on the banner that pops up after you answer a question. Tap that and you'll land in the comment section.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12teelord

It refused "Do you want to eat together today?" However, IMHO that would have the same meaning since the "together" implicitly means "you and me together".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Not if the topic of the dialogue has been about another person:

  • "I called John yesterday. We want to meet up during lunch break."
  • "Oh, do you want to eat together?"
1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/allie336687

I wrote what it said but it said it wa incorrect

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lina348838

I want to learn Spanish not english with this question i fell that iam learning english so pleas find anther way to teach it and thanksany way for your efforts guys

1 hour ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TaylorCunn12

That would change the whole website. Unless English isn't your first language, it SHOULD feel like you are learning Spanish. Give it time.

1 hour ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krizzards
Krizzards
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"Want to eat with me today?" should be accepted. Reported.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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In formal English you're required to mention a subject when it comes to questions.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krizzards
Krizzards
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If Duolingo was trying to teach only formal English, than it wouldn't except "What's up?" for "Que tal?" This sentence is most likely used in an informal setting (tu quieres) and spoken. In that situation, "Want to eat with me today" is complete normal English and should be accepted. No one would think that a person saying this is not fluently speaking English.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I'm not talking about "formal English" in terms of "stuff you should use in formal situations", but about the grammatical quality of the sentence. "What's up?" is good because it contains all the parts necessary for a proper question. But "Want to eat with me?" is an incomplete sentence. It doesn't have a clear subject, which English requires.

1 month ago
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