"Este plato, la vaca lo cocinó."

Translation:This dish, the cow cooked it.

4 months ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MelCohn
MelCohn
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I'm in the farm section. I grew up around farms. You can actually come up with better sentences then farm animals cooking and cleaning. Real work happens on farms. I don't see dogs checking into hotels over in the other sections, and that is more realistic! You could set up some scenarios like "Watch out for the cow manure in the field" or "Can you feed the chickens, please?" or "Close the door so the horses don't get out." I like children's storybooks well enough, but I also like real life. These sentences are just getting a bit irritating.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndesSky

Hi, The humour in these lessons aside, let's self teach among ourselves. May I suggest that you post a new thread on the forum, with a raft of just the sentences and asking proficient speakers to please tell us how they say that? And to post pictures so we can learn by association? Perhaps some common signs too! (Anything that sounds like a complaint may bring on unnecessary arguments.)

I hope you might want to invite replies how things are said in different areas.

PS I can't do this because I don't know farms well enough although I'd love to live on one. I do dream to.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David219902
David219902
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The "it" seems redundant in English. "This dish, the cow cooked" flows better but was rejected.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndesSky

I think that their version is training our mind to 'think Spanish'.

For myself, I'd prefer two presentations where required: a literal one and a well-translated one. But that could become messy and still bring on debates.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

This sentence, my school teachers would all hate it. In English the most likely way to make it acceptable would be to punctuate it as follows: This dish? The cow cooked it. If DL is not going to open the punctuation can of worms (fine by me!) I would suggest allowing a more proper English translation like: "The cow cooked this dish."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/twinhealthnut

Would this be acceptable? This plate (as in dish or plate of food), the cow cooked it. DL marked it wrong.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

Were I a duobot, I'd shoot down that English translation at once!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

totally

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RahulSood1

Maybe it should of been "The cow cooked the dish". Equally dumb but somewhat more understandable

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RahulSood1

Worst. Sentence. Ever.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenStanish

Hilarious how angry some get at these unusual farm animal questions. Maybe it's effective at searing information into brains, the way annoying ads do.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crf.
crf.Plus
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  1. More stupidity in this section. Cows don't cook things. This isn't cute, DL, it's irritating.
  2. Everywhere else, "plato" can be plate or dish. Now it tells me I'm wrong and I should have said "meal". I know that you crowd-source this stuff, but come on... did you test it at all?
3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elvolcanchapin

Oh, come now. Maybe it's a sarcastic reply to a dumb question.
i.e. "Did the chef cook this plate?" "No, the cow cooked it". In real conversation, you never know.

Also, it could be an example of personification, which is common and effective in literature of any language.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crf.
crf.Plus
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Yes. And there may be some circumstance that can be dreamed up where “the monkey butt licked the strawberry” is somehow comprehensible. That doesn’t mean that exotic convoluted sentences are effective teaching tools.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobZhurunkle

Apparently it is a good tool since now everyone who struggled with this silly question will remember that plato can mean meal.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crf.
crf.Plus
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Memorization that one particular unusual translation must be used to get a specific question right on DL is just memorization. No, that is not a good teaching tool. They have other exercises (like the word matching) that work very well for teaching alternative translations.

DL is not trying to teach alternate translations by counting correct ones wrong; they just made a mistake.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

Just made a long explanation. Computer dumped it. Shorter version: "plato" as thing to put food on—DL happily takes "dish" or "plate". When the food on plate is the focus DL is much happier to see "dish". Go with the flow, reduce your error count and report.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aculady
aculady
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It sounded like it said "la vaca no cocino".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeresaTalk3

This whole section is a bunch of ridiculous sentences. I thought the topic was home..... must have misread it as farm.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

Maybe they are referring to a fat cook? It's a stupid sentence and I can't understand anybody ever using it!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

Doubt it. Though "vache" in French can have just that meaning, this student has yet to see "vaca" used that way anywhere (Though with the speed el Castellano has been changing in recent decades, just about anything can happen!). A more common injuria for your unfortunate cook involving an animal would be "cerda."

2 months ago
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